Combining sentences - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

general english n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Combining sentences PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Combining sentences

play fullscreen
1 / 23
Combining sentences
574 Views
Download Presentation
betty
Download Presentation

Combining sentences

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. General English Combining sentences

  2. Why combine sentences? • Sometimes two sentences will have the same subject, or follow the same theme; thus, it makes sense to combine two sentences into one long sentence. • When two sentences are combined together, the result is called a compound sentence.

  3. Clauses • A clause is a phrase containing a subject and a verb. • Independent clauses can stand on their own (i.e. simple sentences); dependent clauses can not. • What’s the difference between a cat and a simple sentence? • A cat has claws at the end of its paws, and a sentence has a pause at the end of its clause.

  4. General English Combining sentences: coordination

  5. Coordination • Coordination occurs when you combine two independent clauses to create one sentence. • Coordination allows both clauses to remain independent; this tells the reader that both clauses are of equal importance.

  6. Coordination • The following is an example of two independent clauses that could work together as a compound sentence: • The aliens didn’t invade our planet. • They partied all night with Aerosmith. • How can we combine them?

  7. Coordinating Conjunctions • One way to combine independent clauses is using the coordinating conjunctions, also referred to by the acronym “fanboys”: For And Nor But Or Yet So

  8. Coordinating Conjunctions For is used to indicate cause or reason. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, for they partied all night with Aerosmith. And is used to join two ideas; both parts of the sentence occurred. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, and they partied all night with Aerosmith.

  9. Coordinating Conjunctions Nor indicates that neither part of the sentence occurred. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, nor did they party all night with Aerosmith. But is used to contrast two ideas. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, but they partied all night with Aerosmith.

  10. Coordinating Conjunctions Or is used to offer an alternative or to show one option occurred to the exclusion of the other. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, or they partied all night with Aerosmith. Yetis used to indicate a surprising choice; often used to show that one thing happened in spite of another. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, yetthey partied all night with Aerosmith.

  11. Coordinating Conjunctions So is used to show that one thing caused another. The aliens didn’t invade our planet, so they partied all night with Aerosmith.

  12. Coordinating Conjunctions • When using a coordinating conjunction, the conjunction must be preceded by a comma. (ind. clause) + , + conjunction + (ind. clause) • The comma will take the place of whatever punctuation is used at the end of the first sentence.

  13. Semicolons • Another method for coordinating two independent clauses is through the use of a semicolon. (independent clause) + ; + (independent clause) • The semicolon will take the place of whatever punctuation is used to end the first sentence.

  14. Semicolons A great white shark met a gorilla. They instantly became best friends. Becomes A great white shark met a gorilla; they instantly became best friends.

  15. Semicolons + Transitions • You can also coordinate using a semicolon and a transitional expression. (ind. clause) + ; + transition + (ind. clause) • A great white shark met a gorilla; as a result, they instantly became best friends. • On page 284 of your books, there is a list of transitions that you can use, as well as their functions.

  16. Run-On Sentences • A run-on sentence occurs when we attempt to combine two sentences without using any form of coordination or subordination • A great white shark met a gorilla they instantly became best friends. • Reading the above sentence causes me physical pain.

  17. Comma Splice • A comma splice is a type of run-on sentence. It occurs when one attempts to combine two sentences using just a comma. A great white shark met a gorilla, they instantly became best friends. • This is completely incorrect! You can not combine two sentences using just a comma! You must include a coordinating conjunction after the comma.

  18. General English Combining sentences:subordination

  19. Subordination • Subordination occurs when you combine an independent clause with a dependent clause • One sentence is deliberately made into a dependent clause; this shows the reader that one piece of information is more important than the other • A sentence becomes a dependent clause when it is attached to a subordinating conjunction

  20. Subordination • Bill was attacked by bees. He won the Tour de France. • Which of these sentences contains the most important information? • Even though Bill was attacked by bees, he won the Tour de France.

  21. Subordination • I could not finish my research paper. My pet piranha was sick. • Which sentence contains the most important information? • I could not finish my research paper because my pet piranha was sick.

  22. Common Subordinating Conjunctions (page 291) • After • Although • As • as long as • As though • Because • Before • Even if • Even though • if • Provided that • Since • So that • That • Though • Unless • Until • When • Whenever • Where • Whereas • Wherever • Whether • While

  23. Subordination • If you are subordinating the first clause, put a comma between it and the independent clause • If you are subordinating the second clause, no comma is needed