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Why ??? International Vaishnava Monastery in Europe PowerPoint Presentation
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Why ??? International Vaishnava Monastery in Europe

Why ??? International Vaishnava Monastery in Europe

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Why ??? International Vaishnava Monastery in Europe

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  1. Why ???International Vaishnava Monastery in Europe On behalf of all project partners Your humble servants BVG Janaka das www.OurMonastery.wordpress.com

  2. Why in Europe?

  3. Why in Europe?

  4. Why Now in Europe?

  5. Why Now in Europe?

  6. Why Now in Europe?

  7. Why Now in Europe?

  8. Hundreds of Monasteries in Europe Why a Monastery

  9. Why a Monastery

  10. Why a Monastery

  11. Why a Monastery

  12. Respecting the Western People History and Mentality Why a Monastery

  13. Monastery – Culturally acceptable to be Restricted Area for Women Why a Monastery

  14. 7 Monasteries in today Latvia Why a Monastery

  15. Monks and Monasterie in Germany Why a Monastery

  16. Why a Monastery

  17. Support Structure of Monasteries in Europe Why a Monastery

  18. Government Support Why a Monastery

  19. Government Support Conditions • Presenting our self as social workers, which anyway we do Why a Monastery • We can receive Government financial and law support, whenwe form properly documents, according to government laws, at least in Euro Continent 34 countries including Latvia, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden etc

  20. Government Support • Lifelong support for monks can be received in forms of food, closing, shelter and medicine (including hospital expenses). Why a Monastery • This is How so many other Monasteries are surviving and flourishing, Where ISKCON CAN learn

  21. Government Support for Outreach (Social Program) Why a Monastery

  22. Government Support for Outreach (Social Program) Why a Monastery

  23. Government Support for Outreach (Social Program) Why a Monastery

  24. Government Support for Outreach (Social Program) Why a Monastery

  25. What Kind Of Social work Govt Expects? Why a Monastery

  26. What Kind Of Social work Govt Expects? Why a Monastery

  27. What Kind Of Social work Govt Expects? Why a Monastery

  28. What Kind Of Social work Govt Expects? Why a Monastery

  29. What Kind Of Social work Govt Expects? Why a Monastery

  30. Why a Monastery

  31. Why International

  32. Why Patronage by Indians

  33. Why Patronage by Indians

  34. Why Patronage by Indians

  35. Why Patronage by Indians

  36. Thee Case Studies • Case Study 1 – Buddhist “Forest Sangha trust” 16 Monasteries • Forest Sangha trust (www.ForestSangha.org) at 2012 unite 16 Buddhist Monasteries in West including England, France, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Italy, Canada and the United States and 4 Monasteries in Thailand with 122 Western Monks (Eldest 45 year serve as monk) and 11 Western Nuns. Now trust setting up two new Monasteries - in Brazil and Portugal.

  37. Govt Support to Monastries • Amaravati Buddhist monastery (www.amaravati.org) have close cooperation with Thailand government, Embassies and local governments. Local and foreign governments and NGO’s support monk social security in terms of food, closing, shelter and medicine (including hospital expenses).

  38. Amaravati Monastery annual budget • The budget of the Amaravati Monastery at on 2011 was total: £348,000 (USD 525’600). Equivalent to approximately £6,700 per week or £950 per day. The figures exclude 'dana' for food and other gifts in kind on average £500-600 per day. • Average daily expenses per one Monastery resident including gifts £58 (USD 80). • 35 Monastery residents = monks 19 + 8 nun + 8 long time volunteers.

  39. Case Study 2 – Mount Athos with 20 Christian Monasteries

  40. Case Study 2 – Mount Athos with 20 Christian Monasteries and about 2000 Monks • After reaching a low point of just 1,145 mainly elderly monks in 1971, the monasteries have been undergoing a steady and sustained renewal. By the year 2000, the monastic population had reached 1,610, with all 20 monasteries receiving an infusion of mainly young well-educated monks. In 2009, the population stood at nearly 2,000 monks, where many younger monks possess university education and advanced skills.

  41. Mount Athos with 20 Christian Monasteries and about 2000 Monks • In all Mount Athos (www.WikiPedia.org and www.AthosWeBlog.com) territory (335 km2 or 130 sq mi) is a prohibition on entry for women, to make living in celibacy easier for those who have chosen to do so. Monks feel that the presence of women alters the social dynamics of the community and therefore slows their path towards spiritual enlightenment.