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Susan Barrett Sheppard Pratt Health System OSEP Center on PBIS Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis pbis pbismaryland PowerPoint Presentation
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Susan Barrett Sheppard Pratt Health System OSEP Center on PBIS Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis pbis pbismaryland

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Susan Barrett Sheppard Pratt Health System OSEP Center on PBIS Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis pbis pbismaryland

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  1. Using School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SW-PBS) to Build Sustainable Systems within Alternative School Settings Susan Barrett Sheppard Pratt Health System OSEP Center on PBIS Rob Horner, George Sugai, Tim Lewis www.pbis.org www.pbismaryland.org

  2. Organizer • Overview of PBIS- How do you get teachers to implement best practices with fidelity? How do you achieve your annual performance goals? • State Example- What is going on in your state? How can you link with state or local initiative? • School Examples- What does this look like in alternative settings? • Questions • Inauguration

  3. www.pbis.org

  4. School-wide Positive Behavior Support:Current Implementation • School-wide Positive Behavior Support • 7500 schools in 44 states • Team • Coach • Curriculum emphasizing prevention: Define and teach appropriate social behavior to all students • Formal system for rewarding appropriate behavior • Intensive, individual interventions based on behavioral function • On-going data collection and use of data for active decision-making

  5. 7500 Schools across 44 states implementing school-wide positive behavior support

  6. Need to Know • Cultural fit • Building on “What works” • Focus on the Staff

  7. Worry #1 • Do we live in a punishing work environment ? • How do we create systems that support staff?

  8. Predictable work environments are places where employees: • Know what is expected • Have materials & equipment to do job correctly • Receive recognition each week for good work • Have supervisor who cares & pays attention • Receive encouragement to contribute & improve • Can identify person at work who is “best friend” • Feels mission of organization makes them feel like their jobs are important • See people around them committed to doing good job • Feel like they are learning new things • Have opportunity to do the job well (Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup)

  9. Many Begin, Many LeaveAdelman and TaylorPreparing All Education Personnel to Address Barriers to Learning and Teaching2008 Predictions of shortages of 2 million educators over the next decade… Data in the U.S. indicate about 15% of new teachers leave in the first year, 30% within three years and 40-50% within the first five years. (Smith and Ingersoll, 2003)

  10. On school reform… Kauffman states “…attempts to reform education will make little difference until reformers understand that schools must exist as much for teachers as for student. Put another way, schools will be successful in nurturing the intellectual, social, and moral development of children only to the extent that they also nurture such development of teachers.” (1993, p. 7).

  11. Worry #2 • Too much to do • We add more and more each year • How can we be better prepared to integrated into existing programs?

  12. MemoTo: School AdministratorsFrom: District Administrators In keeping with the new state initiative, this fall we will be implementing an exciting new district initiative of SNI in place of LYI. All in-service days previously scheduled for LYI will be rescheduled as staff development for SNI. The $500 for release time and materials for LYI will be discontinued and provided instead for SNI. By the way, you will need to create local SNI teams that meet weekly. The former members of your LYI team would be perfect for this new team. Your new SNI binders will be coming next week. Have a great year!!!

  13. 14 Initiatives • School Counseling Services • Second Step • FBA/BIP’s • School Health • Social Skills • Bully proofing • Anger Management • Student Intervention Plans • Behavioral Contracting • Character Education • 504 Plans/IEP • CICO • Responsive Classroom • Expanded School Mental Health

  14. Competing or Coordinated • Need for a framework, the anchor, for all school improvement efforts • Common language, Common logic

  15. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students 27

  16. INTENSIVE Wrap Team Student Services Team TARGETED ESMH UNIVERSAL Family Leadership Team School counseling services Second Step FBAs/BIPs School health services Social skills, bully proofing, and/or anger management groups Student Intervention Plans Behavioral contracting Health Education Voluntary State Curriculum Character Education Section 504 Plans and/or IEPs Alternative programs Check-in/Check-out Responsive counseling Bullying Prevention School mental health services Expanded School Mental Health Initiatives and Interagency Partnerships

