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sitHCCC003a RECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES

sitHCCC003a RECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES

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sitHCCC003a RECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES

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  1. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Receiving stock Why is receiving and storing important?

  2. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Correctly purchased produce directly influences food production efficiency. • When raw ingredients are purchased correctly they will meet the required standards for quantity, portion size, and quality and product specifications. • As most hospitality operations purchase food only two to three times per week, they may not use that product for one, two, three days or maybe longer. It is very important that they purchase the best quality ingredients to ensure that when they are used, in two or three day’s time, they have not deteriorated too much and are of a suitable quality to be used. • If poor quality products are purchased by the time the chef gets around to using them they may have ‘gone off’ and have to be thrown away, which costs money.

  3. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Correct purchasing procedures must also be supported by correct receiving and storing of procedures to ensure that goods are checked accurately and are judged to be of a suitable standard to be accepted by the business. • These procedures and their complexity may vary depending on the type and size of an establishment and its turnover. In a small establishment, the owner or chef will usually be responsible for buying, receiving and storing stock. • In larger establishments, such as four and five star hotels, staff are specifically employed to look after each department such as purchasing, stores, issuing, bookkeeping etc.

  4. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES What is receiving? The term ‘receiving’ in the culinary industry simply means to receive food orders placed with suppliers, and to ensure they are accurate. In Victoria each food business must operate a Food Safety Program. Part of this program is to ensure that all food that is received is safe and suitable for human consumption. The Food Safety Program can also be used to ensure food is of a suitable Quality, consistency, weight / quantity and meets purchase specifications and at the correct temperature. When food is received their must be a standard operating procedure followed to check all goods that have been delivered are the ones who have been ordered.

  5. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Activity 1: As a cook in a restaurant or café what type of food items and non food items do you receive and store. Name 5 food items Name 5 non food items

  6. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Standard Operating Procedure for receiving goods If your business operates a HACCP based Food Safety Program then you will also need to complete the ‘Goods Receiving’ documentation following your company’s Standard Operating Procedures for receiving goods. Should your business not have a standard procedure an example of what procedures to follow are given below. Standard Operating Procedure – Receiving goods Our business recognises that checking incoming goods is important to verify the integrity of our ingredients and have implemented a policy to monitor the Receival process.

  7. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES We ensure that each delivery is only received when someone is present to assess the Quality, Quantity, Weight, Product Specifications, Packaging and suitable Temperature of incoming stock • All perishable foods must be delivered at the following temperatures: • Chilled foods at or below 5 degrees Celsius • Hot foods at or above 60 degrees Celsius • Frozen foods are frozen solid and show no signs of defrosting or being refrozen. • 2. Packaging must be intact, clearly labelled with ingredients listing and nutritional panel, and be within the Use By or Best Before date and protect the food from the likelihood of contamination. • 3. Quality of the product must be assessed for damage, infestation or spoilage. • 4. TheQuantityor Weight of the product must be assessed to ensure the correct amount has been delivered. • 5. Product Specifications must be assessed to ensure what has been ordered matches what has been delivered or a suitable substitute has been supplied.

  8. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • The food transport vehicle must be clean, sanitary and transport perishable foods at appropriate temperatures (frozen foods frozen and perishable foods less than 5 Deg Celsius) and are suitable for the transport of foodstuffs. • The organisation of product within food transport vehicles ensures that there is no risk of Chemical, Physical or Microbiological contamination. • Delivery drivers adhere to good personal hygiene standards and follow safe food handling practice

  9. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Receiving and checking goods On delivery of any product, the person responsible for receiving must ensure the delivery docket is the same as the purchase order. The following factors are used to verify the order: • Quantity corresponds with amount, or number ordered • Unit size corresponds with goods ordered • Weight delivered corresponds to the correct weight ordered • Quality of goods and packaging meet enterprise standards for freshness and hygiene • Correct temperatures are maintained during delivery. E.g. High Risk foods are delivered between one and five degrees Celsius. Frozen food is delivered frozen.

