Download
the next disaster are you as a nurse prepared n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared?

The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared?

179 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared? Welcome to the Ohio Nurses Association

  2. Why are we concerned about disasters? • According to FEMA, Major Disaster Declarations have steadily increased since 1953 • #13 in 1953 • #81 in 2010 • #99 in 2011 • #47 in 2012 • #11 in 2013 as of 2 Apr 2013 and climbing (Oklahoma – May 20, 2013) Are You Prepared?

  3. #1 Disaster in Ohio

  4. #1 Disaster in Ohio – Severe Storms

  5. Objective • Objective – Describe steps nurses can take to be better prepared both personally and professionally for a disaster

  6. Preparing Your Home/Work • Getting Informed – know the warning systems and signals for your area • National weather service • Television announcements • Radio announcements

  7. Preparing Your Home/Work • Evacuating yourself and your family. Hold a family meeting to discuss where you would all meet to evacuate from these locations: • Your home and community • Your children’s schools • Your place of work

  8. Preparing Your Home/Work • Evacuating yourself and your family out of the community – Escape Routes • Near the home • In the local community • Outside the community

  9. Preparing Your Home/Work • Evacuating yourself and your co-workers out of the workplace – Escape Routes, i.e. which stairwell do you use? What if it’s blocked? • Near your workplace – have you identified a gathering place? i.e. a certain corner of the parking lot • In the local community – i.e. another facility, a certain building? • Outside the community – another town or city?

  10. Preparing Your Home/Work • Family Communications • Complete a contact card for each family member • Set cell phones with “ICE” cell phone numbers ICE = In Case of Emergency

  11. Preparing Your Home/Work • Locate Utility Shut-offs • Natural Gas • Water • Electricity Find these items in your home – know how to shut them off

  12. Preparing Your Home/Work • Insurance and Vital Records • Flood Insurance – Do you need it? • Inventory Home/Work Possessions • Important Documents • Money Keep important items in a safe and secure location, i.e. safe, safe-deposit box

  13. Preparing Your Home/Work • Special Needs • Disability/Special Needs, i.e. sight and/or hearing impaired, mobility impaired, etc

  14. Preparing Your Home/Work • Caring for Animals • Shelter for Pets • Pet Supplies including food, medications • Pet ID tags • Pet Carriers/leashes

  15. Preparing Your Home/Work • Caring for Animals • Veterinary records (most kennels will require records) • What hotels/motels allow pets? • Emergency Shelters may not allow pets Check these out BEFORE a disaster!

  16. Preparing Your Home/Work • Safety Skills • Learn CPR and Basic First Aid • Obtain and Know How to use a Fire Extinguisher

  17. Preparing Your Home/Work • Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit • Home, Work, Vehicle Keep it simple – food, water, basic first aid supplies, clothing

  18. Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

  19. Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

  20. Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

  21. Preparing Your Home/Work Home/Work Disaster Kit

  22. Preparing Your Home/Work Home/Work Disaster Kit

  23. Preparing Your Home/Work • Water • How much? One gallon per person per day • How should it be stored? Best – commercially bottled water • Remember: even bottled water has an expiration date. Rotate bottled water as necessary • Store in containers you can lift and move

  24. Preparing Your Home/Work • Food • Avoid foods that make you thirsty (i.e. choose low sodium foods) • Stock foods that require no refrigeration • Canned goods, dry mixes (don’t forget the can opener and don’t forget that dry mixes will require water to reconstitute) • Store items in pest-proof containers

  25. Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz Which of these foods would you choose to have in your disaster kit?

  26. Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz - Answers There is no perfect food to put in your disaster kit. Consider the following: What foods will you and/or your family eat? – no sense putting items in your disaster kit that no one will eat Food allergies – keep this in mind as your decide on food items Does a food item require special preparation?

  27. Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz - Answers There is no perfect food to put in your disaster kit. Consider the following: 4) Is the food item too heavy to carry long distances? 5) Cost – can you afford special survival foods? 6) Food items expire – keep track and rotate Bottom line: Pack what you and your family can and will eat

  28. Preparing Your Home/Work Issues to consider when choosing food items: 1) Size 2) Cost 3) Weight 4) Shelf life 5) Movement 6) Likes/dislikes by family members 7) Ease of use/Food preparation requirements 8) Medical concerns of family members, i.e. allergies

  29. Preparing Your Home/Work • Food • What foods should you store? • Best determined by family needs and desires, i.e. allergy issues, diabetic foods • Based on family use, provide a 3-day supply of food items • Commercially available ‘disaster’ foods are good – but costly and some do not taste very good. Sold at sporting goods stores, some grocery stores Remember: Food items have expiration dates!!

