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Hindu Perspectives

Hindu Perspectives

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Hindu Perspectives

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  1. Dialogue Education Hindu Philosophy Hindu Perspectives THIS CD HAS BEEN PRODUCED FOR TEACHERS TO USE IN THE CLASSROOM. IT IS A CONDITION OF THE USE OF THIS CD THAT IT BE USED ONLY BY THE PEOPLE FROM SCHOOLS THAT HAVE PURCHASED THE CD ROM FROM DIALOGUE EDUCATION. (THIS DOES NOT PROHIBIT ITS USE ON A SCHOOL’S INTRANET).

  2. You Tube - Hinduism Click on the image to the left. You will need to be connected to the internet to view this presentation. Enlarge to full screen.

  3. Click on the image above for a game of “Teacher invader”. Try playing the game with your students at the start and the end of the unit. Make sure you have started the slide show and are connected to the internet. Teacher Invader

  4. Hindu philosophy is divided into six schools of thought, or , which accept the Vedas as supreme revealed scriptures. Hindu Philosophy

  5. The nāstika schools do not accept the Vedas as authoritative: 1. Buddhism 2. Jainism 3. Cārvāka Hindu Philosophy

  6. In Hindu history, the distinction of the six orthodox schools was current in the Gupta period "golden age" of Hinduism. Hindu Philosophy

  7. Samkhya is the oldest of the orthodox philosophical systems in Hinduism. Hindu Philosophy

  8. In Indian philosophy, Yoga is the name of one of the six orthodox philosophical schools. Hindu Philosophy

  9. The intimate relationship between Samkhya and Yoga is explained by Heinrich Zimmer: "These two are regarded in India as twins, the two aspects of a single discipline…..” Hindu Philosophy

  10. The foundational text of the Yoga school is the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, who is regarded as the founder of the formal Yoga philosophy. Hindu Philosophy

  11. Nyaya The Nyaya school is based on the Nyaya Sutras. Hindu Philosophy

  12. Nyaya This methodology is based on a system of logic that has subsequently been adopted by the majority of the Indian schools. Hindu Philosophy

  13. Nyaya Nevertheless, Nyaya was seen by its followers as more than logical in its own right.. Hindu Philosophy

  14. Vaisheshika The Vaisheshika school was founded by Kanada and postulates that all objects in the physical universe are reducible to certain types of atoms. Hindu Philosophy

  15. Purva Mimamsa The main objective of the Purva Mimamsa school was to establish the authority of the Vedas. Hindu Philosophy

  16. Purva Mimamsa The Mimamsa accepted the logical and philosophical teachings of the other schools, but felt they did not sufficiently emphasize attention to right action. Hindu Philosophy

  17. Purva Mimamsa The Mimamsa school later shifted its views and began to teach the doctrines of Brahman and freedom. Hindu Philosophy

  18. Vedanta The Vedanta, or later Mimamsa school, concentrates on the philosophical teachings of the Upanishads rather than the ritualistic injunctions of the Brahmanas. Hindu Philosophy

  19. Vedanta While the traditional Vedic rituals continued to be practised as meditative and propitiatory rites, a more knowledge-centered understanding began to emerge. Hindu Philosophy

  20. Vedanta The more abstruse Vedanta is the essence of the Vedas, as encapsulated in the Upanishads. Hindu Philosophy

  21. Vedanta The aphorisms of the Vedanta sutras are presented in a cryptic, poetic style, which allows for a variety of interpretations. Hindu Philosophy

  22. Advaita Advaita literally means "non-duality." Hindu Philosophy

  23. Advaita According to this school of Vedanta, Brahman is the only reality, and there exists nothing whatsoever which is not Brahman. Hindu Philosophy

  24. Advaita When a person tries to know Brahman through his mind, due to the influence of Maya, Brahman appears as God (Ishvara), separate from the world and from the individual. Hindu Philosophy

  25. Visishtadvaita Ramanujacharya (1040–1137) was the foremost proponent of the concept of the Supreme Being having a definite form, name, and attributes. Hindu Philosophy

  26. Dvaita Dvaita means "Dualism". Madhvacharya (1238–1317) identified Brahman with Vishnu, but his view of reality was pluralistic. Hindu Philosophy

  27. Dvaitadvaita (Bhedabheda) Dvaitadvaita was proposed by Nimbarka, a 13th century Vaishnava Philosopher from the Andhra region. Hindu Philosophy

  28. Acintya Bheda Abheda Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (1486–1534), was stating that the soul or energy of God is both distinct and non-distinct from God, whom he identified as Krishna and that this, although unthinkable, may be experienced through a process of loving devotion (bhakti). Hindu Philosophy

  29. * Chatterjee, Satischandra; Datta, Dhirendramohan (1984). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy (Eighth Reprint Edition ed.). Calcutta: University of Calcutta. • * Garbe, Richard. The Philosophy of Ancient India. BiblioBazaar. p. 11. ISBN 9781110403776. http://books.google.com/books?id=RcqsC1UE-DkC&pg=PA11. • * Dasgupta, Surendranath (1992). A history of Indian philosophy, Volume 1. MotilalBanarsidass Publ.. p. 258. ISBN 9788120804128. http://books.google.com/books?id=PoaMFmS1_lEC&pg=PA258. • * Müeller, Max (1899). Six Systems of Indian Philosophy; Samkhya and Yoga, Naya and Vaiseshika. Calcutta: Susil Gupta (India) Ltd.. ISBN 0-7661-4296-5. Reprint edition; Originally published under the title of The Six Systems of Indian Philosophy. • http://books.google.com/books?id=opREzSOGRV4C&pg=PA6. • * Radhakrishnan, S.; Moore, CA (1967). A Sourcebook in Indian Philosophy. Princeton. ISBN 0-691-01958-4. • * Sarles, Harvey (9780816613533). Language and human nature: toward a grammar of interaction and discourse. University of Minnesota Press. p. 6. • Wikipedia- Hindu Philosophy- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_Philosophy • * Zimmer, Heinrich (1951). Philosophies of India. New York, New York: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01758-1. Bollingen Series XXVI; Edited by Joseph Campbell. Bibliography