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Literacy in Content Areas 6-12

Literacy in Content Areas 6-12

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Literacy in Content Areas 6-12

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  1. Literacy in Content Areas 6-12 College and Career Readiness Standards for Content Areas Keitha Segrest Instructional/Regional Support Staff for ARI Region 6: JSU ksegrest@alsde.edu

  2. Outcome In this session you will explore and understand the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for Literacy in the content areas and discuss types of informational texts that lead to literacy in science.

  3. Alabama State Department of Education’s Mission Statement Every student a graduate – Every graduate prepared for College/Work/Adulthood in the 21st Century

  4. Of all the things that are essential to good schools nothing is more important than the individual teacher and what that person brings to classroom instruction day to day... lesson to lesson... minute to minute... (from R.B.T. “At a Glance”)

  5. PartnerBrainstorm With a partner… • brainstorm the characteristics of a prepared graduate. • What are some things the prepared graduate should be able to do?

  6. Demonstrates • independence • Understands other perspectives and cultures • Builds strong • content knowledge • Uses technology • and digital media strategically and capably • Responds to audience, task, purpose, and discipline • Values • Evidence • Comprehends as well as critiques

  7. What is Literacy? Literacy is the “ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate, compute and use printed and written materials associated with varying contexts. Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society."

  8. Reading in Content Areas?? WHY?? • While reading the given passage, “talk to the text” to determine points for conversation. • “Table Talk” your points for conversation

  9. Reading is critical to building knowledge in history/social studies as well as in science and technical subjects. College and career ready reading in these fields requires an appreciation of the norms and conventions of each discipline, such as the kinds of evidence used in history and science; an understanding of domain-specific words and phrases; an attention to precise details; and the capacity to evaluate intricate arguments, synthesize complex information, and follow detailed descriptions of events and concepts. In history/social studies, for example, students need to be able to analyze, evaluate and differentiate primary and secondary sources….

  10. When reading scientific and technical texts, students need to be able to gain knowledge from challenging texts that often make extensive use of elaborate diagrams and data to convey information and illustrate concepts. Students must be able to read complex informational texts in these fields with independence and confidence because the vast majority of reading in college and workforce training programs will be sophisticated nonfiction. It is important to note that these reading standards are meant to complement the specific content demands of the disciplines, not replace them.

  11. Challenging Text? What’s the Problem • Read the given passage and “talk to the text” to gather important details. • Jot the interferences that caused you not to be able to totally comprehend this piece of text. • Discuss your thoughts with a partner

  12. College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading

  13. Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

  14. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyzehow two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

  15. Let’s Take a Closer Look

  16. College and Career Readiness Standards for Writing

  17. Text Types and Purposes* 1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

  18. Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  19. Let’s Take a Closer Look

  20. Your Turn • Using your complex text, work with a partner/group to create a sample activity for each of the grade spans for your given standards (reading and writing). • Share your plans with all other “A” “B” or “C” groups.

  21. Can You Spot It? Watch the following video and note which literacy standards (reading and writing) are being incorporated into the science content lesson. https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-declaration-of-independence

  22. Informational Text subgenres expository text functional text literary nonfiction argument

  23. Content-Rich NonfictionIS . . . • informational text that gives factual information on a specifictopic or event. • designed primarily to explain, argue or describe rather than to entertain.

  24. Simplistic Diagram

  25. Textbook

  26. Peer Reviewed Research

  27. Use Manuals Unpacking the Meter ...........................2 XL Series Meters Specifications .............................. 3-4 Getting Started XL Series Meters Connectors.................................. 5-8 pH and Ion Specific................................................ 9-10 Using the XL Series Meter Touch Screen Operation...................................... 13-14 Screen Contrast Adjustment......................................14 Using The Stylus........................................................15 Stylus Calibration .......................................................15 Setting Time And Date...............................................16 On-Screen Keyboard .................................................17 Expansion Cards .......................................................18 Connecting To The Internet .......................................19 Button Functions .................................................. 20-23 Channel Assignment............................................ 24-25 Display Setup.............................................................26

  28. Articles

  29. Reference Books

  30. Magazines

  31. What Is Close Reading? Watch the following video and listen for key points of “close” reading and why “close” reading is a critical part of content literacy. http://www.mhecommoncoretoolbox.com/close-reading-and-the-ccss-part-1.html

  32. Let’s Try It • I Do--Think aloud– Using a model passage, think aloud and jot thoughts as you read a passage– this will model the thoughts for your students. **Remember to reread for additional thoughts and author references and meaning • Y’all Do---Try it with a partner • Things that will help students while learning to closely read– chunking the text, foldables, graphic organizers, sticky notes, talking to the text, partner readings, any comprehension strategies (reciprocal teaching, code the text, etc…)

  33. Write It/Communicate It • Look at writing sample of an 11th grader in physiology class. • Discuss key points

  34. Sum It Up! Good readers, communicators (writers and speakers), and scientists for that matter, are skilled in: 1. asking questions 2. making predictions 3. searching for information 4. testing hypothesis 5. summarizing and representing findings 6. monitoring understanding These skills need to be incorporated into science instruction. Students have difficulty reading and communicating about the science if they don't have science knowledge. Likewise, students have difficulty learning science if they don't have literacy skills.