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Confusing Irregular Verbs

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Confusing Irregular Verbs

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  1. Confusing Irregular Verbs

  2. Review • What is a regular verb? • What is an irregular verb?

  3. Lie vs. Lay Definitions: LIE= LAY= to rest or recline to place or put

  4. (has) lain (is) lying lay (is) laying (has) laid laid

  5. Notice this? • The past form of lie and the present form of lay are the same!

  6. TIP Typically, lay requires a direct object.

  7. Examples • I (lie, lay) in bed for a long time on Saturday mornings. • My mother (lies, lays) my little sister’s clothes out every morning. • (Lie, Lay) the tablecloth out for dinner tonight.

  8. TIP Double check sentences without direct objects. If the verb can be replaced by the definition (placed or put), then use lay.

  9. Examples • The books (lay, laid) on the table. • Go (lie, lay) on the couch for a while. • The vegetables have been (lay, laid) out on the platter.

  10. Sit vs. Set Definitions: SIT= SET= to rest or recline to place or put

  11. (is) sitting (has) sat sat (has) set (is) setting set

  12. TIP Typically set requires a direct object.

  13. Examples: • The student (sat, set) in his desk. • The teacher (sat, set) the papers on the table.

  14. TIP Occasionally, set will not have a direct object. Remember the definition and see if you can replace the verb with placed or put.

  15. Examples • The books have been (sat, set) on the table. • I (sat, set) the cat down on the table. • I (sat, set) on the chair. • (Sat, Set) the box over there.

  16. Rise vs. Raise Definitions: RISE= RAISE= to go up without help to go up with help

  17. (has) risen (is) rising rose (has) raised (is) raising raised

  18. Tip • Typically, raise requires a direct object.

  19. Examples • I (rose, raised) early this morning. • The bread (is rising, is raising). • We can (rise, raise) the money for charity.

  20. Tip Remember the definitions of rise and raise. If the object goes up on its own, then use rise. If the object requires help, then use raise. Check the definitions even if the sentence has no direct object.

  21. Examples • The sun (rose, raised) this morning. • The flag (rose, was raised) early this morning. • (Rise, Raise) your hands, please.