Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Shaun Fowler Operations Manager Darwin Regional Indigenous Advancement & CDEP Inc. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Shaun Fowler Operations Manager Darwin Regional Indigenous Advancement & CDEP Inc.

Shaun Fowler Operations Manager Darwin Regional Indigenous Advancement & CDEP Inc.

156 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Shaun Fowler Operations Manager Darwin Regional Indigenous Advancement & CDEP Inc.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Shaun Fowler Operations Manager Darwin Regional Indigenous Advancement & CDEP Inc. CDEP Training Requirements – Key Issues & Opportunities

  2. A Juggling Act – Meeting Program & Community Expectation • FAHCSIA Expectation • The intent of training is to build on the work readiness skills of participants to take up employment opportunities that may emerge • Work Readiness Stream – accredited or non-accredited training • ‘Training’ means an accredited training course which is a Certificate I Level course or higher • To be viable – outcome payments need to be met. Therefore emphasis on accredited training course at Certificate I Level or higher • Community Expectation • Developing skill sets directly related to the activity being undertaken • Disinterest in ‘training for training’s sake’ • Aversion to ‘classroom based’ training

  3. Shaun’s Two Cents Worth “... (FAHCSIA must) consider a payable outcome for delivery of non-accredited training that demonstrates developing and/or building upon the ‘soft skills’ of participants. Payable outcomes should also be considered for short vocational courses such as – Chainsaw Operations, Small Engine Maintenance and White Card (Construction). Experience shows rarely does accredited training link directly to an employment outcome in remote communities. Often the majority of training on offer is ‘on the job’ training. The training required to link participants to employment is demonstrable ‘soft skills’, such as work readiness, workplace communication and life skills (eg. health and hygiene) in addition to short vocational courses.”

  4. Accredited Training – Some of the Issues • Accessing RTO’s to travel to remote communities • Ensuring sufficient numbers exist to achieve viability • Quality of the RTO and/or the trainer ‘on the ground’ • Matching requirements of the course to the project • Engagement and retention in training programs • Funding .. Funding .. Funding

  5. Accredited Training – Potential Solutions • Forming regional strategies to meet training requirements across regions • Develop capacity of existing staff to deliver training – auspice through existing RTO’s. Potential revenue source to fund project materials. • Do not underestimate support required. Mentors and other support (transport, catering) is often imperative. • Utiliseorganisations such as Indigenous Community Volunteers. • ‘Wrap around’ funding • Remote Indigenous Gardens Network – share ‘best practice’

  6. New Training Package • AHC10 Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management Training Package • Industry Skills Councils • Agrifood Skills Australia • “The key body on skills, training and workforce development issues for the national agrifood industry: rural and related industries, food processing (including beverages, wine and pharmaceuticals), meat, seafood and racing.”

  7. Questions / Comments / Thoughts / Criticisms • Over to the floor