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Anglo Saxon Period

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  1. Anglo Saxon Period

  2. Notes Quiz- write # and answer ONLY • Two groups of Celts invaded the British Isles—the Britons and the _________________. • The invasion of Britain in 55 B.C. was undertaken by the general named ______________________. • ___________________, a Roman cleric, arrived in England in 597 and converted King Ethelbert to Christianity. • The author of A History of the English Church and People was __________________________________. • The language used by the prose writers of Britain before Alfred the Great was _____________________________.

  3. Notes Review

  4. Languages Brought to England

  5. About the English Language The English language has changed, and these changes have taken place over hundreds of years. • Old English • Ca. 449-1100 • E.g. Beowulf • Middle English • Ca. 1100-1500 • E.g. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer • Modern English • Ca. 1500- • E.g. William Shakespeare

  6. BL Language Video • In the 3rd section of your NB, write today’s date and BL language video. List three things you learn about the language or that you found interesting based on video clip. http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/item126510.html

  7. Kennings: The Anglo Saxon Metaphor • A kenning is a special kind of metaphor used in Anglo Saxon poetry. • It is a compound word or phrase that describes an object or person in terms of something else, but which says something important about the essential nature of the entity.

  8. Types of Kennings 1. open compound (wakeful sleeper = ghost) 2. hyphenated compound (gold-friend = king) 3. Possessive (grave’s embrace = death) 4. prepositional phrase (Warden of men = God)

  9. Beowulf Kenning • The Anglo-Saxons used the kenning bright sweetness to describe mead. • With the mead-hall at the center of the Anglo- Saxons incredibly social community, mead was a crucial symbol of fellowship for these people. • The kenning bright sweetness that compares this honey- brewed beverage positively to color and flavor conveys the essential nature of mead for Anglo-Saxons.

  10. Example of Kenning Arrow aimer terror of dust Antique printer tickle-tool fowl’s fashion • These kennings all describe a feather—but each conveys a different aspect the entity. • Think about what each kenning emphasizes about the feather and in what different contexts these kennings might be effectively used. • Notice also that the last two kennings employ alliteration as well.

  11. More Examples of Kennings • Friend=Secret-keeper is a hyphenated compound kenning that describes a friend and highlights the essential quality of trustworthiness. What other kennings can you create to represent the noun friend? • Tree=Squirrel's playground is a possessive kenning that describes a tree and highlights its role as an environment for wildlife. Umbrella of nature is a prepositional kenning that also metaphorically defines a tree and emphasizes it shape and protectiveness. What other kennings can you create to describe a tree?

  12. Anglo-Saxon Values: • Fate • Fame through glorious deeds • Avenging the death of a kinsmen • Warrior society • Dignity • Bravery • Prowess in battle • Love of glory • Boasting/pride • Tribe loyalty

  13. Epic Poem • An epic poem is a long narrative poem that recounts in formal language the acts of a larger-than-life hero • Characteristics of an epic poem: • Earliest were recited • Uncertain authorship • Supernatural forces • Elevated style (lofty language) • A vast setting • Heroic or superhuman characters • Regular meter and rhythm (vs. rhyme scheme) • gods or godlike beings • action on a huge scale • stories begin in medias res (“in the middle of things

  14. Epic Hero • Characteristics of an Epic Hero: • Man of high status • His fate affects the destiny of his people • Embodies ideals and values of his people • Strong, skilled warrior; noble, quick-witted • Encounters supernatural events • Faces life-and-death struggles

  15. What is Jigsaw? A jigsaw activity is a group activity in which each member is dependent on the others for part of the information. In other words, group members must complete their assignments and cooperate with their group.

  16. Directions for Jigsaw • Independently read your assigned selection of the article and take notes in your notebook. • You will then meet with a group of peers who read the same section as you. In this group, you will read the selection again, discuss/compare your notes, and clarify any information within your group. Remember you are becoming an EXPERT of your section. • You will then meet with a group of peers who read the other sections of the article. You will be responsible for providing everyone in that group with the information from your section*. Make sure you take notes on the other sections while your peers are presenting.

  17. Important Note • *This is VERY important since you are responsible for relaying information to your group. REMEMBER, you are all reading different parts of the article and responsible for informing your group member about what you read since they will not have read it themselves.

  18. Beowulf Article Discussion

  19. “The Coming of Beowulf” Quiz! • How many men accompanied Beowulf on his voyage? • According to Beowulf, who/what will determine the outcome of the battle (two answers)?

  20. “The Coming of Beowulf” Quiz!! • Who did the men thank for their easy crossing of the sea? • What favor does Beowulf ask the king regarding his battle with Grendel?

  21. “The Coming of Beowulf” Quiz!!! • What is Hrothgar’s lieutenant’s opinion of Beowulf when he first arrives? • According to Beowulf, who/what will determine the outcome of the battle (two answers)?

  22. Beowulf DIRECTIONS: In pairs, answer the following on a loose-leaf sheet of paper. Provide quote, line number, and explanation(i.e., what does this quote tell us about the character, values, etc.) for each entry.

  23. Pair Work

  24. Pair Work • Make note of descriptive language and imagery

  25. Pair Work • Make note of descriptive language and imagery

  26. Pair Work

  27. “The Battle with Grendel” and “The Monster’s Lair” Quiz! • Where does Grendel die? • List the three parts of Grendel that are ripped off? • Who is Grendel’s father?

  28. “The Battle with Grendel” and “The Monster’s Lair” Quiz!! • What are the soldiers doing in the mead-hall when Grendel arrives? • Who do the Danes turn to for help against Grendel’s mother? • Who is Grendel’s father?

  29. “The Battle with Grendel” and “The Monster’s Lair” Quiz!!! • What do Beowulf’s men do to Grendel after Beowulf has gotten a hold of him? • What is the reward for the person who helps them against Grendel’s mother? • Who is Grendel’s father?

  30. Pair Work • Make note of descriptive language and imagery

  31. Pair Work • Make note of descriptive language and imagery

  32. “The Battle with Grendel’s Mother” & “The Last Battle” Quiz! • What is Grendel’s mother’s name? • What does Beowulf do to Grendel’s body after he has killed Grendel’s mother? • How is Wiglaf different from the other warriors?

  33. “The Battle with Grendel’s Mother” & “The Last Battle” Quiz!! • Describe how Beowulf kills Grendel’s mother. • What is Beowulf’s primary motivation for battling with Grendel’s mother? • What do the warriors do during the battle with the dragon?

  34. “The Battle with Grendel’s Mother” & “The Last Battle” Quiz!!! • Describe how Beowulf felt after he killed Grendel’s mother. • What fails Beowulf during his fight with Grendel’s mother? • Where are Beowulf’s men during the fight with Grendel’s mother? • What do the warriors do during the battle with the dragon?

  35. PAIR WORK “The Spoils” • If you were Wiglaf, how do you think you would have responded when Beowulf was wounded? • How would you have responded to Beowulf’s request? • What are Beowulf’s dying requests? • Why do you think he asks for this? • What does this request tell us? “The Farewell” • Do you agree that no other man is so deserving of praise as Beowulf (in this story)? Explain why or why not.