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Taking Control:

Taking Control:

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  1. Taking Control: Ontario History Curriculum

  2. Courses: May be required or optional. Optional courses are designed for different student needs. Strands: All courses are sub-divided into 3 or more strands. These are groupings of expectations with slightly different foci. Specific Expectations: Each strand includes many specific expectations. These are specifically written understandings that form the body or content of the overall expectations. Overall Expectations: Each strand includes 3 or more overall expectations. These are broadly written enduring or essential understandings students are expected to learn.

  3. SOCIAL STUDIES 4 TO 6 Expectations are organized into two strands: • Heritage and Citizenship • Grade 4-Medieval Times • Grade 5-Ancient Civilizations • Grade 6-Aboriginal Peoples and Early Explorers • Canada and World Connections • Grade 4-Provinces and Territories of Canada • Grade 5-Aspects of Government in Canada • Grade 6-Canada and Its Trading Partners

  4. HISTORY 7 and 8 Expectations are organized into the following three strands for each grade Grade 7:New France; British North America; Conflict and Change Grade 8: Confederation; The Development of Western Canada; Canada: A Changing Society

  5. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 9 and 10 HISTORY: Grade 10 Canadian History since WWI (Academic and Applied) Expectations are organized into five strands: • Communities: Local, National, and Global • Change and Continuity • Citizenship and Heritage • Social, Economic, and Political Structures • Methods of Historical Inquiry

  6. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 9 and 10 CIVICS: Grade 10 Expectations are organized into three strands: • Informed Citizenship • Purposeful Citizenship • Active Citizenship

  7. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 11 (History) Grade 11: American History (University) World History to the 16th Century (University/College) Canadian History and Politics since 1945 (College) Canadian History and Politics since 1945 (Workplace) World History since 1900: Global and Regional Perspectives (Open)

  8. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 12 (History) Grade 12: Canada: History, Identity and Culture (University) World History: The West and the World (University) (16th century to the Present) World History: The West and the World (College) (16th century to the Present) Adventures in World History (Workplace) (Earliest Times to the Present)

  9. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 11 and 12 (Politics) Grade 11: Canadian Politics and Citizenship (Open) Grade 12: Canadian and World Politics (University)

  10. CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 11 and 12 (Law) Grade 11: • Understanding Canadian Law (Uni/Coll. Prep.) • Understanding Canadian Law (Workplace Prep.) Grade 12: • Canadian and International Law (University Prep.)

  11. Curriculum Documents • Acquaint yourself with the curriculum document • Recognize that curricula are constructed based on discussion and decision-making • Recognize that this is the “current” version of the curriculum  it will change in the future

  12. Curriculum Documents • You are responsible for addressing the expectations in the curriculum document for your assigned grade level course • The curriculum document is a guide to assist you in your teaching  it is NOT a manual • Take control of the curriculum and use it to achieve the goals you design for your class

  13. Designing Your Own History Program • Familiarize yourself with the Overall and Specific Expectations of each strand in your subject and grade • Construct your units with this information and then ensure that they fulfill overall expectations • Use specific expectations as the content that “fills out” or supports overall expectations

  14. Designing Your Own History Program • Interpret expectations liberally • E.g., Overall Expectation  By the end of the course, students will: • Demonstrate an understanding of Canada’s participation in war, peace, and security • Using the specific expectations to assist, you can decide how best to address this overall expectation

  15. Designing Your Own History Program • Bring expectations together from many strands where possible • Integrate expectations from other subjects where possible. Especially if you teach other subjects to the same students • Remember that you only have to “address” an expectation once during the year

  16. Designing Your Own History Program • Recognize that all expectations are not created equally (some are far more serviceable or have more importance than others depending on the “vision(s)” you’ve designed for your course

  17. Designing Your Own History Program • Remember that when the curriculum offers you suggestions…you are not required to use those suggestions…nor should you necessarily feel any compulsion to address all suggestions – but they are a good guide!

  18. Designing Your Own History Program • Further, the curriculum GUIDE does not specify HOW you are to fulfill curricular expectations • You decide based on your students, your teaching style, the context in which you are teaching (the big circle), and your vision for teaching history.

  19. In-Class Activity • As a table group, choose one overall expectation from any 11-12 history, politics or law course. Do not look at the specific expectations at all • Discuss what specific content/topics students could POSSIBLY explore  Jot down your ideas • Discuss what strategies students could engage in to learn this content and fulfill this requirement  Jot down your ideas

  20. In-class activity • Re-examine your content topics to meet the overall expectations. • Do they best reflect social initiation or social reformation? • If they do not match the purpose or approach you feel is important re: your vision for teaching history then reshape topics to better reflect your purposes.

  21. In-class activity • Re-examine your activities/strategies you suggested to meet the overall expectations. • Do they best reflect personal development or academic understanding? • If they do not match the purpose or approach you feel is important re: your vision for teaching history then reshape activities/strategies to better reflect your purposes.

  22. In-Class Activity 4. Examine all the specific expectations in thiscourse. Have your ideas covered any of the specific expectations listed, either in whole or in part? 5. Jot down which ones. 6. Prepare to share your responses.