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Introduction to Project Management

Introduction to Project Management

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Introduction to Project Management

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  1. Introduction to Project Management August 24 & 25, 2010 Presented by: Joanne Cobb Ginny Montgomery Dan Druliner

  2. Course Outline • Introductions • What is a Project? • What is Project Management? • How does Project Management fit in F2? • Key Information, Terms, and Roles • Project Life Cycle • Initiate • Plan • Execute • Control • Close • What Skills does a Project Manager need to possess? • What Tools can I use to assist me? • Labs / Case Studies • Resources and Certification • LEAN Methodology

  3. Introductions • Your name • Your department • Current job role • What do you hope to learn in this class?

  4. What is a Project? • Definitions: • Project (characteristics-PMBOK*) • A project is finite —having specific start and completion dates—and is undertaken to create a unique product or service which brings about beneficial change or added value. This finite characteristic of projects stands in sharp contrast to processes, which are (semi) permanent functional work to repetitively produce the same product or service. Projects are delivered under certain constraints, traditionally listed as "scope," "time," and "cost.” • Temporary • Unique results • Progressive elaboration *Project Management Institute (PMI): PMBOK = Project Management Body of Knowledge

  5. Project Management Definition “Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, and managing resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives. The primary challenge of project management is to achieve all of the project goals and objectives while honoring the preconceived project constraints. Typical constraints are scope, time, and budget.” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

  6. Strategy Map - Finance & Facilities 2008-2013 • Version. May 7th, 2010 Vision We are a global leader able to deliver outstanding service anywhere, anytime Values: Integrity • Collaboration • Innovation • Diversity • Excellence • Respect • Teamwork Mission We help people who change the world Value to Our Customers Provide value for your money Help solve complex University-wide problems Provide clear, timely, accurate, consistent communications from knowledgeable staff Attract and Retain a Talented and Diverse Staff Improve Operational Excellence Recognize performance excellence Develop customer value proposition Lead strategic UW-wide projects Champion environmental stewardship Create and maintain collaborative relationships Enhance leadership effectiveness Develop individuals to their full potential Improve, streamline and innovate Enhance Resources Manage resources to support strategic priorities Provide key input for informed decisions on financial & physical assets Grow and steward UW’s assets

  7. Project Management in F2 • Improve Operational Excellence • Lead UW-wide Strategic Projects • Typically, skilled Project Managers are selected to lead these initiatives • Project Managers provide: • Leadership • Scope Control • Project Communication • Resource Management • Meeting Facilitation • Schedule Control • Issue and Risk Management • … and more!

  8. What is a Project Manager? • “Project managers function as bandleaders who pull together their players each a specialist with individual score and internal rhythm. Under the leader's direction, they all respond to the same beat.” L.R. Sayles • Project managers have the responsibility of the planning, implementation, and closing of any project in a variety of industries or fields, i.e., healthcare, insurance, construction, etc. • A project manager is the person accountable for accomplishing the stated project objectives. • Key project manager responsibilities include creating clear and attainable project objectives, building the project requirements, and managing the triple constraint for projects, which is cost, time, and scope. • A project manager ensures that the key issues of cost, time, quality and above all, Executive Sponsor satisfaction, can be realized.

  9. What is a Process vs. a Project?

  10. F2 Quality Improvement – How does this fit with Project Management? • F2 Quality Improvement Principles (note: QI Principles are applied to any project you are assigned)

  11. As a Project Manager - What do you Manage? • Schedule • The project timeline, identifying the dates (absolute or relative to a start date) that project tasks will be started and completed, resources will be required and upon which milestones will be reached. • Scope • Project scope involves identifying and describing the work that is needed to produce the deliverables of the project in sufficient detail to ensure that: • All the appropriate work is completed • And ONLY the appropriate work is completed • Resources • Team Members who perform project work • Executive Sponsor and Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, Oversight) expectations

  12. ‘The Triple Constraint’

  13. Project Phases

  14. PLAN DO CHECK ACT F2 Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Execute Control Close • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters) • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training • Execute – do the work defined in plans • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management) • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve STEAM adopted, 2009

  15. Key Terms • Project Components • Charter • Goals and objectives • Deliverable • Scope Definition • Requirements (business and functional) • Risks and Issues • Communication plan • Resource Identification • Work Plan (tasks, dependencies) • Change Control • Commonly used terms • Bandwidth • Vet • Scope creep • Metrics

  16. Key Terms (cont.) • People • Sponsors, Executive Sponsors • Stakeholders • Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, and Oversight) • Work Groups • PM Tools and activities • Risk Assessment (planning) • Flow Chart • Process Flow • Business process re-engineering • Process map • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS - planning) • Timeline/Milestones (planning) • Triple Constraint/Resource Triangle (planning) • Other • SMART Goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely) • LEAN Methodology

