Download
team initiated problem solving tips n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS)

Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS)

153 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) NC Scaling-Up Workgroup September 19, 2012

  2. “We are all continually faced with a series of great opportunities, brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems.” —John Gardner

  3. Rationale • Decision making is aided by access to data • Team meetings are a major context for data-based decision making • Providing instruction on how to embed data-based decision making in a problem solving model (TIPS) will result in problem solving that is • Thorough • Logical • Efficient • Effective • Structure of meetings lays foundation for efficiency and effectiveness Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  4. Problems & Problem Solving • Problem – Difference between expected/desired current • Problem identification - Finding a difference & determining if significant enough to require action now • Problem solving – Figuring out how to eliminate or reduce difference (Newton et al, 2009)

  5. Identify Problems Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeetingFoundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  6. Finding Differences • Look for Difference Between… • Desirable/Undesirable Trends • Where you data says you are and where you want to be (Newton et al, 2009)

  7. SET scores across school years

  8. SET scores across school years

  9. Do we have a Problem?

  10. Problem Statements • Write a “problem statement” that specifies the precise nature of the problem • More Ws (what, when, where, who, why) yield a more precise problem statement • The more precise the problem statement, the easier it will be to generate a solution that “fits” the problem (Newton et al, 2009)

  11. “Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise.” –Bertrand Russell

  12. Achieving a Precise Problem Statement 1. Identify the problem 2. Define and clarify the problem 3. Confirm (or disconfirm) logical inferences 4. Write a precise Problem Statement (Newton et al, 2009)

  13. Precise Problem Statement Example • Who: School Teams; PBIS Implementing Schools (those submitting data) • What: Lower statewide scores on Data subscale of IIO, and Monitoring subscale of SET • Where: PBIS implementing schools across the state • When: IIO – beginning in 2007 with first collection; SET – drop in 2009-10 (Newton et al, 2009)

  14. Beginning to Develop a Problem-Solving Action Plan • Once you have identified, defined, clarified, and confirmed the nature of a problem, write your precise Problem Statement as one element of your “Problem-Solving Action Plan” • See Problem Statement section of P-S Action Plan for our state data example (Newton et al, 2009)

  15. Identify Problems Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeetingFoundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  16. The Hypothesis… • Is best explanation for what the data and your experience tell you • Answers the “why” for the other Ws you discovered (Newton et al, 2009)

  17. Hypothesis • Is best explanation for what the data and your experience tell you • Provides a possible “why” for other Ws you discovered • AND guides you toward possible solutions (Newton et al, 2009)

  18. Identify Problems Then Define & Clarify (What, When, Where, Who); use Custom Reports to write Precise Problem Statement on Action Plan Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  19. Building Solutions • Keep problem statement in focus • Solutions reduce or eliminate problem • Brainstorm all ideas for decreasing the problem • prevention, teaching, acknowledgment, correction & extinction, safety • Determine which solution you will implement now (Newton et al, 2009)

  20. Solutions – Generic Strategies • Prevent: remove or alter “trigger” for problem behavior • Define & Teach: provide instruction in expected behavior • Reward/reinforce: expected/alternative behavior; prompt for it, as necessary • Withhold reward/reinforcement for the problem behavior, if possible (Extinction) • Use non-rewarding/non-reinforcing corrective consequences when problem behavior occurs (Newton et al, 2009)

  21. TIPS Worksheet

  22. Choosing Solution Actions • Choose the solutions that will create an environment that makes the problem irrelevant, inefficient, and ineffective • Choose least amount of work that will have the biggest impact on decreasing the problem • Implementing the solution requires action and time lines • Problems need goals so that we can measure progress and know when to move on

  23. Module Revisions • Content changes to address needs identified by statewide data • Inclusion of TIPS • Emphasis on Action Planning

  24. Identify Problems Then Define & Clarify (What, When, Where, Who); use Custom Reports to write Precise Problem Statement on Action Plan Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  25. P-S Action PlanGoal for a Problem… • What will the data tell you when you answer, ‘no’, to the question: do we have a problem? • Base on team-established standard • Satisfaction ratings • Easier to monitor if quantifiable • Percent reduction or increase • Absolute reduction or increase (Newton et al, 2009)

  26. Identify Problems Then Define & Clarify (What, When, Where, Who); use Custom Reports to write Precise Problem Statement on Action Plan Quick Review Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  27. Evaluation Planning Requires • An observable goal for decreasing the problem • A plan for measuring fidelity of implementation • A plan for measuring outcomes of the intervention

  28. Evaluate & Revise Action Plan • How and when will we measure fidelity of implementation? • Strategy for gathering this information written into plan • Review current implementation status at meetings • If fidelity of implementation of Solution Actions incomplete or poor… • provide additional information/support to implementers? • assign to another person? • revise timeline for implementation? (Newton et al, 2009)

  29. Evaluate & Revise Action Plan • When fidelity of implementation is strong, use data for monitoring progress toward goal • Team decision about success of solution is based on • Goal • Timeline & Decision Rule – Rough idea of when to consider revising hypothesis and/or solutions if desired results not being achieved • What data will be used to measure outcomes of plan? • How often will the data be reviewed? (Newton et al, 2009)

  30. If Solution Not Working • Check fidelity of implementation • Revise timeline only? • Solution may need more time • Students must come into “contact” with solution for it to have effect • Revise hypothesis? • Revise solution actions to fit retained or revised hypothesis? • Some problems may require several cycles (illustrates nature of data-based decision making) • Let data guide you…then update plan and try again (Newton et al, 2009)

  31. Data Decision Rules • Ongoing evaluation highlights trends used to create data decision rules • Guidelines used to make decisions based on data • Helpful for structuring service delivery: • The level of support needed • The intensity of support needed • When supports should be initiated • When supports might be phased out

  32. Data Decision Rules Examples • Disciplinary data: • 0-1 Office referrals= Core • 2-5 Office referrals= Core + Supplemental • 6 or more Office referrals= Core + Supplemental + Intensive • Blood Pressure: • 120/80= Normal • 139/89= Pre-hypertension • 159/99= Stage 1 Hypertension • 160/100= Stage 2 Hypertension

  33. Identify Problems Quick Review Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  34. Effective Problem-Solving • Uses data to drive decisions • Is aided by a standardized process • Is strengthened by stakeholder participation • Includes actionable plans implemented with fidelity • Improves with continuous assessment and evaluation • Reveals trends and outcomes that be used to drive future innovation and policy

  35. References Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual. Sugai, G., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, R., Barrett, S., Lewis, T., Anderson, C., Bradley, R., Choi, J. H., Dunlap, G., Eber, L., George, H., Kincaid, D., McCart, A., Nelson, M., Newcomer, L., Putnam, R., Riffel, L., Rovins, M., Sailor, W., Simonsen, B. (2010). School-wide positive behavior support: Implementers’ blueprint and self-assessment. Eugene, OR: University of Oregon.