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Virtual Reality and the Clash Consciousness

Virtual Reality and the Clash Consciousness

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Virtual Reality and the Clash Consciousness

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  1. Virtual Reality and the Clash Consciousness Jim Blascovich UCSB

  2. Andy Beall ReCVEB

  3. Jack Loomis 1995 ReCVEB

  4. ReCVEB

  5. ReCVEB

  6. Reaction • Surprisingly to me, while in this immersive virtual environment, I found reasoned suppression of my (intrusively accessible) fear response difficult if not impossible. • Perhaps this was a rivalry or “fame in the brain” competition between processes stemming from my being simultaneously in a physical world and a virtual world. ReCVEB

  7. Another Reaction • Imagine what I could do with this technology as a social psychologist. ReCVEB

  8. www.recveb.ucsb.edu ReCVEB

  9. VR Research Foci • Visual perception • Spatial cognition • Learning and training • Social interaction ReCVEB

  10. VR Research Foci • Visual perception • Spatial cognition • Learning and training • Social interaction Consciousness? ReCVEB

  11. Can VR help us experimentally study the interplay among behavioral processes that are: • Conscious • Unconscious • Metaconscious ? ReCVEB

  12. Overview • Virtual Environments: Nature, history, & technology. • Research Context: Challenge and Threat Motivation • Prototype Study ReCVEB

  13. Virtual Environments: Nature, History, and Technology ReCVEB

  14. What is a virtual environment? • refers to the generation and organization of sensory information that can lead to perceptions of a so-called synthetic (“artificial”) environment as non-synthetic (“natural”) ReCVEB

  15. The nature of virtual environments should not be confounded with any particular “technology” for generating and organizing the sensory information. • All such technologies interact with qualities of the person (e.g., the mind or “piñata”) to produce virtual experiences. ReCVEB

  16. Historically, humans have developed technologies to aid the mind in doing so for a long, long time. ReCVEB

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  25. The differences among these technologies are: • Perhaps more quantitative than qualitative. • Obviated in the power they have to immerse individuals within virtual environments (i.e., how fast immersion can happen). ReCVEB

  26. However, humans are neurobiologically capable of creating and inhabiting virtual environments, even quite immersive ones, without any extra-corporeal technology at all. ReCVEB

  27. Dreams ReCVEB

  28. Daydreams ReCVEB

  29. What are virtual environments? A state of mind. ReCVEB

  30. Where are virtual environments? An interesting proposition about virtual reality is that all perceived reality may really be virtual. ReCVEB

  31. Perhaps there is a sort of psychological environmental relativity. • “Grounded environments” form the base comparison for all others. ReCVEB

  32. Immersive Virtual Environment Technology: HMD-based ReCVEB

  33. ReCVEB

  34. As a bonus virtual environment tracking technology facilitates: • Behavioral measures • Spatial • Temporal • Spatial-termporal ReCVEB

  35. Proximity and fatality/hostility of gun shots. ReCVEB

  36. ReCVEB

  37. Research Context: Challenge and Threat Motivation ReCVEB

  38. Key Motivational States • Challenge--when resources roughly equal or outweigh demands • indexed by Dienstbier’s (1989) cardiovascular pattern of physiological toughness • Threat--when demands outweigh resources. • indexed by Dienstbier’s (1989) pattern of physiological weakness

  39. Cardiovascular Markers ReCVEB

  40. Implicit Evaluation Challenge Threat Situation Explicit Evaluation The Biopsychosocial Modelof Challenge and Threat (Blascovich et al., 1996; 2000; in press) ReCVEB

  41. Erving Goffman, 1963 • Individuals are threatened by members of stigmatized groups. ReCVEB

  42. Stigma-Threat Paradigm • Stigma Manipulations • Experimental • Quasi-Experimental • Real Interaction (Perceivers and Bearers) • Meet • Dyadic Performance Situation (cooperative task) • Outcome Measures • Subjective • Behavioral • Physiological

  43. No Stigma Stigma ReCVEB

  44. Cardiac Output (L/m) Pre-ejection Period (sec*-1) Total Peripheral Resistance (Resistance Units) Experiment 1- Word Finding Task Blascovich et al. (2001)

  45. Stigma ReCVEB

  46. Prototype Study ReCVEB

  47. What would happen if we experimentally crossed physical stigma with virtual stigma? ReCVEB

  48. Stigma-Threat Paradigm • Stigma Manipulations • Physical: Birthmark vs. No Birthmark • Real Interaction (Perceivers and Confederate Bearers) • Meet in an immersive virtual environment • Dyadic Performance Situation (cooperative task) Outcome Measures • Measures • Subjective • Behavioral • Physiological

  49. Physical + - + C I Virtual C - I ReCVEB