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Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan METRO Blue Line Extension 45-day Comment DRAFT PowerPoint Presentation
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Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan METRO Blue Line Extension 45-day Comment DRAFT

Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan METRO Blue Line Extension 45-day Comment DRAFT

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Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan METRO Blue Line Extension 45-day Comment DRAFT

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  1. Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan METRO Blue Line Extension45-day Comment DRAFT Harrison Community Center - October 12, 2017

  2. METRO Blue Line Extension

  3. Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan Draft (2017) Station Area Boundaries

  4. Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan Draft (2017) Station Area Boundaries

  5. Station Area and LRT System

  6. What Has Been Done to Date? • June 2015 – Draft County-City Bottineau LRT Station Area Planning released • July – December 2015 – Bassett Creek Valley Redevelopment Oversight Committee approved land use changes in Bassett Creek Valley to allow for commercial, office, and certain “maker” and creative uses • September 2017 – Van White Station Area Plan out for public review • http://minneapolismn.gov/cped/projects/vanwhitestationareaplan

  7. City-County Draft Plan for Van White and Penn Ave Revised to Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan

  8. Why Revise the Draft City-County Plan? • To put into format more easily legible by City staff and policy makers. • To address planning issues along Olson Memorial Highway. • To address land use issues in Bassett Creek Valley

  9. Broad Goals of the Van White SAP • Promote a multi-cultural community providing sustainable urban living that is poised for future growth that is supportive of new residential, retail, and employment. • Create mixed-income and mixed-use neighborhoods where people have the option of using transit, have housing choice, and have access to neighborhood serving retail and services. • Provide a range of density and housing types that supports housing choice and neighborhood-serving retail.

  10. Broad Goals of the Van White SAP • Create opportunity for new residents to live in the area, while preserving the ability of existing residents to stay in neighborhood. • Enhance pedestrian and bicycle friendly neighborhoods by incorporating green space, improving safety, and providing connectivity to stations to create a walkable area that knits together the design of new development, Olson Memorial Highway, and the Blue Line Extension. • Capitalize on development opportunity created by LRT investment, especially on the large tracts of publically-owned land available in the station area.

  11. Chapter 1 Introduction

  12. Transit investments and station area planning can help narrow social and economic disparities. • The LRT system connects residents to the larger metropolitan area and all of the educational and employment opportunities that entails. • Station area planning promotes redevelopment of safe, walkable, mixed use neighborhoods that have retail sales and services and housing choice for its residents. • If done comprehensively it allows the opportunity of living without the cost burden of having to own a car.

  13. Chapter 2 Transit Oriented Development

  14. The introduction and construction of new high-volume transit is a once in a generation opportunity that will support development, housing, choice, commercial services, and employment opportunities. • There is a great deal of existing developable land that is within 5‐10 minutes walking distance of the station platform. Much of that land is in relatively large parcels ‐ parcels which are vacant and do not require building clearance. • This means that a significant amount of new development in this neighborhood can be built without having to buy or demolish existing homes or businesses. • Much of the available land is within public ownership by the City of Minneapolis (CPED), the Minneapolis Public Housing Authority (MPHA), Hennepin County, or the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT).  

  15. New residential development should primarily focus on creating mixed-income neighborhoods, which includes market rate housing. • Existing affordable housing units for current residents should be preserved. • New affordable housing is encouraged to replace existing affordable housing lost due to redevelopment, rising rents, or as part of mixed-income developments. • Retail sales and services are the priority land use for the first floor of mixed-use buildings on parcels near the station platform. Encourage and support retail sales and services that provide “last mile” services for residents. • Non-residential uses should be job-intensive with living wages for employees. • Requests for Proposals and development of public land should ensure balanced development that includes (where applicable) neighborhood serving retail, accentuates and expands income diversity, meets employment targets, provides housing choice, and preserves affordable housing options.

  16. Affordable Housing • We heard that there is a concern of displacement of current residents, and the need for affordable housing options. • Study is underway by City departments to look at a comprehensive way to preserve affordable housing, improve tenant rights & protections, and support existing rental housing stability. • City Council staff directive on August 3rd, 2017 to report back on strategies • Ongoing effort to look at land use and housing policies to address displacement in the Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan • A document that shapes how Minneapolis will grow and change, which covers issues such as housing, job creation, the design of new buildings, and how we use our streets.

  17. Chapter 4 Land UseExisting Land Use Plan – Minneapolis Near Northside Master Plan (2000)

  18. Chapter 4 Land Use Existing Land Use Plan – Bassett Creek Valley Master Plan (2007)

  19. Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan Draft (2017) Proposed Future Land Use

  20. Low Density Residential – Areas that are primarily single-and two-family residential, but may also have smaller cluster and townhome development. Density range is 8-20 dwelling units per acre. Medium Density Residential - Areas that allow multi-family at 20-50 dwelling units per acre. Medium to High Density Residential – Areas that allow multi-family residential at 20-120 dwelling units per acre. Mixed Use Medium to High Density Residential – Allows for mixed-use development, including mixed-use with residential. Mixed-use may include a mix of commercial, office, or residential uses within a building or a district. There is not a requirement that every building be mixed-use. Where residential is present, it is at densities of 20-120 dwelling units per acre. Mixed Use Medium to High Density Residential/Flex Space – Allows for mixed use development, including mixed use with residential. Mixed use may include a mix of commercial, office, production, processing, and warehousing flex space, or residential uses within a building or a district. There is not a requirement that every building be mixed use. Where residential is present, it is at densities of 20-120 dwelling units per acre. Production, processing, and warehousing flex space uses are environmentally friendly, job-intensive, and transit oriented uses that may require light industrial zoning, as their scale would be larger than the production, processing, and warehousing use allowed in commercial districts. While warehousing is allowed, it is not intended to be the sole use of a building and should be designed so it can transition to more productive and job intensive uses in the future. Not zoning, but guides what zoning districts could be appropriate.

  21. Van White Boulevard Station Area Plan Draft (2017) Proposed Future Development Intensity

  22. Neighborhood Scale development district - supports low to medium-density development types in the existing residential neighborhoods. Includes single and two-family homes and Accessory Dwelling Units and in some areas and townhomes, cluster developments, or small apartment buildings may be appropriate. Urban Scale development district - supports medium-density development at three to four-story building heights. Taller heights may will be evaluated utilizing the conditional use permit process and standards. Transit Scale development district - supports the highest density development and suggests building heights of five-stories or greater. Due to soils, flood plain, water table, and environmental issues in the station area, taller buildings may be necessary to allow for development of certain parcels and would be evaluated utilizing the conditional use permit process and standards. The parcels nearest the LRT stations (both Blue and Green Line) are sites where the tallest buildings would be appropriate. On these parcels height (10-15 stories, or taller) is encouraged to meet the mixed-income, mixed-use, TOD goals of the plan.

  23. Chapter 3 TransportationChapter 5 Urban Design

  24. Next Steps 45 day Public Review and Comment: September 1, 2017, through October 16, 2017 City Planning Commission Public Hearing: November 13, 2017 Zoning and Planning Committee of the City Council: November 30, 2017 City Council: December 18, 2017 Comprehensive Plan in 2018 will include these changes to land use, city revisions to zoning to match the land use will follow.

  25. Questions or Comments Jim Voll – City of Minneapolis, CPED – Long Range Planning 612-673-3887 James.voll@minneapolismn.gov Rattana Sengsoulichanh – City of Minneapolis, CPED – Long Range Planning 612-673-5046 Rattana.sengsoulichanh@minneapolismn.gov