  17. Roles in the project framework • Sponsor/Executive Sponsor • Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, and Oversight) • Project Manager • Operational Staff: • Adviser/Subject Experts/Business Analyst • Operational Manager • Key Resource • Work Groups • Project Team Leader • Team/Member

  18. PM Skills: Key to success Planning (I – P) Communication (I – P – E– C) Resource Management (E – C) Team Management (P – E – C) Scope Management (E – C) Schedule Management (P – E) Initiate – Plan – Execute – Close

  19. Key Success Factors (STEAM): Project Management at UW • Results focused • Action plan with timeline • Communication is key • Relationships are important and need to be proactively worked • Person leading the project needs to be intimately involved and knowledgeable • The more input users/process partners, etc can provide, the better – this about teamwork, not committee work • Clear and defined project roles such as project leader, coordinator, Steering Committee, User Groups, etc. are needed • It helps to have a project manager!

  20. What’s Unique about Project Management in F2? • Cross-campus notification / communication • Don’t forget: Bothell and Tacoma • Multi-role Resources • Project Leader assists with Project Management • Verifying you have all resources • Cross-campus training • Facilities are available to all campus resources • Weighted to upper and lower campus – several sessions may be needed

  21. Introduction to Project Management F2 Approach Initiate Phase

  22. Project Phases

  23. PLAN DO CHECK ACT F2 Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Execute Control Close • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters) • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training • Execute – do the work defined in plans • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management) • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve STEAM adopted, 2009

  24. PHASE: Initiate • Phase Introduction • Key PM Universal Skills for this Phase • Any tools to assist me? • Case Study • Overview • Tools for Success • LAB

  25. INITIATE Phase Definition “The initiation processes determine the nature and scope of the project. If this stage is not performed well, it is unlikely that the project will be successful in meeting the business’ needs. The key project controls needed here are an understanding of the business environment and making sure that all necessary controls are incorporated into the project. Any deficiencies should be reported and a recommendation should be made to fix them.” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

  26. INITIATE Phase Definition (con’t) The initiate phase should include a plan that encompasses the following areas: • Analyzing the business needs/requirements in measurable goals • Reviewing of the current operations • Financial analysis of the costs and benefits including a budget • Stakeholder analysis, including users, and support personnel for the project • Project charter including costs, tasks, deliverables, and schedule en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

  27. What is Accomplished in this First Project Phase? • Executive Sponsor / Support is provided for the project initiative • Project Objectives and initial Scope are communicated • Charter is created • Executive approval is granted • Project Manager is assigned • Project Team identified • Sponsor / Project Leader/ Steering Committee • Guiding Team / Work Groups • All Stakeholders identified • ‘High-level’ Schedule and Budget • Requirements documentation • Alternatives Analysis is initiated or completed • Project Kick-off Meeting

  28. Key Project Manager Skills - Initiate • Analytical • The Project Charter accurately describes the stated goals and objectives • Exploration of any additional requirements and/or key resources • Communicator • Ability to clearly communicate the goals and objectives of the project to all stakeholders • Verification with Executive Sponsor / Project Leader project concerns, timeline, and establishment of communication cycle • Facilitator • Project Kick-off Meeting • Team consensus with Project Objectives and Goals • Mediator • Project timing may require some key team member concerns regarding their current workload – discussion with their management to ensure project commitment and priority

  29. Initiate Tools • Project Charter • Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart • Requirements or Functional documentation • ‘High-level’ Schedule and Budget • Issues or initial ‘Risks’ identified • Alternative Analysis • Decision-making tool to determine which ‘option’ is best to pursue • Project Kick-off Meeting • Right Resources invited • Agenda • Review of Project Charter / Requirements Documentation • Project Status Report • Usually weekly or monthly project status of timeline, budget, scope, key accomplishments to-date and issues/risks to all key stakeholders

  30. Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Charts (Samples)

  31. Executive Sponsor – V ’ Ella Warren Sponsor – Ann Anderson Business Steward – Karen Long Lisa Yeager, Erick Winger, Bill Shirey, Gary Prohaska, Heriberto Rodriguez, Jan Sullivan Business Advisory Group SIO Coach/Mentor Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner, Pat Bonner Sara Gomez, Karen Long, Jeanne Marie Isola , Jan Sullivan, Erick Winger Project Manager Erick Winger Technical Project eTravel Process Manager Improvement Team Jan Sullivan eTravel Customer Support Team Application Developers Rebecca Tseng Heriberto Rodriguez HERITAGE eTravel Project Example Executive Sponsor Executive Sponsor – – V V ’ ’ Ella Ella Warren Warren Sponsor Sponsor – – Ann Anderson Ann Anderson Business Steward Business Steward – – Karen Long Karen Long Technical Advisory Technical Advisory Business Advisory Business Advisory Group Group Group Group Strategic Initiative Office Leadership SIO Coach/Mentor Pat Bonner, Jelena Curless , Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner, Ann Anderson, Lisa Yeager, Pat Bonner Jeanne Marie Isola , Gary Prohaska Sara Gomez, Karen Long, Bill Shirey, Karen Long, Heriberto Rodriguez, Paul Schurr , Jeanne Marie Isola , Jan Sullivan, Heriberto Rodriguez , Jan Sullivan, Bill Shirey , Jan Sullivan, Erick Winger Erick Winger, Cindy Gregovich David Wright, Gary Prohaska Erick Winger Project Manager Project Manager Erick Winger Erick Winger Technical Project Technical Project eTravel eTravel Process Process Manager Manager Improvement Team Improvement Team Jan Sullivan eTravel eTravel Customer Customer Support Team Support Team INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Application Application Developers Developers ARIBA HERITAGE Rebecca Tseng Heriberto Rodriguez SYSTEMS Heriberto Rodriguez HERITAGE