  10. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Checking correct quantity When receiving goods it is important quantities are checked to ensure the amount that has been ordered is actually the amount that has been delivered. To do this staff must follow their company Standard Operating Procedures according to enterprise standards. These may include: • Count and weigh all products • Check the number or weight of items delivered against the quantity ordered on the invoice or purchase order • Know the weight of boxes or containers that the food is delivered in • Familiarize yourself with quantities in which foods are package

  11. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Checking size and weight • Size and weight of goods delivered should correspond to the size and weight of goods ordered. Packaging size may be incorrect, e.g. 600 ml cream containers sent instead of 300 ml. or incorrect brand or product delivered. Staff must: • Check size specifications. • Packaging size may be incorrect, e.g. 600ml cream containers sent instead of 300ml • Check correct brand has been delivered • All goods must be weighed on delivery • If size has been specified for a particular fresh product, ensure that each is the same size or weight or very similar.

  12. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Checking quality The quality of all goods delivered must reach enterprise standards as set out in company Standard Operating Procedures. These may include: • Check that frozen products are frozen. • Check use-by dates. • Check the temperature of chilled products. • Check packaging for damage, rips and/or tears. • Check for signs of vermin. • Check tins for bulging. This is a sign that contents are contaminated and must be returned or quarantined. • Check that vacuum-packed meats are still sealed. Any meats whose packaging is compromised should be returned or quarantined following company Standard Operating Procedures.

  13. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Checking for freshness Each product has particular quality points that a good stores person or chef will look for concerning freshness. These are: Fish – Eyes: clear not, sunken Flesh: Firm, translucent Skin: shiny and reflective Gills: bright red Smell: fresh sea aroma Scales: firm and clinging to body Meat: Beef – Colour: cherry red Fat: firm and creamy Flesh: firm to the touch Meat: Lamb – Flesh: rose pink Fat: white waxy appearance

  14. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • Meat: Veal- Flesh: light pink and soft Fat: minimal Meat: Pork – Flesh: light pink Fat: white and soft Fruit and Vegetables – Firm Bright colour Free of bruises Free of insect damage Free from blemishes and cuts

  15. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Using a thermometer Thermometers have now become and essential tool in every kitchen. Measuring and recording of temperatures goes to the very basic principles of a HACCP food safety program. Knowing how to correctly use a thermometer and correctly recording the temperature in the food safety program will require staff to be trained in these tasks.

  16. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • There are basically three types of thermometers • 1. In built thermometers such as used in coolrooms and refrigeration • 2. Probe thermometers – which can be used to check temperatures by inserting a probe • 3. Infra red thermometers – which measure surface temperatures by shining an infra red beam

  17. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • You may find the following tips useful, when using your thermometer: • make sure that the thermometer is clean and dry; • place the probe into the food and wait until the temperature reading has stabilised before reading the temperature; • measure different parts of a food as the temperature may not be the same, for example, if food is being cooled in a refrigerator the top of the food may be cooler than the middle of the food; • clean and sanitise the thermometer after measuring the temperature of one food and before measuring the temperature of another food; • if using the thermometer to measure hot and cold food, wait for the thermometer to return to room temperature between measurements; • measure the temperature of different foods in a refrigerator or display unit as there will be colder and hotter spots within the refrigerator or unit; • measure the temperature of packaged chilled food by placing the length of the thermometer between two packages -    the temperature will be approximate but the package remains intact.

  18. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • The probe of a thermometer can be cleaned and sanitised by using the following steps: • washing the probe with warm water and detergent; • sanitising the probe in an appropriate way for your thermometer (alcoholic swabs are often used); • rinsing the sanitiser away if necessary (refer to the instructions on the sanitiser); allowing the probe to air dry or thoroughly drying it with a disposable towel.

  19. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Ice Slurry Calibration Method Prepare a mixture of 50% crushed ice and 50% cold water in a suitable container. Let the temperature stabilise at 0°C by standing for 5 minutes. Place the probe thermometer in the ice slurry and let the thermometer stabilise for 2 minutes. The thermometer should read 0°C ± 1 °C.