  17. Triangle Activity: Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Your School Tier 3 Tier 2 Tier 1

  18. Triangle Activity: Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Charles Carroll Tier 3FBA / BIP IEP / 504 Wilson Reading Inclusion PD Assistive Technology Framing Your ThoughtsTouch Math Tier 2Focused Guidance Groups IST AEL, EIR, SOAR Check-in / Check-outSuccessMaker+ Behavior ContractsDouble Dose Instruction PST; PPWRIT Resource Fundations Student Intervention Plans Tier 1 PBIS Expectations Leadership TeamExplicit Instruction Chippy Coupons Inclusive School Gradual Release Model Schoolwide Celebrations Data Binders Specific Learning Targets PBIS Lesson Plans & Matrix PTA Partnership Objective Deconstruction PBIS Brochure & Home ConnectionFormative Assessment PD Character Education Community Partners Habits of Mind Focus Guidance CounselorProgress Monitoring-SIT Aligned Discipline ReferralsGrades 3-5 SuccessMaker Celebree DaycareAssessment-Data PDSA Check ClubVolunteers Yearbook ClubGr. 4-5 Geography Club

  19. Educational Initiatives • Guiding Principles (Coyne 2008) • Promoting evidence based practices • Supporting change at the systems level (feasible, consistent and relevant to local needs) • Developing local capacity to sustain effective practices over time

  20. Sample Implementation “Map”Building the System 2+ years of school team training Annual “booster” events Coaching/facilitator support @ school & district levels Regular self-assessment & evaluation data On-going preparation of trainers Development of local/district leadership teams Establishment of state/regional leadership & policy team

  21. What is School-wide Positive Behavior Support? • School-wide PBS is: • A systems approach for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for schools to be effective learning environments for all students. • Evidence-based features of SW-PBS • Prevention • Define and teach positive social expectations • Acknowledge positive behavior • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making • Continuum of intensive, individual interventions. • Administrative leadership – Team-based implementation (Systems that support effective practices)

  22. Social Responsibility & Academic Achievement Positive behavior Support Not specific practice or curriculum…it’s a general approach to preventing problem behavior and encouraging prosocial behavior OUTCOMES Not limited to any particular group of students…it’s for all students Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff behavior DATA SYSTEMS Not new…its based on long history of effective educational practices & strategies PRACTICES Supporting Student behavior

  23. Why Bother? In 1 year, 1 school (880) had 5100 ODRs, 1 student received 87 ODRs, & 1 teacher gave out 273 ODRs In 1 urban school district: 2004-05, 400 kindergartners were expelled In 1 state 55% white, 73% Latino, & 88% Black 4th graders aren’t proficient readers Many pre-service teachers have no behavior/classroom management course for teachers or administrators 1st response to school violence is “get tougher” In 1 K-3 school, no teacher could give reading levels of their students 2nd grade student receives “body sock” & “lemon drop” therapy to treat violent school behavior In 1 state 7% of “high experience” teachers & 17% of reading specialists can identify at least 2 indicators of early reading success (e.g., phonemic awareness, fluency) Across nation, students who are truant are given out-of-school suspensions

  24. 5,100 referrals = 76,500 min @15 min = 1,275 hrs = 159 days @ 8 hrs

  25. Problem Statement “We give schools strategies & systems for developing positive, effective, achieving, & caring school & classroom environments, but implementation is not accurate, consistent, or durable. Schools need more than training.”

  26. SW-PBS Logic! Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

  27. Responsiveness-to-Intervention & SWPBS

  28. GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started” Team Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  29. SWPBS Subsystems School-wide Classroom Family Non-classroom Student

  30. School-wide 1. Common purpose & approach to discipline 2. Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors 3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior 4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior 5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior 6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation

  31. SWPBS Implementers’ Blueprint Elements Visibility Political Support Funding Leadership Team Evaluation Training Coaching Local School Teams/Demonstrations

  32. Pennsylvania West Virginia Delaware D.C. Virginia

  33. State District School Classroom Student Maryland Organizational Model School Level • 467 PBIS Teams (one per school) - Team leaders (one per school) - Behavior Support Coaches (250+) District Level (24) • Regional Coordinators State Level • State Leadership Team - Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) - Sheppard Pratt Health System - Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention of Youth Violence - 24 Local school districts - Department of Juvenile Services, Mental Health Administration • Management Team • Advisory Group National Level • National PBIS Technical Assistance Center - University of Oregon & University of Connecticut

  34. Number of PBIS Schools in Maryland

  35. Where Are We In 2009?

  36. State District School Classroom Student Maryland Organizational Model School Level • 554 PBIS Teams (one per school) • Team leaders (one per school) • Behavior Support Coaches (380+)

