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Please copy the following info about the parts of speech into your English notebook.

Please copy the following info about the parts of speech into your English notebook.

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Please copy the following info about the parts of speech into your English notebook.

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  1. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Parts of Speech Please copy the following info about the parts of speech into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  2. Parts of Speech • O.k., so what are they? • Articles • Nouns • Adjectives • Verbs • Adverbs • Conjunctions • Pronouns • Prepositions • Interjections • Gerunds Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  3. That’s all I got. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  4. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Articles Please copy the following info about the articles into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  5. Articles • Articles introduce nouns: “the” is the definite article, “a” and “an” are indefinite articles. Try using them in a sentence to understand the distinction between definite and indefinite. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  6. A ferret couldbe any ferret, any- where. The ferret specifies definitely—the ferret in my jacuzzi, for example. • Articles have a simple function—to point out, or introduce, a noun. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  7. Step off, aight? Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  8. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Nouns Please copy the following info about nouns into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  9. Nouns Nouns, as we all know, are “people, places, and things” type of words. It’s easy to see that objects are nouns—things such as pencils, uvulas, televisions, yo’ momma. But abstract things such as qualities and ideas can be nouns too—love is a noun, and egotism, and spoilage. Nouns can be . . . Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  10. singular, when you are talking about one thing (moco) and nouns can be plural, when you’re talking about more than one thing (mocos). Being able to spot nouns is important because the subject of a sentence is always a noun or a pronoun (we’ll cover pronouns in a little while). Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  11. That concludes today’s studies! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  12. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Adjectives Please copy the following info about adjectives into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  13. Adjectives Adjectives are descriptive words. Gorgeous, hideous, smelly, crunk, baggy, and pathetic are all adjectives because they describe, or modify, nouns. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  14. Less obvi- ously descrip- tive are adjectives that show which one or how many: that player, her braids, enough chalupas, every ferret. See how the adjectives clarify which noun (or how many of each noun) is being talked about? Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  15. Slow your roll! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  16. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Verbs Please copy the following info about verbs into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  17. Verbs Without a verb, you have no sentence. Verbs express either action, like burping, freaking, or touching, or state-of-being, like am, seems, will be. The first kind of verb is called an action verb, and the second is called a linking verb. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  18. Put another way, verbs tell what the subject is doing or what is being done to the subject, even if the subject is doing nothing more than existing, just like some of us in this class. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  19. Thank you, and goodbye! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  20. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Transitive Verbs Please copy the following info about transitive verbs into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  21. Transitive & Intransitive Verbs • A transitive verb takes a direct object (She bitme) as opposed to an intransitive verb, which doesn’t (He swam home) or (He swam in the pool). • In the dictionary, a tran-sitive verb is indicated by vt, and intransitive verb by vi. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  22. Direct Objects The direct object is not the subject of the sentence, it’s the noun receiving the action. The object isn’t doing anything, it’s having something done to it. A sentence doesn’t need a direct object to be a sentence. Example: Jenny threw the flowers. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  23. Jenny is the subject; she’s the one doing the throwing. Flowers is the object; they aren’t doing anything, but something is being done to them—they are being thrown. Ya know what I’m sayin? Explanation Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  24. I’m ghost! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  25. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Adverbs Please copy the following info about adverbs into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  26. Adverbs modify verbs (kiss passionately), adjectives (often happy), or other adverbs (too quickly). Adverbs frequently end in –ly, but the –ly isn’t a requirement. A test for determining adverbs is to think about function: adverbs tend to tell where, when, or how: Adverbs Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  27. Adverbs showing where: “Oscar’s over there.” Adverbs showing when: “Lyneal! Come here,now!” Adverbs showing how: “Hillary flatulated loudly.” Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  28. See ya! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  29. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Conjunctions Please copy the following info about conjunctions into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  30. Conjunctions connect words or parts of sentences—conjoin means to join together. Coordinating conjunctions (or matchmaking conjunctions): connect equal parts of sentences. In other words, they connect words to words, phrases to phrases, clauses to clauses. Conjunctions Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  31. A clause contains a noun and a verb. • An independent clause contains a subject and a predicate and can stand as a sentence by itself.A dependent clause contains a verb and a noun but cannot stand as a sentence by itself. A phrase is a group of words that does not have a subject and a verb. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  32. Correlative conjunctions (or seesaw conjunctions) also connect equal parts together (they are really a subcategory of match-making conjunctions). The difference is that seesaw conjunctions are really two conjunctions in one. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  33. Yes, we’re done, now! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  34. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Subordinating Conjunctions Please copy the following info about subordinating conjunctions into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  35. Subordinating Conjunctions Subordinating conjunctions (or linking conjunctions) connect dependent, or subordinate, clauses with the independent or main, clause. The subordinate clauses act as nouns or as adverbs. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  36. Chill! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  37. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Subordinating Conjunctions Please copy the following info about pronouns into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  38. Chill! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  39. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Prepositions Please copy the following info about prepositions into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  40. Prepositions Prepositions express relationships between other words, nouns usually, including relation-ships of time or space. In, of, to , and with are all prepositions. A helpful trick to determine whether a word is a preposition is to place it before the phrase “the fence.” Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  41. Beyond the fence, past the fence, over the fence, under the fence, of the fence, across the fence—all of these constructions make some kind of sense, so all the opening words are prepositions, just doing their job: defining relationships. “The fence” is the object of the preposition. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  42. Any questions? Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  43. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Prepositional Phrases Please copy the following info about prepositional phrase into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  44. Prepositional Phrases • A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and ends with a noun. Look at the following prepositional phrase: • Because he was in a bad mood (the Lakers lost, again), Joey walked quickly with a frown to class. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  45. ?with a frown also describes Joey; it, too, is an adjective phrase. ?to class describes where Joey walked. So it is an adverb phrase ? in a bad mood, describes Joey; so in a bad mood is an adjective phrase. Explanation Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  46. Explanation All of these phrases are still prepositional phrases, and prepositional phrases usually act either as adjectives or adverbs. Makes sense, doesn’t it? Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  47. Daaaang! Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  48. Things That Make Ya Go "Hmmm!" Prepositions Please copy the following info about prepositions into your English notebook. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  49. Prepositions As we know, prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.Occasion- ally prepositional phrases act as a noun. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0

  50. Identify the Subject ? Before dinner is a good time to do homework. Before dinner is the subject of the verb “is”. Remember, “Before dinner” is a prepositional phrase. Written and Oral English-Language Convention Standard 1.0