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Vaudeville comedians would often begin a story by stating, "A funny thing happened on the way to the theater" PowerPoint Presentation
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Vaudeville comedians would often begin a story by stating, "A funny thing happened on the way to the theater"

Vaudeville comedians would often begin a story by stating, "A funny thing happened on the way to the theater"

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Vaudeville comedians would often begin a story by stating, "A funny thing happened on the way to the theater"

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  1. Vaudeville comedians would often begin a story by stating, "A funny thing happened on the way to the theater".

  2. A Funny Thing Happened During the Process of Reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA)

  3. ESEA Flexibility: An overview September 26, 2011

  4. Introductionstates leading reform • States and districts have initiated groundbreaking reforms and innovations to increase the quality of instruction and improve academic achievement for all students. • NCLB requirements have unintentionally become barriers to State and local implementation of forward-looking reforms.

  5. Introductiondepartment offers flexibility • ESEA flexibility offers the opportunity to request flexibility on behalf of your State, your LEAs, and your schools in order to better focus on improving educational outcomes, closing achievement gaps, and increasing the quality of instruction. • This flexibility will build on and support the significant State and local reform efforts already underway.

  6. ESEA Flexibility “We’re going to let states, schools and teachers come up with innovative ways to give our children the skills they need to compete for the jobs of the future.” • President Obama September 23, 2011

  7. FLEXIBILITY TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND INCREASE THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION 1. 2013–2014 Timeline for Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) • Flexibility to develop new ambitious but achievable Annual Measurable Objectives in reading/language arts and mathematics 2. Implementation of School Improvement Requirements • Flexibility from requirement for LEAs to identify or take improvement actions for schools identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring 3. Implementation of LEA Improvement Requirements • Flexibility from requirement for SEAs to identify or take improvement actions for LEAs identified for improvement or corrective action

  8. FLEXIBILITY TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND INCREASE THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION 4. Rural LEAs • Flexibility to use Rural and Low-Income School Program funds or Small, Rural School Achievement Program for any authorized purpose regardless of AYP status 5. School-wide Programs • Flexibility to operate a school-wide program in a Title I school that does not meet the 40 percent poverty threshold if the SEA has identified the school as a priority school or a focus school, and the LEA is implementing interventions consistent with the turnaround principles or interventions that are based on the needs of the students in the school and designed to enhance the entire educational program in the school

  9. FLEXIBILITY TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND INCREASE THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION • Support School Improvement • Flexibility to allocate ESEA section 1003(a) funds to an LEA in order to serve any focus or priority school 7. Reward Schools • Flexibility to use funds reserved under ESEA section 1117(c)(2)(A) to provide financial rewards to any reward school 8. Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Improvement Plans • Flexibility from the requirements regarding HQT improvement plans

  10. FLEXIBILITY TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND INCREASE THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION • Transfer of Certain Funds • Flexibility to transfer up to 100 percent of the funds received under the authorized programs designated in ESEA section 6123 among those programs and into Title I, Part A 10. Use of School Improvement Grant (SIG) Funds to Support Priority Schools • Flexibility to award SIG funds available under ESEA section 1003(g) to an LEA to implement one of the four SIG models in any priority school

  11. Optional flexibilityan sea may wish to request an additional flexibility Use of Twenty-First Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) Program Funds • Flexibility of 21st CCLC program funds to support expanded learning time in addition to activities during non-school hours or periods when school is not in session

  12. PRINCIPLES FOR IMPROVING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND INCREASING THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION 1. College- and Career-Ready Expectations for All Students 2. State-Developed Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and Support 3. Supporting Effective Instruction and Leadership 4. Reducing Duplication and Unnecessary Burden

  13. Principle 1: College- and Career-Ready Expectations for All StudentsTo support States in continuing the work of transitioning students, teachers, and schools to higher standards • Adopt college- and career-ready (CCR) standards in at least reading/language arts and mathematics • Transition to and implement CCR standards • Develop and administer Statewide, aligned, high-quality assessments that measure student growth • Adopt ELP standards corresponding to the State’s new CCR standards and develop aligned assessments http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/index.shtml

  14. Principle 2: State-Developed Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and SupportTo support states’ efforts to move forward with next-generation accountability systems • Set ambitious but achievable AMOs • Reward schools: Provide incentives and recognition for high-progress and highest-performing Title I schools • Priority schools: Identify lowest-performing schools and implement interventions aligned with the turnaroundprinciples • Focus schools: Close achievement gaps by identifying and implementing interventions in schools with the greatest achievement gaps or low graduation rates • Provide incentives and supports for other Title I schools • Build SEA, LEA, and school capacity to improve student learning in all schools http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/school_improvement/title1/1003_g/index.shtml

  15. Principle 3: Supporting Effective Instruction and Leadership To support SEA and LEA development of evaluation systems that go beyond NCLB’s minimum HQT standards • Develop and adopt SEA guidelines for local teacher and principal evaluation and support systems • Ensure LEAs implement teacher and principal evaluation and support systems that are consistent with SEA guidelines http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/performance_evaluation/index.shtml