  20. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Boiling Water Calibration Method In a suitable pot boil water, place the probe thermometer in the boiling water and allow to stabilise for 2 minutes. The temperature should read 100°C ± 1 °C.Record the results in the diary section of the food safety program

  21. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Calibrating inbuilt thermometers First calibrate a probe thermometer using the ice slurry and boiling methods. Once you are satisfied that the probe thermometer is at least ± 1°C then compare that to a container of water that has been in the coolroom or fridge for at least 12 hours

  22. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Calibrating Infra red thermometers You will need to follow the manufacturer’s instructions to calibrate an infra red thermometer Corrective Action If the thermometer is more than ± 1 °C then it will need to be re calibrated, replaced or batteries replaced.

  23. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Activity 2: Complete the following goods receival form for 5 different delivery items. You will need to make up the information or use information from your workplace.

  24. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES What is storing? Storing perishable foods Storing refers to how and where purchases are put away until required for use by the kitchen. The correct storage of foodstuffs is important to ensure perishable foods have as long a shelf life as possible and do not spoil before they can be used. If perishable foods are not stored correctly they will spoil very quickly which means they have to be thrown out, which costs the business money. Similarly if prepared foods are not stored properly they too will spoil quickly. This means the business has not only lost money for the costs of the raw ingredients but has also lost money through labour cost for the time taken to prepare the product in the first place. Below is a table outlining the correct storage conditions for a variety of raw and pre prepared foods commonly found in catering establishments.

  25. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES

  26. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Sanitation • High standards are essential for any food storage. • Clean shelving. • Surfaces, e.g. walls, ceilings, floors, to be free from cracks, paint flakes, etc. • Stainless steel shelving in cool room. • Seals around doors to be kept clean and free from grime build up. • Active steps, e.g. traps, to deter insects and vermin. • Regular cleaning program. Temperature • Correct temperature for different food groups. • Correct humidity levels. • Dry store: 12º – 15ºC. • Cool room – meat: 1º – 3ºC. • Cool room – dairy and fruit and vegetables: 4º – 5ºC. • Freezer: Minus 18ºC. • Temperatures to be monitored. Ventilation • Free from dampness • Moderate humidity levels • Good air circulation

  27. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES HACCP documentation If your business operates a HACCP based Food Safety Program then you will also need to complete the Fridge /Freezer temperature monitoring documentation following your company’s Standard Operating Procedures for storing foodstuffs. Should your business not have a standard procedure for storing perishable goods an example of what procedures to follow are given below Refrigerated Storage Our business recognises the importance of correctly storing perishable food correctly to minimize the risks of food contamination, or the growth of Food Poisoning or Food Spoilage Bacteria to unacceptable levels, which may compromise food safety or food quality.

  28. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Our restaurant has adopted the following refrigerated storage procedures. • Perishable foods are stored at a temperature of 5 Degrees Celsius or below. • Refrigerated Units operate between 1 Degree Celsius to 5 Degrees Celsius. • Fridge temperatures are recorded twice daily. If the temperature of the fridge is over 5 Degrees Celsius the frequency of checking is increased to every 30 minutes to ensure that the temperature returns to below 5 Degrees Celsius within 2 hours. • Foods found to be stored above 5 Degrees Celsius for more than 4 hours are thrown away and recorded on a Food Wastage Report. Foods found to be above 5 Degrees Celsius for between 2 and 4 hours are cooked or used immediately. • Hot food is cooled prior to refrigeration.

  29. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • 6. Opening and closing of fridge doors are kept to a minimum and fridge doors are never left open. • Fridge seals are kept in good condition, clean, are not perished or show signs of damage. • Refrigerators are not overstocked with product. • Product is not placed in front of motor fans or fridge probe (Internal Fridge Thermometer). • Cooked foods and ready to eat foods are stored above raw foods. • All opened food is stored on clean and sanitised surfaces and protected from the likelihood of contamination by covering with glad wrap or foil or decanted into food grade containers with fitted lids. Decanted items are clearly identified with Product Name, Use-By or Best Before Date and Batch No. • Foods stored on shelving are placed at least 30cm off the floor. • Opened perishable foods are clearly labelled and dated with the date of opening. • Foods are rotated on a First-In First-Out basis.

