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October 31 st – November 2, 2013 Long Beach, California PowerPoint Presentation
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October 31 st – November 2, 2013 Long Beach, California

October 31 st – November 2, 2013 Long Beach, California

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October 31 st – November 2, 2013 Long Beach, California

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  1. October 31st – November 2, 2013 Long Beach, California

  2. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31ST6:00 – 6:10 PM - Welcome Remarks MR. JEFF KELLOGG Board President, Long Beach City College

  3. 6:10 – 8:00 PM Dinner and Overview of the Governance Institute for Student Success NARCISA A. POLONIO, Ed. D. Executive Vice President for Education, Research and Board Leadership Services Association of Community College Trustees BYRON MCCLENNEY, Ed.D. Director, Student Success Initiatives The University of Texas at Austin

  4. Student Success in Community Colleges: Why now? “The American Dream is at risk. Community colleges can help reclaim it. But stepping up to the challenge will require dramatic redesign of these institutions, their missions, and most critically, student’s educational experiences.” (Reclaiming the American Dream. A report from the 21st- Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges)

  5. Student Success in Community Colleges: Why now? • National Landscape • US global ranking - 16th in the worldin college degree completion among 25 to 34-year-olds • Changing workforce needs • Calls for affordability, access, success and completion • Decrease in federal support

  6. Student Success in Community Colleges: Why Now? • Student Landscape • Community college students face more barriers than their 4-year college and university counterparts • College readiness • Financial • Academic guidance • Only 46% of students who enter community college with the goal of earning a degree or certificate actually achieve the goal • http://www.cccse.org * * Center for Community College Student Engagement

  7. Serenity Wisdom “Serenity to accept the things I cannot change; Courage to change the things I can, and; the Wisdom to the know the difference”

  8. The Courage to Change What Should Be Changed • There are problems people can tackle together that they could not solve alone. • How culture can condition us is an important part of developing wisdom. • It is easier to stop things from happening than making it happen. • … • …

  9. State Landscape • Priorities and Barriers • Policy Considerations • Statewide Agenda to Advance Student Success

  10. Student Success in Community Colleges: Why here? • State Landscape • Meet education and workforce needs • Limited resources • Demands for accountability • CA Student Success Scorecard • Voluntary Framework of Accountability (http://vfa.aacc.nche.edu/Pages/default.aspx) • Policy and Legislative Considerations: • performance-based funding • conferring bachelor’s degrees • pilot two-tier tuition law • recommendations for new HE agenda • SB 1456 - Student Success Act of 2012 CA

  11. Student Success in Community Colleges: Why here? • State Landscape • Statewide Agenda to Advance Student Success: • Increase college and career readiness • Strengthen support for entering students • Incentivize successful student behaviors • Align course offerings to meet student needs • Improve the education of basic skills students • Revitalize and re-envision professional development • Enable efficient statewide leadership and increase coordination among colleges • Align resources with student success recommendations CA

  12. Why is trustees involvement important to student success? • Board of trustees represent the community • Trustee’s primary interest to serve the community and students • Represent the public interest and public trust of the community • Stewards of the mission • Fiduciary responsibility: financial and academic quality • Policy Making

  13. Working Effectively as a Governance Team: Key Indicators

  14. Governance Institute for Student Success (GISS) • Blends expertise of two outstanding programs • Fosters student success and completion through effective governance by: • Convening trustees and presidents • Assessing board readiness and reviewing data • Enhancing awareness of student success and data-driven decision making • Promoting an agenda for measuring, improving and committing to student success • Improving relationships and governance • Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  15. GISS - Model

  16. GISS - Overview • Engaged more than 450 trustees representing over 75 governing boards. • Institutes in Ohio, Texas, Washington and Nebraska • Motivated participants to move from a vision of access to a vision of success for their colleges. • Participants took what they learned at the institute back to the full board to continue the reflection and analysis of their Board Self-Assessment report and student success data. • Coached boards in developing action and implementation plans for strengthening the board and promoting student success through effective governance.

  17. GISS Experience – In their own words… (GISS-NE) https://vimeo.com/acct/review/75623676/60836b12b3

  18. GISS – Lessons Learned • Changed the college culture • Enhanced collaboration among board and president • Assisted boards in identifying and overcoming challenges • Reinforced and complemented existing initiatives

  19. Until tomorrow at 8:30 am…. Have a great evening!

  20. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST8:30 – 9:30 AM Trustees and Student Success NARCISA A. POLONIO

  21. Trustees and Student Success • Demographic Context • Value Trustees Bring • Key Characteristics of Effective Boards • Board Self-Assessment

  22. Demographic Context:National Community College Governance 2012 Public Community College Governing Boards: Structure and Composition (ACCT)

  23. Demographic Context:California Governing Board Composition California Community Colleges Board of Governors sets policy and provides guidance for the 72 districts and 112 colleges which constitute the system.

  24. Gender – GISS (All)

  25. Gender – Southern CA

  26. Age – GISS (All)

  27. Age – Southern CA

  28. Race/Ethnicity – GISS (All)

  29. Board Service Years– GISS (All)

  30. Board Service Years – Southern CA Mean=7.8

  31. Board Hours Per Month – GISS (All)

  32. Board Hours Per Month – Southern CA Mean=33.8

  33. Primary Areas of Expertise – Southern CA

  34. Value Trustees Bring • Act as a unit • Represent the common ground • Set the policy direction • Employ, evaluate and support the president • Define policy standard for college operations • Create a positive climate • Monitor performance • Support and be advocates for the college • Lead as thoughtful, educated team

  35. Exercise: How does your team add value?

  36. Essential Characteristics of Effective Boards What characteristics do you believe are essential for a board to function effectively?

  37. Essential characteristics of Effective Boards POLICIES AND PROCESS CODE OF ETHICS BY-LAWS NO SURPRISE RULE SHARING INFORMATION COMMUNICATION Great Boards STATE AND NATIONAL TRAINING GOVERNANCE FIDUCIARY COORDINATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES ACCOUNTABILITY AND SELF-EXAMINATION BOARD SELF-ASSESSMENT STUDENT SUCCESS DATA

  38. Board/President Relationship • 6 Essentials of Good Relationships • Understanding Roles and Responsibilities • Matching CEO/President and Board Expectations

  39. Board Self-Assessment (BSA) • 8 key indicators: • Effective Leadership • The Right Chemistry • Leading by Example • Big Picture Focus: Institutional Climate • Student Success Indicators of Institutional Effectiveness • Institutional Readiness for Student Success • Trustee Preparation • Trustee Satisfaction

  40. Board Self-Assessment • Key points to consider: • Points of consensus • Points of divergence • Areas for further discussion • Areas for attention by the full board • Red Flags

  41. Board Self-Assessment Key Benefits: • Continuous improvement • Strengthen communication • Set an example for the institution • Value opinions • Strengthen board-president (chancellor) expectations and relationships • Accountability • Transparency • Common sense!

  42. Board Self-Assessment

  43. Overall BSA Averages for Institutional Climate, Student Success, and Trustee Experience

  44. Individual BSA Review:Example of Average Responses by Category

  45. Individual BSA Review:Example of Average Responses by Trustee

  46. Compilation of Individual Trustees’ Responses: Example of Responses by Rating Scale

  47. Individual BSA Review – Effective Leadership: Board’s Roles and Responsibilities

  48. Individual Trustees’ Responses - Example of Effective Leadership: Board’s Roles and Responsibilities

  49. Example of Effective Leadership:Board’s Roles and Responsibilities