  32. Process Improvement Team e.g., Global Emergency Mgmt Website/portal Development Single Point of Contact • Global Support Project Example Executive Sponsors Provost Senior Vice President, Finance and Facilities Project Sponsors Executive Vice Provost Vice Provosts for: Research, Student Life, Global Affairs, Undergrad Academic Affairs, Grad School Project Advisors Attorney General’s Office Environmental Health & Safety Internal Audit Risk Management Core Steering Team • Senior staff from key admin support depts. • Senior school & college administrators • Provost’s Office Faculty Consulting Team Faculty active in global research & education Rapid Response

  33. UW Climate Action Plan Team Example

  34. Case Study • Focus on: Project Kick-off Meeting • What is a Project Kick-off Meeting and why important? • Who should attend? • The Project Charter and Team Buy-in • Tools for Success • Lab

  35. What is a Project Kick-off Meeting? “Of all the things I've done, the most vital is coordinating the talents of those who work for us and pointing them towards a certain goal.” Walt Disney Meeting conducted with all key team members / sponsors / stakeholders Provides Team introductions and is the first step in ‘teambuilding’ Sets Team ‘ground rules’ and expectations Allows for review of Project Charter and all information and/or documentation on the project objectives, goals, scope and initial timing/budget

  36. What is a Project Kick-off Meeting? (Con’t) • Allows Team Members to discuss any concerns and provides: • Clarification of project requirements or goals; • Collection of initial issues/risks/parking lot items; • Determination of the team that will be involved in the planning; • Expectation of next steps and/or meeting schedule.

  37. Setting Up a Project Kick-off Meeting • Getting the right people (resources) to the meeting! • Review the Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart • Think ‘outside the box’: • Will your project have Audit implications? • Is Internal Audit part of the Team? • Will an application need to be built through UW IT? • Have you identified all key IT resources? • Will training be provided to all campus? • Have Bothell and Tacoma been taken into consideration? • Who will build the Training plan? • Discuss with your Project Leader / Sponsors to ensure that the right team members are at the meeting

  38. Tools for Success: Project Kick-off Team

  39. Setting Up a Project Kick-off Meeting (Con’t) • An Agenda • The Agenda should contain key project information: • Meeting Location / Date and Time • Name of Project • Project Sponsor / Leader • Project Manager • Project Objectives / Goals • Approach • Key Stakeholders • As Project Manager, your responsibility to ensure that all key resources are present at this meeting!

  40. Tools for Success: Project Kick-off • Remember…forming may be the work of the sponsors • but the team dynamics & team behavior are the responsibility of the Project Manager.

  41. Tools for Success: Project Team Management Skills • Team management Tools and Skills

  42. Tools for Success: Sample Agenda

  43. Tools for Success: Sample Checklist

  44. LAB

  45. Introduction to Project Management F2 Approach Plan Phase

  46. Project Phases

  47. PLAN DO CHECK ACT F2 Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Execute Control Close • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters) • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training • Execute – do the work defined in plans • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management) • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve STEAM adopted, 2009

  48. PHASE: Planning • Phase Introduction • Key PM Universal Skills for this Phase • Any tools to assist me? • Case Study • Overview • Tools for Success • LAB

  49. PLAN Phase Definition “After the initiation stage, the project is planned to an appropriate level of detail. The main purpose is to plan time, cost and resources adequately to estimate the work needed and to effectively manage risk during project execution. As with the Initiation process group, a failure to adequately plan greatly reduces the project's chances of successfully accomplishing its goals.” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

  50. What is Accomplished in this Second Project Phase? Determining how to plan (i.e., what level of detail); Refining the scope statement and identified requirements; Selecting the planning team; Identifying deliverables and creating the work breakdown structure; Identifying the activities needed to complete those deliverables and networking the activities in their logical sequence; Estimating the resource requirements for the activities; Estimating time and cost for activities; Developing the schedule; Developing the budget; Developing and implementing the communication plan; Risk planning; Gaining formal approval to begin work.