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Equipment Rollover Susan B. Harwood Grant Training Program

Equipment Rollover Susan B. Harwood Grant Training Program

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Equipment Rollover Susan B. Harwood Grant Training Program

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  1. Equipment RolloverSusan B. Harwood Grant Training Program Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  2. Equipment RolloverSusan B. Harwood Grant Training Program Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  3. Disclaimer/Usage Notes • Photos shown in this presentation may depict situations that are not in compliance with applicable OSHA requirements. • It is not the intent of the content developers to provide compliance-based training in this presentation, or to train employees how to operate the equipment depicted. The intent is more to address hazard awareness in the construction industry, and to recognize the overlapping hazards present in many construction workplaces. • It should NOT be assumed that the suggestions, comments, or recommendations contained herein constitute a thorough review of the applicable standards, nor should discussion of “issues” or “concerns” be construed as a prioritization of hazards or possible controls. Where opinions (“best practices”) have been expressed, it is important to remember that safety issues in general and construction jobsites specifically will require a great deal of site- or hazard-specificity – a “one size fits all” approach is not recommended, nor will it likely be very effective. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  4. Disclaimer/Usage Notes • No representation is made as to the thoroughness of the presentation, nor to the exact methods of remediation to be taken. It is understood that site conditions vary constantly, and that the developers of this content cannot be held responsible for safety problems they did not address or could not anticipate, nor those which have been discussed herein or during physical presentation. It is the responsibility of the employer, its subcontractors, and its employees to comply with all pertinent rules and regulations in the jurisdiction in which they work. Copies of all OSHA regulations are available from your local OSHA office, and many pertinent regulations and supporting documents have been provided with this presentation in electronic or printed format. This presentation is intended to discuss Federal Regulations only - your individual State requirements may be more stringent. • It is assumed that individuals using this presentation or content to augment their training programs will be “qualified” to do so, and that said presenters will be otherwise prepared to answer questions, solve problems, and discuss issues with their audiences. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  5. Disclaimer/Usage Notes • As a presenter, you should be prepared to discuss all of the potential issues/concerns, or problems inherent in those photos with the students Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  6. Why Require Training? • Operator training is required by: • OSHA • Manufacturers • Clients • Employers Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  7. Why Is Training Needed? • OSHA investigated two fatal accidents in 2005 in southern Colorado involving the rollover of pneumatic rubber-tired roller/compactors Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  8. Accident #1 • May 2005 • Employee was fatally injured while operating a pneumatic rubber-tired roller Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  9. Accident #1 • Roller ran off the road and traveled down a 22-degree embankment • Rolled over 1½ times, stopped on its top • Operator was thrown from the machine • Fatally crushed between the machine and ground Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  10. Accident #1 • Roller was originally equipped with a ROPS and a seatbelt • Both had been removed prior to the accident Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  11. Accident #2 • August 2005 • Employee was rolling material into the gravel using a pneumatic rubber-tired roller Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  12. Accident #2 • Roller ran off the road and down a 28-degree embankment • Compactor rolled onto its side and came to a stop • Operator was thrown from the machine and fatally crushed • Roller was not provided with a ROPS, operator not wearing a seatbelt Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  13. Summary of Accidents • In both cases, • If the machine had been equipped with a ROPS system, and • If the operator had been wearing a seatbelt, The operator’s survival would have increased significantly Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  14. Additional Accidents • Between 2000 and 2006 • OSHA investigated over 50 rollover incidents Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  15. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  16. Roller Compactor Safety • Always be aware that a rollover hazard exists • ROPS and seatbelts ALWAYS reduce the risk of a fatality • Highest hazard locations were roadway or embankment edges Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  17. Roller Compactor Safety • When operating on uneven surfaces, chances of a rollover increase • Another hazard was runaway machines, typically down slopes • Evaluate roadways and work surfaces for dangerous inclines/declines Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  18. ROPS • A ROPS is a protective frame mounted on the machine and extends above the operator’s seat • ROPS bear the weight of the machine during a rollover event • ROPS minimize the likelihood that the machine will overturn completely Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  19. ROPS • A principle in ROPS design is to restrict the overturn to 90 degrees • ROPS must to be used in combination with a seatbelt • A ROPS only provides protection if the operator remains in the seat Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  20. Roller Compactor Safety • A number of hazards associated with rollovers were pointed out, including: • Working near road edge or embankment was the most hazardous • The second most hazardous were steep slopes and roadway curves • Problems with gear-shifting and brakes resulted in runaways Source: Compactor Overturns and Rollover Protective Structures Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  21. Roller Compactor Safety • Compacting soil appeared to be more hazardous than other operations • Hazards included the soil edges and soft soil pockets that could drop under the weight of the unit. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  22. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  23. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  24. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  25. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  26. Compactor Roller Safety • Loading and unloading machines onto trailers posed a potential overturn hazard • Hazards were caused by • skidding on the ramps, • using wood blocks or planks as ramps, • or a machine that was too narrow to span both sides of the ramp Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  27. What is this in the background? Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  28. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  29. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  30. Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  31. Need for ROPS • Studies show that if the machines involved are equipped with ROPS, and if the operators are wearing seatbelts, the operator’s survival increases significantly Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  32. Regulations • OSHA does not have a standard requiring the use ROPS or seatbelts • OSHA’s position is that the hazard of equipment rollover is a “recognized hazard” within the meaning of the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  33. General Duty Clause (a) Each employer --(1) shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees;(2) shall comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  34. General Duty Clause (b) Each employee shall comply with occupational safety and health standards and all rules, regulations, and orders issued pursuant to this Act which are applicable to his own actions and conduct Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  35. Other Regulations • 29 CFR 1926.20(b)(4), states “the employer shall permit only those employees qualified by training or experience to operate equipment and machinery.” Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  36. Other Regulations • 29 CFR 1926.21(b)(2), “Safety training and education,” states further that “the employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions….” Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  37. Compactor Roller Safety • Employers performing construction work are required to ensure that their operators are trained; • To use the equipment properly and • To understand how to recognize those situations and conditions that pose a rollover hazard Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  38. Compactor Roller Safety • For example, operators need to understand that: • Soft edges can cause one side of the equipment to sink and therefore may pose a risk of rollover; • Turning away from a slope with articulated steering can destabilize the compactor; Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  39. Compactor Roller Safety • Improperly inflated tires can destabilize roller/compactors; and • Rain or wet conditions can pose a hazard during unloading and loading • and can increase the possibility of rollovers near embankments as soil conditions become unstable Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  40. Roller Compactor Safety • Leaving a compactor vibrator engaged while stationary has led to the settling of soil on one side of the unit, allowing it to overturn • Articulation of a mobile unit with the jackknife pointed toward an edge presents a substantial overturn hazard Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  41. Roller Compactor Safety • Remember to always think safety, the life you save may be your own • Always use ROPS and seat belts • Now we will review as well as discuss proper procedures for operating your machine Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  42. Safety is Important • Three reasons Safety is important : • Accidents can cause death or serious injuries, or disability, • Accidents can cost both you, and your employer • With proper training, and with Machine Operators making it their responsibility to work safely, accidents can be prevented Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  43. Safety Alerts • The Safety Alert Symbol is used to; • Identify important safety messages • Alert you to the possibility of injury or death Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  44. Safety Alerts • Follow the instructions in the safety message to prevent injury to yourself or others Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  45. Manufacturer’s Manual • States that you must be qualified and authorized to operate the machine • YOU must • understand the manufacturers instructions • be trained • demonstrate the actual operation of the machine • know the safety rules and regulations Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  46. Signal Words • DANGER - indicates an imminently hazardous situation that will result in death or serious injury • WARNING –indicates a potentially hazardous situation which could result in death or serious injury • CAUTION –indicates a potentially hazardous situation that may result in minor or moderate injury Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  47. A Word to the Operator Remember that Safety is up to YOU, only YOU can prevent serious injury or death Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  48. Follow a Safety Program • Protect yourself by wearing the appropriate PPE • Hard hats, safety glasses, hearing protection • WARNING! – Do not wear loose fitting or dangling clothes • Be Careful • Encourage those around you to act safely Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  49. Safe Operation • Drugs or alcohol use can change your alertness or coordination • Consult with your medical advisor if you are taking prescription or over-the-counter medication • Ensure you can safely operate the machine • Check the label for warnings against operating machinery Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter

  50. Know the Safety Rules • Your employer on the job site will have rules on the proper operation of equipment • Check with your supervisor or safety coordinator to learn the rules for your job site Developed under an OSHA Susan B. Harwood Grant, #SH-19499-09-60-F-48, by the Associated Builders and Contractors-Central Texas Chapter