Download
writing proposals n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Writing Proposals PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Writing Proposals

Writing Proposals

7 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Writing Proposals

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Writing Proposals Creating documents that result in money or resources D. G. Ross, Auburn University. Thanks to L. Palmer for initial organization

  2. A proposal outlines a problem, and shows your plan for solving it. Proposals sell you and your ideas. http://web.dcp.ufl.edu/ckibert/NSFProposal/2005-General/BilgeIAQProposal.pdf

  3. Proposals show you as an expert.

  4. Proposals show how, if you are paid, you will solve the problem.

  5. Proposals ultimately show how the requested funding/work will benefit society.

  6. Basic proposal types: • Internal versus external • Research versus goods and services • Solicited versus unsolicited

  7. The photocopiers at work are all old and slow. You write your boss and propose the company buy new copiers. You explain why they’re needed and how you’ll research the best model(s). • Is this internal or external? • Goods/Services or research? • Solicited or unsolicited?

  8. The Boss says “OK,” and gives you a budget and a quantity (10), so you phone Xerox and Toshiba. You give them your details and ask for proposals on models, $$, etc. Xerox and Toshiba send you proposals. Are these proposals: • Internal or external; solicited or unsolicited; research or goods/serv?

  9. A simple campus proposal Parking here can get messy. You see a way to fix it, so write a proposal to parking services asking for permission to research your idea. They say yes. Is this proposal: • Internal or external; solicited or unsolicited; research or goods/serv?

  10. Proposals can be any length, given the situation. Most proposals contain: • Introduction • Gives the basics and the background • Proposed Program • What you’ll do and how if your proposal is accepted • Qualifications/experience • Why you’re the best person for the job • Budget • What’s the cost for the research or the good/service? • Timeline • What are your expected deadlines and submission points?

  11. From Johnson-Sheehan, R. (2007). Technical Communication Today, 2nd ed. P. 603.

  12. Proposals fail when they: • Are written like an essay • Don’t include necessary components • Don’t suggest potential for use • Don’t think of audience well • Solve the problem

  13. Proposal Flow From Markel, M. (2012). Technical Communication, 10th ed. Bedford, St. Martin’s, p. 441.

  14. For this class: Write a research proposal You are seeking permission to carry out a research project in exchange for the organization's (authority's) granting you time and the other resources