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Community Intervention for Census Tract 1051 Terika Mackey PowerPoint Presentation
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Community Intervention for Census Tract 1051 Terika Mackey

Community Intervention for Census Tract 1051 Terika Mackey

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Community Intervention for Census Tract 1051 Terika Mackey

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  1. Community Intervention for Census Tract 1051Terika Mackey

  2. Census Tract 1051 vs. Oklahoma City Differences Age Race Distribution Social Security 65 years and over/Poverty 65 years and over median income 65 years and over/ Education Below Poverty Level according to Sex Similarities • Median Household Income • Married Couples Median Income • Employment • Not in the Labor Force

  3. Assets for Census Tract 1051 • Chesapeake • Economic Contribution • Resources and Businesses • DHS • Oklahoma Health Care Authority • Election Board • Medical and Dental Clinics • Red Rock • Infant Crisis • Youth Services of Oklahoma County • Schools • Dove Science Academy • Bishop McGuinness • Langston OKC • Metro Tech Springlake Campus (close proximity)

  4. Social Problem • Individuals 65 years of age and older in poverty Zhan, M., & Pandey, S. (2002). Postsecondary education and the well-being of women in retirement. Social Work Research, 26(3), 171- 184

  5. Evidence Based Practicesfor Future Generations • Success For All • Comprehensive school wide reform program that is primarily for High-Poverty Elementary Schools. Emphasis on Early Detection and prevention of reading problems before they become serious. • Daily 90 minute reading classes • Reading curriculum that focuses on language development. • Daily 1 on 1 tutoring • Cooperative learning activities • Pretest for Kindergarten students at the beginning of the study. Then in 2nd grade the study assessed the reading outcomes for those participants. • Scored higher in passage comprehension than 58% of their counterparts • Scored higher in word identification skills than 60% of their counterparts • Scored higher in word attack skills than 64% of their counterparts • Overall, on average 2nd graders at Success for all schools scored 25-30% of a grade level higher in reading ability than their counterparts. • Benefits for Society • Reading and educational attainment correlate with poverty level http://www.successforall.org/

  6. Evidence Based Practicesfor Future Generations continued… • Small Schools of Choice (SSC) • Small public high schools were created in high poverty areas in New York City. They were designed in communities to replace larger low performing high schools. These small schools compete for students through the city’s system of school choice. • Approx. 100-120 students per grade, allows the student to receive more individualized attention from their teachers. • New principals and teachers selected • Start up funding from the Department of Education • Schools received assistance with leadership development, staff hiring, and partnerships with local business and non profits. • There was a 6% increase in the four year high school graduation rate. • There was a 4% increase in the rate of graduation with the New York State Regents diploma • There was also a 4% increase on students who scored high enough on the Regents exam in English to be considered college ready. • Benefits to Society • Increase high school graduation rate, and those who are ready for college. https://www2.ed.gov/programs/sif/sigevidencebased/smallschlofchoicenarrative.pdf

  7. Evidence Based Practicesfor Future Generations continued… • Career Academies • Organized within large high schools in low income urban areas. • Small learning communities with 150 to 200 students to create more supportive and personalized learning environment. • Combine academic and career and technical curricula around a career theme • Partnership with local employers to provide career awareness and work based learning opportunities for students. • The students are recruited and students enter a Career Academy in 9th or 10th grade and they are taught by a single team of teachers through 12th grade. • 9 Career Academies in high schools were evaluated across the US. • 11-12 year follow up suggests the following: • A 11% increase in average annual earnings For example: those who attended Career Academies earned $24,560 versus $22,100 for those who did not attend. • Men had a 17% increase in annual earnings over the follow up period. • Benefits to Society • The total earnings gain was $19,700 per student over the eight years following his or her graduation. http://evidencebasedprograms.org/1366-2/career-academies

  8. Application • Utilize community assets • Partnership with schools inside and outside Census Tract • Attend School Board Meeting and discuss some of the models such as Small School of Choice • Go outside of Census Tract to partner with programs and services for Older Adults through Careers Academies • Organize a community meeting to determine who the connectors, salesmen, and mavens are • Have members make a pledge to look out for older adults in the community in different areas of need (i.e. medication, stop by, meals, transportation)

  9. References Career Academies – Top Tier. (2014, September). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from http://evidencebasedprograms.org/1366-2/career-academies Chesapeake Energy Corporation. (n.d.). Retrieved October 20, 2017, from http://www.chk.com/ Evidence Summary for New York City’s Small Schools of Choice. (n.d.).Retrieved November 21, 2017, from http://evidencebasedprograms.org/new- york-citys-small-schools-of-choice-near-top-tier Success for All for grades K-2 – Top Tier. (2008, December). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from http://evidencebasedprograms.org/1366-2/success-for-all United States Census Bureau, (2016) Retrieved September 24, 2017 from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refesh=t #none Zhan, M., & Pandey, S. (2002). Postsecondary education and the well-being of women in retirement. Social Work Research, 26(3), 171-184