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Selecting a journal where to publish

Selecting a journal where to publish

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Selecting a journal where to publish

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  1. Selecting a journal where to publish Do it right and avoid the pitfalls Network Meeting Bishoftu 2019 Anders Wändahl aw@kth.se

  2. Slides, links and other materials: http://udsm.golonka.org/bishoftu2019/

  3. A teaser… wecandiscussmoreduring the week • Dissemination (a.k.a. publishing) • Enhanceyourvisibility • Collaboration • Research communication • Disambiguation (of yourself) • Givingcredit to your funders

  4. Dissemination • ”Publishing” in plainlanguage • Takehomemessage 1: youpublicationswilleventually be evaluated and scrutinized • Takehomemessage 2: onlypublishwithserious journals

  5. "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure." Goodhart’sLaw: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodhart%27s_law

  6. University rankings • Your institution/country is measured, ranked and benchmarkedpartly on the research output (publications) • Academic Ranking of World Universitites (Shanghai Ranking) • Leiden Ranking • Nature Index • QS World University Rankings • Scimago Journal & Country Rank • Times HigherEducation (THE)

  7. http://www.shanghairanking.com/ARWU-Methodology-2018.html

  8. https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/methodology-world-university-rankings-2018https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/methodology-world-university-rankings-2018

  9. Why publish at all? • Good for science • Appointments • Promotion • Tenure • Career • Funding • Postdoc • Fame and glory

  10. Why publish at all? • Appointments • Promotion • Tenure • Career • Funding • Postdoc • Fame and glory • Good for science

  11. What is the message from youruniversity?Is it in linewith the individualincentive?

  12. Lists, lists and lists… https://libguides.wits.ac.za/Scholarly_Research_Resources/Accredited_Journals

  13. What is a good journal? What determines the quality of a journal?

  14. Qualitative factors • Reputation • Editors, editorial boards • Peer-review • Databaseindexing • Appreciation from the (high-ranking) authors • Acceptance rate and turn-aroundtime [???]

  15. Indexing in databases The databasesarepickyaboutquality! A journal indexed in a major bibliographicdatabase is mostlikely a good candidate for your coming manuscript. • The qualityperspective • The outreachperspective

  16. Quantitative factors • Canquality be measured in numbers? • Citations • Impact factors • h-index

  17. Citations are collected by special citation databases

  18. The Journal Impact Factor

  19. Journal Impact Factor • 80/20 relationship (roughly 80% of the articles get 20% of the citations) • Different citation patterns in different research areas • Different citation patterns for different articletypes (original research, review, editorials, conference papers/abstracts etc.) • The impact factor of a journal doesn’t necessarily say anything on the article level

  20. Source normalized impact per paper (SNIP) corrects for differences in publication rated among disciplines. It weighs citations to a journal based on the number of citations in that field. So disciplines with smaller publication rates can be compared to ones with higher rates. It's defined as the ratio of a journals citation count per paper and the citation potential (average length of lists of reference lists in a field) for the journals subject field. Citation potential is shown to vary not only between journal subject categories – groupings of journals sharing a research field – or disciplines (e.g., journals in mathematics, engineering and social sciences tend to have lower values than titles in life sciences), but also between journals within the same subject category. For instance, basic journals tend to show higher citation potentials than applied or clinical journals, and journals covering emerging topics higher than periodicals in classical subjects or more general journals. SNIP corrects for such differences. (Source: http://www.lib.vt.edu/research/metrics/journal/snip.html)

  21. Avoidingpredatory publishers “In academic publishing, predatory open access publishing is an exploitative open-access publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not).” Wikipedia – 2017-03-06 Jeffrey Beall, author of Beall’s list

  22. Characteristics • No or poorconnectionwithAcademia • Highacceptance rate, fast turn-around • Minimal or non-existant peerreview • Aggressive mailing campaignes • Usually not indexed in major databases= (no Web of Science = no JIF, no Scopus = no ) • Open Access

  23. Deception!

  24. How to avoid them! • Haveyouheardaboutthis journal before? • Is the publisherclearlystated? • Canyoucontact the publisher? • Is the journal’scontentindexed in the major databases? • Canyourecognizeanyeditorialmembers*? • Is the cost (APC) clearlyindicated? • Is the publishermember of any publishing industryorganization or similar?

  25. Blacklist or Whitelist? vs.