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  1. Defining a Role for Sustainable Consumption Initiatives In New ZealandSarah J. McLarenLandcare Research

  2. Definition(s) The use of services and related products which respond to basic needs and bring a better quality of life while minimizing the use of natural resources and toxic materials as well as the emissions of waste and pollutants over the life-cycle so as not to jeopardize the needs of future generations. UN CSD, 2005

  3. History • Green consumerism 1980s • Agenda 21 at UNCED 1992 • Plan of Implementation: Article 15, WSSD 2002,10-Year Framework of Programmes on SCP • Marrakesh Process: Expert Meetings, Regional Meetings, Task Forces • Review of 10-Year Framework by CSD in 2010/2011 cycle of work

  4. Region and Country Initiatives • Europe: Strategy for Sustainable Development 2006 • “Sustainable Consumption and Production” one of seven key challenges • EU Sustainable Consumption and Production Action Plan in 2007 • UK: Sustainable Development Strategy 2005 • “Sustainable Consumption and Production” one of four priorities • SCP Evidence Base Research Programme, Advisory Group

  5. Theme 1Producing More Sustainable Products and Services • Development of new technologies and eco-innovation • Development of cleaner production processes and eco-efficient products/services • Promotion of technologies and eco-innovations • Voluntary initiatives by businesses (e.g. EMS, certification, reporting) • Setting standards and targets for products and processes • Dialogue, partnership and cooperative programmes between business, communities, government • Training and education • Use of economic incentives

  6. Theme 2 Changing Consumer Behaviour • Sustainable public procurement • Product labelling schemes • Advertising and marketing • Awareness-raising campaigns • Provision of information and education more generally • Banning certain products • Use of economic incentives

  7. New Zealand Initiatives • Sustainable Development Programme of Action (DPMC, 2003) • Product Stewardship (MfE): • Product Stewardship and Water Efficiency Labelling (2005) • Waste Minimisation (Solids) Bill (2006) • Ecolabelling: • Environmental Choice New Zealand

  8. Why Bother? • 10-Year Framework of Programmes • Ethical arguments • Economic reasons: • Product-oriented policy • “Clean and green” image

  9. Product-Oriented Policy • “It is becoming more and more evident that consumers are increasingly interested in the “world that lies behind” the product they buy” (Klaus Toepfer, Executive Director, UNEP) • Europe: WEEE, EoL Vehicles, EuP; IPP • Focus upstream and downstream – New Zealand exports (e.g. Food Miles)

  10. “Clean and Green” NZ • Tourism and exports • Tourism contributes 9.0% of GDP and 9.8% of total employment in NZ (2005, direct and indirect tourism activities) • Exports: international tourism 18.7%, dairy products 13.2%, of total exports • Minimising environmental impacts in New Zealand: exports, domestic consumption • From information provision to more sophisticated understanding of behaviour

  11. Conclusions • Product-oriented policy: • Identify export sectors most at risk • Work to improve environmental profile of their products • Demonstrate the environmental credentials of these products • “Clean and Green” New Zealand • Changing consumer behaviour and role of government (enabling policy framework) • Integrated programme on sustainable consumption