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The Pigman

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The Pigman

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  1. The Pigman By: Paul Zindel

  2. Bell Ringer Verbals • A gerund is a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun.  • A participle is a verbal that is used as an adjective and most often ends in -ing or -ed.

  3. 4/8 Bell Ringer Identify the verbal in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • Editing papers was Evan's favorite part of the writing process. • The receding waves left a dark mark upon the golden sand. • The chiming bells announced the marriage of the happy couple.

  4. Bell Ringer Identify the verbal in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • Writing process - gerund • The receding waves - participle • The chiming bells - participle

  5. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Walter Dean Myers • In this short story, a teenager who is upset with his father learns a valuable lesson about the importance of family. Before students read the story, ask them to recall a time when they learned lesson from an adult who was not their parent. Invite volunteers to share their experiences with the class. • Ask students whether they sometimes find it easier to take advice from adults who are not their parents and why. After students read the story, ask them how Greg’s encounter with Lemon Brown might affect his relationship with his father. Then have students predict whether John and Lorraine’s friendship with Mr. Pignati will affect their relationships with their parents and why.

  6. Review Sheet 23 Due Friday!

  7. 4/5 Reflection • List three facts from our study of Civil Rights and integration that you learned. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

  8. Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. • Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. • Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. • Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style. • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

  9. Transition Words Chronological (words about the order of things) • First, second, third • Next, then • After • Following Cause-Effect (words about things which make other things happen) • So, thus • Therefore, hence • Consequently • Due to Example (words to show what a thing is) • One such, another • For instance, for example Addition (words that add more information) • Similarly, additionally • Another • Also • Moreover Opposition (words that signal a conflict or problem) • But, though, however • On the other hand • Conversely • Yet • Nonetheless, nevertheless

  10. Find an editorial from your local newspaper Read the essay. • Underline the transition words. Think about which category each transition word would fit into (chronological, cause-effect, etc.) • Now, take the transition words OUT of the essay (you can use a pen to cross them out or cover them with small pieces of tape or post-it notes). Read the essay again. • What happens when the transition words are taken out? • Does the essay sound funny or bad? • Why do you think this is the case?

  11. Civil Rights Writing Prompt • Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges. • Include textual evidence from your book and incidents from the video. • Use historical facts from the time period to support your similarities and differences.

  12. Graphic Organizer 1. Introduction • Hook – Get the reader involved using interesting fact, quote, or statement • Connect hook to topic – • Background Info – Venn, movie notes, and book • Thesis – based on writing prompt “Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges.”

  13. Graphic Organizer 2-4. Body Paragraphs • Transition & Topic Sentence – similarity, difference, difference. Pick the correct transition. • Introduce Quote – set up your quote with a fact • Quote – “obvious explanation” (122). • Explain Quote’s importance – connect b & c

  14. Graphic Organizer 5. Conclusion • Restate Thesis – remind reader about your topic • Restate Main Ideas – brief summary • Leave the reader - optional

  15. Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Literature: • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. • Analyze the extent to which a filmed of live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns or events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.

  16. The Pigman: Introduction • Published in 1968 • Genre: Realistic Fiction • Unique because few novels at that time addressed the pressures that teenagers face and used language that teenagers themselves use. • Main Characters: John Conlan and Lorraine Jensen. Both are HS Sophomores. • POV: 2 first-person narrators (John and Lorraine). • The Pigman = Angelo Pignati • Setting: Staten Island, New York in the late 1960’s • Read to discover the lessons John and Lorraine learn throughout their experiences with The Pigman.

  17. New City Boroughs

  18. The Pigman: Oath, Chapters 1 - 2 Before reading: • Who is your best friend? • Why is this person’s friendship important to you? Write a 5 sentence paragraph.

  19. The Pigman: Oath, Chapters 1 - 2 • Read the Oath, Chapter 1 (pg.1-6), and Chapter 2 (pg.7-15) • Complete WS for this section.

  20. 4/8 Reflection • Why do you think this book is called The Pigman? Summary Sheet for CH 1

  21. Bell Ringer Verbals • A gerund is a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun.  • A participle is a verbal that is used as an adjective and most often ends in -ing or -ed.

  22. 4/9 Bell Ringer Write the verbal/verbal phrase in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • The audience sat quietly as the maestro, stretching his arms, began to conduct the orchestra. • Swamped with tests, Stacy studied during all the free time she had. • Building model airplanes requires a lot of patience and time.

  23. Bell Ringer Identify the verbal in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • stretching his arms - participle • Swamped with tests - participle • Building model airplanes - gerund

  24. 4/8 Reflection • Why do you think this book is called The Pigman? Summary Sheet for CH 1

  25. Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Literature: • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. • Analyze the extent to which a filmed of live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns or events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.

  26. The Pigman: Oath, Chapters 1 - 2 • Read the Oath, Chapter 1 (pg.1-6), and Chapter 2 (pg.7-15) • Complete WS for this section.