  37. State District School Classroom Student Maryland Organizational Model School Level • 554 PBIS Teams (one per school) • Team leaders (one per school) • Behavior Support Coaches (380+) District Level (24) • Regional Coordinators State Level • State Leadership Team • Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) • Sheppard Pratt Health System • Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention of Youth Violence • 24 Local school districts • Department of Juvenile Services, Mental Health Administration • Management Team • Advisory Group National Level • National PBIS Technical Assistance Center • University of Oregon & University of Connecticut

  38. Behavioral Systems Academic Systems • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions • Strategies to address needs of individual students with intensive needs • Function-based assessments • Intense, durable strategies • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions • Address individual needs of student • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Targeted, Group Interventions • Small, needs-based groups for • at risk students who do not respond • to universal strategies • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted, Group Interventions • Small, needs-based groups for at- risk students who do not respond to universal strategies • High efficiency/ Rapid response • Function-based logic • Core Curriculum and • Differentiated Instruction • All students • Preventive, proactive • School-wide or classroom • systems for ALL students • Core Curriculum and • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive • School-wide or classroom systems for ALL students and staff Maryland’s Tiered Instructional and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Framework 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  39. PBIS MD Research Project: Project Target Design Federally funded 5-year randomized controlled trial (CDC & NIMH) 37 elementary schools in 5 districts 29,427 students and 3,563 staff Key Findings High fidelity implementation of PBIS PBIS increased school’s organizational health Staff perceptions of leadership, support, focus on academics, collegiality etc. Especially those schools starting at a slightly lower level Impact on students Reductions in office discipline referrals (60% less likely to receive an ODR) Reductions in school-level suspensions (reduced by 24%) Reduced need for counseling (34-46% less likely to need/receive counseling) Reduced need for special education (27-38% less likely to need/referred sped) Positive trend in MSA achievement (2-6 percentage points) Project Target

  40. PBISplus Project Design Federally funded 3-year randomized controlled trial (U.S.DOE) 46 elementary schools (in 6 districts) that have high fidelity PBIS & “yellow-zone” needs Random assignment to either “SWPBIS” or “Plus” condition Aims Address needs of PBIS “non-responders” Increase use of evidence-based programs Reduce inappropriate referrals to special education Reduce behavior problems & improve achievement Reduce disproportionality Strategy Provide training, support, and on-site technical assistance to SSTs and staff regarding: Simplified functional behavioral assessment and “function-based thinking” Evidence-based programs Effective teaming and collaborative problem-solving Cultural competency & culturally appropriate interventions PBISplus

  41. The need to enhance environmental structures increases The frequency for collecting and acting upon information increases The required resources to address the problem increases Core Support Program: Provided to all, intended to reach most Continuum of Supports

  42. Opportunities to Increase Visibility • The Delinquency Prevention and Diversion Services Task Force • School Safety Action Planning Committee-Twice • International School Mental Health Conference • Blueprint for Mental Health’s Emotional Disturbance Workgroup • Child Welfare Training Academy • Youth Investment Project • Pupil Personnel State meeting • Charles County Pupil Personnel Workers and Guidance/School Counselors Meeting • APBS/PBIS Implementers Forums

  43. PBIS Systems Implementation Logic Visibility Political Support Funding Leadership Team Active Coordination Evaluation Training Coaching Local School Teams/Demonstrations

  44. PBIS Maryland’s Annual Training Events • Leadership Forum • March 30, 2009 • Coaches and New Team Institute • Coaches ~ July 20, 2009 • Elementary ~ July 21-22, 2009 • Secondary ~ July 23-24, 2009 • Regional Returning Team Trainings • Central Regions 1 and 2 • Eastern Shore • Upper Shore • Western Region • Southern Region • Coaches Meetings (4/year) • Regional Team Leader/Coach Meetings (2/year) • Schools serving students with special needs - MANSEF (2/year) • High Schools – (2/year)

  45. Current Energy and Efforts • Institutionalize funding level and commitment at MSDE - Divisions of Student Services and Special Education • Pursue other funding opportunities • Expand and sustain green zone with high fidelity • Increase marketing and visibility • Implement yellow zone in districts that have solid green zone and have infrastructure to expand • Continue linkage with school mental health, Systems of Care, and wraparound efforts

  46. PBIS in Alternative School Settings Examples: Forbush, Children’s Guild, St. Elizabeth Homewood, Mary Moss

  47. Provide a Continuum of Schoolwide Support Individualized Systems Specialized Group Systems Primary Prevention School-/Classroom- Wide Systems