  30. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES

  31. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Activity 3: Complete the following temperature record chart for 5 days to show a refrigerator which holds meat and dairy products. You will need to make up the information or use information from your workplace.

  32. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Storing Dry Goods Correctly storing dry goods is important for the same reasons as storing perishable goods. The major difference though is dry goods have a much longer shelf life than perishable goods. This though does not mean that you have to take less care when storing dry goods. Dry goods include things like rice, pasta, flour, sugar, tinned and bottled products, spices etc. Dry goods can spoil very quickly, or become contaminated, which means they cannot be used and have to be thrown away. Again costingthe business money

  33. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Dry goods can spoil in a number of ways, these include: • A moist, humid storage area without good air flow may encourage the growth of mould or yeasts spoiling flour, rice, pasta etc. • A dark dry store is a good environment for pests such as cockroaches, silverfish etc which can contaminate food • Storage areas not protected from the outside environment may encourage pests such as flies, birds, mice or rats to enter • A dirty dry store encourages pests by providing food for them • Dry goods not properly covered, sealed or stored on the ground, may allow easy access for pests which can contaminate food

  34. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES How to store Dry Goods Procedures to follow when storing dry goods Your business should recognise the importance of correctly storing dry goods to minimize the risks of food contamination, which may compromise food safety or food quality. • Dry, non-perishable foods are stored in a dry, cool, well ventilated, well lit andpest proof areas. • Foods are protected from exposure to moisture and direct sunlight. • Different food groups are stored separately. • Foods are stored well away from chemicals and cleaning equipment.

  35. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • Foods are stored to minimize the risk of contamination from Physical, Chemical or Micro Biological sources. • Foods are stored are stored off the floor, on shelving or in cupboards. • Packaged food which has been opened is stored in clean, non-toxic, food grade containers with tight fitting lids or are wrapped in protective food grade packaging, clearly identified and dated with date packaged. • Spilled foods are cleaned up promptly to minimize the risk of attracting pests and reduce the risks of contamination. • Foods are labelled with Receival Date prior to storage and are rotated on a First InFirst Out basis.

  36. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Food container storage Some products, when received from suppliers should be stored, in correctly labelled containers to avoid confusing one product with another, i.e. diced beef and diced lamb. When dry goods are opened from their original packets, they should be stored in containers with tight-fitting lids and low moisture content because grains, flours, etc., will attract rodents, weevils and other insects. All storage bins should be labelled clearly with the following: • What the product is • Date stored • Quantity of product • Par stock level (minimum and maximum stock level). Refrigerated Refrigerated products, i.e. meats and seafood, should be placed in covered containers on racks to allow drainage and air circulation. Frozen Frozen products should be well wrapped and placed in plastic containers labelled with date, quantity and product to prevent freezer burns.

  37. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Activity 4: What type of pests are most attracted to a dry good storage area? How can we prevent these pests attaching and contaminating our food?

  38. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • Specific food storage areas Frozen food storage • On receipt frozen foods must be stored immediately to prevent thawing. • Products should be segregated by individual types, i.e. vegetables, fruits, poultry, meat, and seafood, etc. • Temperature should be Minus 18ºC. NB: constant opening of the freezer doors will cause ice to build up.

  39. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Meat refrigerator • Should only be used for raw meats and must never be used for storing cooked foods, because of the risk of cross contamination. • Loose products should be placed on clean trays which are washed and sanitised daily. • Other raw meats, i.e. poultry, game and seafood), can be stored together with meat, but care must be taken not to store them too closely together. • Shelving, floors and walls must be cleaned regularly and disinfected minimise bacteria growth. • All products must be on shelves to allow adequate air circulation.

  40. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Fruit and vegetables • Cool room should be cleaned daily. • Vegetables and fruit should be kept separated (loose soils on some vegetables can have bacteria and other micro-organisms). • Polystyrene containers will insulate and maintain delicate green leafy vegetables and herbs, etc. • Most fruit and vegetable containers are suitable for storing in coolrooms. • The best temperature range for this area is between 4º – 6ºC. • 3ºC.

