Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WHAT IS A RESUME? (WHAT IS NOT A RESUME?) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WHAT IS A RESUME? (WHAT IS NOT A RESUME?)

WHAT IS A RESUME? (WHAT IS NOT A RESUME?)

167 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

WHAT IS A RESUME? (WHAT IS NOT A RESUME?)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. WHAT IS A RESUME? (WHAT IS NOT A RESUME?) A resume is a short, professional account of your career, qualifications, and accomplishments. Right Management Consultants The purpose of a resume is to get you in the door for an interview! How to Write a Winning Resume, Deborah Perlmutter Bloch A resume is not your life story told in detail! The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  2. 5 STEPS TO RESUME DEVELOPMENT Step 1 Gather information, decide what to include Step 2 Choose your Resume format Step 3 Sections of the Resume Step 4 Write a Resume draft Step 5 Critique your Resume The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  3. GATHER INFORMATION, DECIDE WHAT TO INCLUDE Step 1 • Understand your purpose • Specific job in mind: Tailor your resume to meet the requirements of the position • No specific job in mind: Consider the type of job you want and include relevant skills and experiences • Create a data file • List items key to your resume, gather information and write notes about previous work experiences, resumes, transcripts, certifications, presentations, licenses, curriculum created, awards, honors, volunteer work, internships & anything relevant • Decide what to include • May vary from job to job, consider: what skills I use, what I do best, skills developed, satisfying work experiences, experiences, important components of education, unique experiences or talents The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  4. CHOOSE FORMAT(SEE EXAMPLE RESUMES) Step 2 Reverse Chronological: Skills Based / Functional: -Continuing in the same occupation/ industry. -Steady growth in career, no gaps. -Name of last employer is important. -Highly traditional fields such as education & government. -Making a significant career or job change. -Employed by the same organization for a long time. -You want to emphasize skills and capabilities more than titles and progression. -Held many jobs, similar in nature. Combine formats to develop a custom hybrid The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  5. Step 3 SECTIONS OF A RESUME • Typical Resume Sections • Contact information • Profile or summary of qualifications • Professional (work) experience • Education • Skills & Accomplishments • Optional Sections • Technical skills, computer skills * • Community involvement • Professional associations, involvement • Awards • Publications, presentations * (* if extensive create an addendum page) • Length of a Resume • Typically 1 to 2 pages. In initial writing stages don’t be concerned about length The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  6. WRITE A RESUME DRAFT Step 4 • With your objective (Step 1) and format in mind (Step 2) • Think of the sections you want to include. • Develop an outline. • Organize the information you will include. • Begin by writing the easiest section! Often this is the Contact information and Education sections. • Continue writing until you have a rough draft. • Use keywords • Words or phrases specific to an organization or profession. • Keywords can communicate multiple skills and qualifications. • Clues are contained in the job posting and through networking, talking with current employees of a department or profession. • Use keywords at the beginning of your resume, in the summary section or in titles or sections of a skill-based resume. Cover letters are another good place for keywords (as is the interview). The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  7. WRITING ABOUT SKILLS & ACCOMPLISHMENTS Accomplishment statements can be an important addition to your resume. Use the guide below to create your own. • Define a challenge, a problem or situation you faced, such as being required to: • Meet objectives with same or fewer resources. • Increase efficiency. • Develop something for the first time. • Prepare original papers, reports, articles. • Manage work group or department. • Save the organization money. • Increase production. 2. Describe the actions you took to meet the challenge. • Explain the results of your actions. • Put your challenge action and result into a direct and descriptive statement (see examples next page). Challenge: Actions: Results: The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  8. WRITING ABOUT SKILLS & ACCOMPLISHMENTS (Sample Accomplishment Statements) • Reorganized office files using a color-coded system which resulted in 20% improvement in retrieval of key documents. • Set up overtime reporting system which consolidated three systems into one. • Developed a fund raising campaign for nationally recognized University department that provided contributions exceeding $90,000, three times the previous record. • Achieved a customer satisfaction rating of 99.9% by developing a high level of proficiency on new software during a two-month systems conversion. The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  9. Step 5 CRITIQUE YOUR RESUME • Evaluate the content • Does the resume present your strengths up front? Does the order make sense? Have you quantified your accomplishments? Does the information provide a clear and complete picture? Have others read your resume and provided feedback? • Use Power words and action verbs • Make every word work for you. Have you created a sense of enthusiasm? • Is your resume focused? • Is your resume targeted toward the reason you are writing the resume? Is everything relevant? • Does the format highlight your strengths? • Is reverse chronological or skills-based format better? Sometimes you may use a combination of both. The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  10. CRITIQUE YOUR RESUME CONTINUED… • Where are the gaps in your resume? • Compare the duties and requirements that you have highlighted in your resume to the job posting or job description. What is missing? Do not assume that the reader of the resume will assume anything. Make it easy for the reader to see you are qualified. • Length of the Resume • Keep in mind that the average employer spends 35-40 seconds scanning a resume. If the resume is too short you may not be giving yourself enough credit. • Are section heading appropriate? • Is “Work History” the best description or “Professional Experience” or “Relevant Experience.” Make the headings work for you. • References • Current practice is to assume references are available, hence no need to include, “References available upon request” The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  11. SCANNABLE & ELECTRONIC RESUMES • Use clean easy-to-read font (Times, TNR, Garamond, Arial) • Keep all text between 10 and 14 points. • Remove italics and bolding or underlining. Use all caps to emphasize words. • Bullet points should be changed to an asterisk*, dash -, or plus sign +. • Limit the use of shading, graphics, or decorative lines. • Submitting Electronic Resumes • Save your resume as “text only” or “plain text” version. • Reset margins to: 1” for left margin and 3” for right. • All text should be flush left. • Text lines no longer than 60 characters. • Do not use TABS. Instead use the space bar. • If your resume is more than one page, eliminate any references to page 2. Your resume will read as one page. The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  12. COVER LETTERS / LETTERS OF INTEREST (TO ACCOMPANY RESUME) • Purpose • Interest the reader in your resume and a personal interview. • Offer another perspective to the reader on your strengths, experience and contributions. • Add value and support the resume. • Confirm details of a position. • Choose your words carefully • Avoid jargon and overly formal terms. Be positive. • Write the way you speak • Be yourself! • Sentences & paragraphs • Vary the length, use keywords, keep same verb tense. • Brief & to the point, write with the reader in mind. The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising

  13. REVISE, POLISH & CUSTOMIZE Effective resumes and cover letters are revised and customized to match the key words and skills identified in the job posting/job description. Accomplishment statements allow you to provide context, strengths and the resulting impact of your actions to the reader. The right resume format will make it easier to determine your fit for the position. Keep cover letters brief, a single page is generally the most effective presentation. For additional support… Human Resources Employee & Career Advising 621-2376 or 626-0850 www.hr.arizona.edu/ecadvising The University of Arizona – Human Resources Employee & Career Advising