  27. The Oath • Oath: Read the Oath and record 3 important things you learn from it. • ___________________________________ • ___________________________________ • ___________________________________

  28. The Oath • Oath: Read the Oath and record 3 important things you learn from it. • John and Lorraine attend Franklin High School • John and Lorraine are writing a “memorial” • Mr. Pignati has died recently

  29. Chapter 1 • Who is the narrator of Chapter 1? • Why was John called the “Bathroom Bomber”? • Explain John’s “fruit roll” prank. • Why are John and Lorraine writing this story? • Who is the Cricket and why is that her nickname?

  30. Chapter 1 • Who is the narrator of Chapter 1? John • Why was John called the “Bathroom Bomber”? He set off firecracker bombs in the bathroom. • Explain John’s “fruit roll” prank. Kids would steal Wednesday apples from cafeteria and roll them when they had subs. • Why are John and Lorraine writing this story? As a memorial to Mr. Pignati. • Who is the Cricket and why is that her nickname? Mrs. Reillen, librarian. She “outgrew” her clothes and her nylons rub when she walks.

  31. Figurative Language: For each type of figurative language listed, give an exact quote (with page #). • Simile: ________________________________ • Hyperbole: ____________________________ • Onomatopoeia: ________________________

  32. Figurative Language: For each type of figurative language listed, give an exact quote (with page #). Simile: • “like a herd of buffalo stampeding” (3). • “like St. Bernard that just lost its keg” (5). Hyperbole: • “you need a snug-fitting straitjacket” (6). • “before she has a heart attack” (6). Onomatopoeia: • “…so she makes this scraaaaaaatchy sound…” (6).

  33. 4/9 Reflection • Why is this book called The Pigman? Summary Sheet for CH 1-2

  34. Bell Ringer Verbals • A gerund is a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun.  • A participle is a verbal that is used as an adjective and most often ends in -ing or -ed.

  35. 4/10 Bell Ringer Write the verbal phrase in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • My dad always made inflating bicycle tires look like a piece of cake. • Brandon watched anxiously as his homemade volcano erupted because redoing the project was out of the question. • Sitting up straight was a problem for Tina, so she decided to practice every day.

  36. Bell Ringer Identify the verbal in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • inflating bicycle tires - gerund • redoing the project - gerund • Sitting up straight - gerund

  37. 4/9 Reflection • Why is this book called The Pigman? Summary Sheet for CH 2-4

  38. Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Literature: • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. • Analyze the extent to which a filmed of live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns or events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.

  39. Chapter 2 • Who is the narrator of Chapter 2? • What does John look like? • Explain the following quote: “He [John] always has to twist things subliminally.” • What does Lorraine think about John’s smoking? • What do you learn about Miss Stewart? • What is the big difference between John and Lorraine? • Why did John first get involved with The Pigman? • What was the real reason, according to Lorraine?

  40. Chapter 2 • Who is the narrator of Chapter 2? Lorraine. • What does John look like? “Handsome,” 6 ft tall, brown hair, and blue eyes • Explain the following quote: “He [John] always has to twist things subliminally.” John likes to change events to make himself sound better. • What does Lorraine think about John’s smoking? To assert independence. • What do you learn about Miss Stewart? She has a sick mom. • What is the big difference between John and Lorraine? Lorraine has compassion. • Why did John first get involved with The Pigman? To get beer and cig money • What was the real reason, according to Lorraine? John has compassion hidden.

  41. Complete the chart to record what you learn in these chapters about John and Lorraine.

  42. Complete the chart to record what you learn in these chapters about John and Lorraine.

  43. Vocabulary • Gestapo • Avocation • Incandescent • Thrombosis • Analyze • Paranoia • Mortified

  44. Vocabulary • Gestapo – Nazi police • Avocation - hobby • Incandescent – glowing white with heat • Thrombosis – coagulation of blood anywhere in the Circulatory System • Analyze – to look closely at • Paranoia – mental disorder characterized by delusions • Mortified – humiliate or shame

  45. 4/10 Reflection • Explain why Lorraine thinks John drinks so much. Summary Sheet for CH 1-2 Put book in top right corner of desk

  46. Bell Ringer Verbals • A gerund is a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun.  • A participle is a verbal that is used as an adjective and most often ends in -ing or -ed.

  47. 4/11 Bell Ringer Identify the verbal phrase in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • The class elections, held in the spring, ignited a huge debate among the eighth graders. • Before Ava left for college, her mother, worried about her, wanted to impart some advice. • Adorned with sprigs of flowers, Rhea looked radiant in her black silk dress.

  48. Bell Ringer Identify the verbal in each sentence and label it either a gerund or participle. • ignited a huge debate - participle • worried about her - participle • Adorned with sprigs of flowers - participle

  49. 4/10 Reflection • Explain why Lorraine thinks John drinks so much. Summary Sheet for CH 1-2 Put book in top right corner of desk

  50. Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Literature: • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. • Analyze the extent to which a filmed of live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns or events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.