  41. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • Dry store • The dry store is an area where non-perishable, or long-life items that do not require refrigeration, are stored. These products, however, can be damaged if not handled carefully. • Stock must be rotated on a regular basis (as for all food items). • Check for presence of vermin, weevils in grains, etc. • Ensure the area is well ventilated and lit. • Place all cartons on shelves, not on the floor or passages. • Maintain a temperature between 12º – 15ºC. Dairy foods refrigeration • Dairy foods are highly absorbent and thus need to be stored away from strong smelling items, e.g. seafood or curries. • Maintain a temperature between 4º – 5ºC. • Keep the room well cleaned to prevent mould, mildew and odours developing.

  42. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Stock rotation The prevailing golden rule is ‘rotate stock’. This means that the oldest stock will be used first (first in, first out). It is important to maintain correct store procedures to assist in maintaining product shelf life and minimise food spoilage. Most establishments have a plan to make sure that old stock is shifted first. In housekeeping it is important for you to keep in mind that many products (especially consumables) cannot be used after a certain time. With foodstuffs, this will be the use by or best before date. The term used to identify stock rotation system is called First in First Out (FIFO) This means stock that comes in first is dispatched first. Stock rotation is important when putting goods away. In some instances linen may need to be rearranged before putting fresh stock away to ensure it does not become musty or damp.

  43. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Food Labels Some food such as cans, milk and packets of food already have food labels and use by dates on the food. However when you prepare food in a kitchen is usually no longer has the original labels to show you a use by or production date. Companies such as ‘Daydots” specialise in making food labels that you can purchase and place on food as you prepare it so that everybody in the kitchen knows exactly when that food was made. Available at www.daydots.com.au

  44. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Food segregation Foods with strong smells need to be stored separately from other foods which may absorb these odours. Some examples of products that should not be stored in the same area are: • Parmesan cheese • Blue vein cheese • Fish/seafood • Peeled garlic • Avocados • Cream • Onion • eggs

  45. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Slow moving items It is important to be aware of items that are not selling. This will be affected by the number of ingredients committed to maintaining the slower selling menu items. Stock left to sit on the shelf is money wasted. This will become evident during stock taking. Low selling ingredients need to be incorporated into other dishes, or be ordered less frequently.

  46. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Chemical storage Chemicals are used for cleaning purposes in the kitchen. As they are usually toxic and dangerous to touch, they should be treated with care. They should also not be stored with any foods. Chemicals should be stored in a cool, well-ventilated and dry area. Some chemicals should not even be stored together. If in doubt, discuss this with your Trainer. Never store chemicals and food together! Never store chemicals in empty food or drink containers!

  47. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Safe lifting procedures When stores are delivered they have to be moved to the correct storage areas. This often means lifting and carrying heavy goods. To ensure you or your staff do not injure themselves when physically moving the deliveries they should practice safe lifting procedures. When lifting heavy items, care should be taken that you protect yourself against injury and accidents. Injury can be avoided with some common sense lifting rules which include:

  48. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES • If it looks too heavy, do not lift it – get some help • Never bend from the waist only • Never lift heavy objects higher than your waist; • Avoid carrying awkward and/or unbalanced loads • Hold heavy objects close to the body (better leverage) • Where possible, use a hydraulic lifter or low trolley • Never climb shelves (monkey style) – use ladders • Ensure rooms are well lit to discourage pests such as cockroaches or silverfish • Store all heavy objects low to the ground for easy accessibility.

  49. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES How to lift properly Bend the knees and keep your back straight!!

  50. sitHCCC003aRECEIVE AND STORE KITCHEN SUPPLIES Unloading goods Sometimes cartons come with special signs or instructions on how they should be handled. Care must be taken because these instructions relate to the goods inside the cartons. Failure to follow carton instructions may result in damage to the goods. (In the case of dangerous goods, workers may be injured if these instructions are not followed). The labels on the following page demonstrate handling instructions: The descriptions for each are as follows: 1 – This Way Up This label means the containers should be stored with the arrow pointing up. This is to avoid damage to the goods or for safety reasons.