  16. Principle 4: Reducing Duplication and Unnecessary Burdento provide an environment in which schools and districts have the flexibility to focus on what is best for students • Remove duplicative and burdensome reporting requirements that have little or no impact on student outcomes • Evaluate and revise SEA administrative requirements to reduce duplication and unnecessary burden on LEAs and schools

  17. Implementation Timelines • The Secretary intends to grant waivers included in this flexibility through the end of the 2013–2014 school year. • An SEA may request an extension of the initial period of this flexibility prior to the start of the 2014–2015 school year unless it is superseded by reauthorization of the ESEA. • The time at which an SEA may begin to take advantage of a particular waiver and the deadlines for implementation of a particular principle vary from principle to principle and from waiver to waiver. See the “Timeline for Implementation” in the document titled ESEA Flexibility for the deadlines for complying with each principle and implementing each waiver.

  18. CONSULTATION • An SEA must engage diverse stakeholders and communities in the development of its request • Engage and solicit input from • teachers and their representatives • diverse stakeholders, such as students, parents, community-based organizations, civil rights organizations, organizations representing students with disabilities and English Learners, business organizations, and Indian tribes. • Consult with the State’s Committee of Practitioners http://www.doe.virginia.gov/index.shtml

  19. EVALUATION • An SEA that receives approval is encouraged to collaborate with the Department to evaluate at least one program, practice, or strategy the SEA or its LEAs implement under principle 1, 2, or 3. • The Department will work with the SEA to design and conduct the evaluation. The Department will fund the evaluation.

  20. timeline for submissionin order to provide flexibility to states by the end of the 2011-2012 school year, we will provide two submission windows • Submit request by November 14, 2011 for December peer review • Submit request by mid-February, 2012 for a Spring 2012 review

  21. Additional time • If an SEA needs additional time to plan for implementation of the flexibility package, it may request approval to use the same AMOs for AYP determinations in the 2011-2012 school year that it used in the 2010-2011 school year. • There will be an additional opportunity for these SEAs to submit a request for the full flexibility package following the 2011-2012 school year. • Details to follow.

  22. Peer Review process • SEA requests will be evaluated by expert peer reviewers • An SEA will have multiple opportunities to clarify its plans for reviewers and to answer any questions reviewers may have. • If necessary, the Department will provide feedback to an SEA about components of the SEA’s request that need additional development • Peer reviewer evaluations will inform the Secretary’s decisions to grant flexibility to SEAs.

  23. A Funny Thing Happened During the Process of Reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA)

  24. Educating America’s Children for 21st Century Jobs: The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act of 2011 To compete in the global economy, ensure America’s long-term prosperity, and protect our middle class, America needs to provide every child with a world-class education. The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act will set high expectations for all children to graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college and careers, support teachers and principals to help them provide high quality instruction, ensure disadvantaged students get their fair share of resources, focus federal attention on turning around low-performing schools and closingachievement gaps, and remove federal barriers to give states and communities the flexibility they need to innovate.

  25. The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act of 2011 will: • Fix the one-size-fits-all approach created by the No Child Left Behind Act. • Eliminate policies like the “adequate yearly progress” • requirements and mandated federal sanctions for all • schools that create pressure to “teach to the test.” • Support state-designed accountability systems consistent • with principles established by the national organization of • State superintendents. • Make schools accountable to the communities they serve • by ensuring that all parents, families, and community • members have access to disaggregated information about • how effectively their schools are educating all students.

  26. The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act of 2011 will: • Help ensure that every student graduates from high school ready for college and a career. • Support states as they develop and implement college and • career ready academic standards with high quality • assessments that will help make our young people the most • skilled citizens in the world. • Fix America’s dropout factories, the 12 percent of high • schools that produce 50 percent of our dropouts. • Help more children access high quality preschool and foster • collaboration between early childhood programs and school • systems to ensure that children start school ready to • succeed.

  27. The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act of 2011 will: • Support great teachers and principals, and ensure that all children receive the best instruction. • Help ensure there are great teachers and principals in every • school through improved support and evaluation systems. • Recruit and train teachers in high-need subjects like math • and science. • Help more schools provide a well-rounded education with • time for the arts and physical activity. • Support student success by promoting safe and healthy • schools. • Prepare more teachers to teach the diverse learners in • America’s schools including students with disabilities and • English learners.

  28. The Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act of 2011 will: • Focus the federal government’s role on the things it does best, while giving states and communities the • flexibility they need to address the unique needs of their students and schools. • Direct federal resources to turn around chronically struggling • schools and those with significant achievement gaps and • allow states to take student progress into consideration while • rating schools. • Break down barriers and promote alignment from early • learning to K-12 to higher education, and across federal • education programs. • Consolidate and streamline programs in the current law and • eliminate those that are duplicative or unnecessary.

  29. Senate Bill vs. Flexibility Waiver

  30. Senate Bill vs. Flexibility Waiver

  31. Senate Bill vs. Flexibility Waiver

  32. Next Steps for Virginia • December 2011 – The Virginia Board of Education will receive an • overview of the process. • January 2012 – The waiver request will be presented to the Board of • Education for approval. • February 2012 – The waiver request will be sent to the US Department • of Education.