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Math Practices (Part I) November 2, 2012 Maricela Rincon, Professional Development Specialist PowerPoint Presentation
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Math Practices (Part I) November 2, 2012 Maricela Rincon, Professional Development Specialist

Math Practices (Part I) November 2, 2012 Maricela Rincon, Professional Development Specialist

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Math Practices (Part I) November 2, 2012 Maricela Rincon, Professional Development Specialist

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  1. Math Practices (Part I) November 2, 2012 Maricela Rincon, Professional Development Specialist mrincon@lcps.k12.nm.us

  2. M A T H P R A C T I C E S P A R T O N E

  3. Our Objectives Content: • We will collaborate to formulate Specific ways that Mathematical Practices can be embedded into math lessons. • We will identify mathematical practices in lesson delivery. Language : • We will articulate and provide examples of mathematical practices

  4. 1. Make sense of complex problems and ……persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the …….reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Standards for Mathematical Practice (CCSS, 2010)

  5. Mathematics Practice Standards • What do we already know? • Start your Clicker • Ready – Set- Go!

  6. Teaching Mathematics What does this look like? • Mathematical Practices require students to be able to think and reason abstractly and deeply . In order to apply techniques they have learned to solve complex problems.

  7. Four Major Claims for the Smarter Balanced Assessment • Claim #1 - Explain and apply mathematical concepts, carry out procedures with precision and fluency. • Claim #2 - Frame and solve a range of complex problems in pure and applied mathematics. • Claim #3 - Clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others. • Claim #4 - Analyze complex, real-world scenarios and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.

  8. Cognitive Demand • Take a minute to brainstorm words that come to mind when you think about Cognitive Demand. • Use a separate Post-it note to write each word that comes to mind. • Post your notes on the Cognitive Demand poster.

  9. Focus math task

  10. Define or Describe the term as it applies to your context: Struggle

  11. How do teachers currently identify students who are struggling in math?

  12. Destructive Struggle • Leads to frustration • Makes learning goals feel hazy and out of reach • Feels Fruitless • Leaves students feeling abandoned and 0n their own • Creates a sense of inadequacy

  13. Productive Struggle • Leads to understanding • Makes learning goals feel attainable and efforts seem worthwhile • Yield results • Leads students to feelings of empowerment and efficacy • Creates a sense of hope

  14. Why Focus on Academic Language? • In teaching content – our priority is content: • Page 6 in our Red CCSS Reference Guide: A strong, comprehensive school-wide literacy program requires wide-ranging, rigorous academic preparation [in math] particularly in the early grades. Each grade will include students who are still acquiring English. For those students, it is possible to meet the standards [in math] without displaying native-like control or conventions and vocabulary. Should this change our expectations of ELLs?

  15. Teaching with CCSS • lmhenry9 says: • April 5, 2012 at 8:32 pm • …I think many teachers teach math in a fairly “traditional” way – instructing students on how to do (whatever) and then assign problems to be completed. How is our “mode of business,” if you will, going to change? • Thanks – Lisa

  16. Bill McCallumsays: • April 13, 2012 at 10:19 am • Dear Lisa, I don’t see the standards as dictating any particular teaching method, but rather setting goals for student understanding. Different people have different ideas about what is the best method for achieving that understanding. That said, I think it’s pretty clear that classrooms implementing the standards should have some way of fostering understanding and reasoning, and classrooms where students are just sitting and listening are unlikely to achieve that.

  17. Part II Part I of the Presentation provided us with background information and a foundation along with the rationale for the purpose of the Math Practices. Part II of the Math Practices will engage us in the application of the Mathematical Practices.

  18. THANK YOU!