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What is the message of this cartoon? PowerPoint Presentation
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What is the message of this cartoon?

What is the message of this cartoon?

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What is the message of this cartoon?

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  1. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  2. What is the message of this cartoon?

  3. To do this question, you need first to borrow two concepts from English: Denotation (what you see) Connotation (how it affects its audience) This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  4. Denotation The building ‘Western Europe’ is about to fall down; the prop ‘self help’ is not strong enough to stop it. Connotation The rickety building suggests neglect and failure – Europe’s problems were its own fault. Meaning The war has ruined the western democracies, which cannot unaided get their economies going, and are in danger of turning communist. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  5. Denotation Marshall, sleeves rolled up, is lifting the huge prop labelled ‘American Aid’. Connotation ‘sleeves rolled up’ = effort and an attitude of determination. Meaning Marshall’s proposals would pump into the European economy the billions of dollars necessary to get it going again. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  6. Denotation Uncle Sam is sat on the prop smoking a cigarette. Connotation Resting = uninclined to act. Sat on the prop = actively stopping Marshall going to work. Meaning Many Americans were isolationist, did not see why they should give away American taxpayers’ taxes, and opposed Marshall Aid. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  7. Denotation The American house is very affluent, and has lots of tools. Connotation Reminds you of Churchill’s request during the war: ‘give us the tools and we will finish the job’. Meaning ONLY America has the wealth and economic strength to get the European economy going. They MUST intervene to stop a disaster. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  8. Denotation The house ‘western Europe’ is about to fall on the wealthy house next door. Connotation It is in the rich house’s self-interest to mend the house next door! Meaning Shepard is saying that, if western Europe falls to communism, America will be next (i.e. this is an early version of the ‘domino theory’). This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  9. (By the way have you noticed…) Denotation Marshall is saying: ’It’s up to us AGAIN’. Connotation A reference to the American belief that, by entering the war, THEY had ‘saved’ the world for democracy. Meaning Shepard is ‘buttering’ up the Americans, appealing to their vanity and self-congratulation. It is a VERY pro-American cartoon. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  10. Denotation The house next door is ‘WESTERN’ Europe. Connotation Originally, the Marshall Plan was for ALL Europe, but Stalin had made the Iron Curtain countries pull out. Meaning The cartoon shows how, by October 1947, the British public had come to see that the Iron Curtain and Cold War were unchangeable realities. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  11. Finally, always remember to look at: Origin (who drew it) Date (when it was published) This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  12. Date 1 October 1947. Details Four months after the Marshall Plan, when there was a real chance that Congress was going to reject it. Significance Shepard is warning people that without Marshall Aid there will be a economic and political disaster in western Europe. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.

  13. Origin The British cartoonist EH Shepard. Details Shepard was a very knowledgeable and perceptive commentator. Significance This cartoon is aimed at America as much as at the British public – it is an appeal as much as a comment. This cartoon of 1 October 1947 drawn by EH Shepard for the British magazine Punch shows Marshall (on the left) telling 'Uncle Sam' : 'Come on Sam! It's up to us again'.