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Choose Appropriate Language

Choose Appropriate Language

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Choose Appropriate Language

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  1. Good Afternoon!Please grab a grammar book, turn to page 128, take out your notes, and be ready to follow along when the music stops.

  2. Choose Appropriate Language • 17a) Stay away from jargon. • Except when it is the best way to make your particular point to an appropriate audience. • 17b) Avoid pretentious language, most euphemisms, and “doublespeak.” • 17c) Avoid obsolete and invented words. • 17d) In most contexts, avoid slang, regional expressions, and nonstandard English • 17e) Choose and appropriate level of formality. • 17f) Avoid sexist language • 17g) Revise language that may offend groups of people.

  3. For today: • Grammar • Thesis/Evidence Review • Introductions • Body paragraphs • Citations • Format

  4. Thesis/Evidence • Each of you will pass your Thesis/Evidence homework to two of your classmates who will comment (positively but constructively) on the content of your ideas/evidence. This means you will comment on two of your classmates’ ideas/evidence as well. • Take 4 minutes for each review.

  5. Introduction Paragraphs – The Hook • First we need a hook! Your annotated handouts have some examples, but also consider: • Quotes from the text with some explanation • A personal anecdote, short story • Interesting facts, numbers, or statistics • A broad and general “funnel” statement about your topic • Background information about the text/topic

  6. Introduction Paragraphs – Background Information • Assume your reader is familiar with the text, but not an expert. You are the expert! • In a few sentences, give background about the text, plot, characters, themes, or symbols. • Remember to mention the author and title of the work to be discussed.

  7. Introduction Paragraphs – The Thesis Statement • A tie-in or transition sentence may be needed between your background and thesis statement. • Present your thesis statement as closely as you can to how you phrased it for homework.

  8. Things to Avoid • Cliches: Dead expressions will lose the audience. • The Definition of a Well Known Word: Avoid defining words that most people already know • The Announcement Introduction: Avoid announcing what your paper will be about. After reading it, I’ll know. • The “In Common Question” Introduction: What do Jennifer Lopez, Will Ferrell, and my mailman have in common? Don’t be tempted when you do a character analysis!

  9. Body Paragraphs – BASIC Structure • Topic Sentence • The Quote Sandwich: • Background/explanation • Evidence • Inference/interpretation • Transition

  10. Body Paragraphs – The Topic Sentence • The topic sentence contains the central idea around which a paragraph is developed. A good one has the following six characteristics: • It introduces the topic of a paragraph without announcing it. • It hooks the reader. • It plants questions in the readers' mind. • It usesthought-provoking words. • It is usually the first sentence; however, it can occur anywhere in the paragraph or it can be implied. • It provides a transition from the previous paragraph.

  11. Body Paragraphs – Practice with Topic Sentences • Romeo is a good guy. • The Nurse is like Friar Laurence. • Tybalt’s violent tendencies show human free will. • Rivalries are bad.

  12. Body Paragraphs – The Quote Sandwich • The Quote Sandwich is a way to think about how evidence should be presented in an essay. • Top slice: A transition from topic sentence to evidence. Some context or explanation. Perhaps the speaker or author. • The middle: The quote itself (yummy). Make sure it is structurally and grammatically sound. • Bottom slice: Explain how this quote supports your topic sentence or thesis statement.

  13. Body Paragraphs – Transitions • Ease us from the topic of the current paragraph to a discussion of what might come next.

  14. Body Paragraphs – Citations • Handout

  15. MLA Formatting • Handout

  16. For next time: • A rough draft of your literary analysis essay. • 5-7 paragraphs (including intro/conclusion) • 3-5 body paragraphs • Typed in MLA format • Remember your resources: • Annotated handout “How to Write a Literary Analysis Paper” • MLA Format handout • Quoting Shakespeare • Thesis/Evidence • Notes

  17. Basic Structure • Intro: • Hook • Background • (transition) • Thesis Statement • Body Paragraphs • Topic sentence (transition) • Sandwich • Background • Evidence/quote • Inference/explanation • Transition • Conclusion • Sum up evidence • New thoughts? • Reaffirm thesis statement

  18. whauser84@gmail.com