  30. Preparing Your Home/Work • Basic Disaster Supplies Kit • Three-day supply of food and water • Portable, battery operated radio/TV • Flashlight/extra batteries (rotate every 6 months) • First aid kit and manual • Hygiene items • Matches/lighter • Whistle • Extra Clothing

  31. Preparing Your Home/Work • Basic Disaster Supplies Kit Kitchen accessories/cooking utensils • Photocopies of credit cards/ID cards • Cash and coins (how much?) • Special needs items (prescription meds, eye glasses) • Items for infants • Other items as needed

  32. Preparing Your Home/Work • Basic Disaster Supplies Kit • Clothing: • Needs to be seasonal • Cold weather items • Coats/sweaters if power goes off • Long pants/shirts • Extra sturdy shoes • Hats, mittens, gloves • Sleeping bag or blankets for each person

  33. Preparing Your Home/Work • Maintaining Your Disaster Supplies Kit • Store food items in climate controlled conditions • Store food items in pest-proof containers (metal if possible) • Discard canned goods that swell, get dented or corroded • Watch for expiration dates on food items – keep a list • Rotate food/water every 6 months (per expiration dates) • Update items as family needs change • Place items in containers that are easy to carry/move, i.e. ice chest on wheels, boxes that fit on a small cart or dolly, backpack

  34. Preparing Your Home/Work • Shelter – be prepared to move to appropriate shelters • Manage water carefully • Obtain water from reliable sources • Manage food supplies carefully • Cook safely • Store food safely

  35. Preparing Your Home/Work • Don’t forget your motor vehicles!!! • First Aid Kit • Non-Latex Gloves • Emergency Tool • Seasonable supplies $15-$20 at most automotive or discount stores

  36. Preparing Your Home/Work Practice Your Home/Work Safety Plan!!!!!!!!!!!

  37. Natural & Man-Made Disasters

  38. Natural Hazards Natural hazards are natural events that threaten lives, property, and other assets. Often natural hazards can be predicted. They tend to occur repeatedly in the same geographical locations because they are related to weather patterns or physical characteristics of an area.

  39. Natural Hazards Tornadoes Forrest Fires Blizzards Flooding Hurricanes

  40. Natural Hazards Earthquakes Dust storms Tsunamis Volcanoes

  41. Natural Hazards • Floods: the most common hazard in the United States. Some floods develop slowly, others can happen very quickly with devastating effect. Flash floods are particularly dangerous. Not just from the wall of fast moving water but also from the debris, rocks and mud that often accompany flash floods.

  42. Natural Hazards • Flood terminology: • Flood watch: Flooding is possible. Tune in to a NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information • Flash flood watch: Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather radio, commercial radio or television for information • Flood warning: Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately • Flash flood warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately

  43. Lesson 2 - Natural Hazards

  44. Natural Hazards

  45. Natural Hazards • If a flood is likely in your area: • Listen to the radio or television for instructions • Be aware of the potential for flash flooding near your home • Be aware of the potential for flash flooding in areas you might be traveling through as you evacuate

  46. Natural Hazards • Evacuation tips: • Do NOT try to walk through moving water!!! Six inches of fast-flowing water can knock you down. If you must walk through water, stick to non-moving water and use a stick to probe the ground ahead of you. • Do NOT drive into flooded areas or across flooded streets - Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most cars • A foot of water will float most vehicles • Two feet of moving water can sweep your car away

  47. Natural Hazards

  48. Natural Hazards

  49. Natural Hazards • After a flood: • Don’t drink tap water until instructed it is safe to do so • Avoid floodwaters – may be contaminated by raw sewage, gasoline, oil, etc • Be aware of areas where floodwaters may have receded – roads may be weakened • Stay away from downed power lines • Return home when told it is safe to do so • Clean and disinfect anything that got wet – water and mud may contain chemicals, raw sewage, etc.

  50. Natural Hazards • Be aware of the following: • Flood losses are generally NOT covered by your homeowners insurance – you need to check before a flood happens to you • Flood insurance can be obtained through selected insurance agents • There is usually a 30-day waiting period before flood insurance goes into effect