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Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments

Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments

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Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments

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  1. Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments

  2. Michigan’s Goal:To work with partners statewide to support schools as they address childhood weight issues

  3. Alarming Unhealthy Weight Trends (Obese = at or above 95th percentile BMI for age) Ogden C, Flegal K, Carroll M, Johnson C. “Prevalence and Trends in Overweight Among U.S. Children and Adolescents, 1999-20000. “ Journal of the American Medical Association 2002 Vol. 288, no.14, pp.1728-1732

  4. 11% of their calories 15 teaspoons of sugar per day On Average, Adolescents Aged 12-17, Get from Soft Drinks*: *Soft drinks = carbonated beverages, fruit-flavored and part juice drinks, and sports drinks Source: USDA, Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, 1994-96

  5. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  6. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  7. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  8. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  9. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  10. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  11. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  12. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  13. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  14. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  15. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  16. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  17. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  18. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  19. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  20. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

  21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

  23. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24% 25% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

  24. What’s the impact of overweight on the health of our future students?

  25. What’s driving increases in overweight?

  26. Nutrition-Related • Snack calories are increasing • Kids who drink soft drinks consume more calories than kids who don’t drink soft drinks • 1 in 5 MI high school students ate 5 servings of fruits/veggies per day* • 1 in 6 MI high school students drank 3 glasses of milk daily (females less likely than males)* *Michigan Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Weight and Nutrition Fact Sheet, 2003

  27. Physical Activity-Related • 62% 9-13 year olds do not participate in organized physical activity during non-school hours* • 23% of 9-13 year olds don’t engage in any free time physical activity* • Daily participation in physical education class dropped from 42% in 1991 to 25% in 1995MI YRBS 2001 • Screen time is increasing *Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. 2005 Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: The Role of Industry http://www.iom.edu/report.asp?id=22596

  28. Portion Distortion

  29. Student Health Environment Physical Activity Peers Open Campus Availability Nutrition Education • Ala Carte Sales • School Parties • Fundraisers • School Stores • Vending • Boosters • School Board • Athletics • Student Clubs School Meal Program Taste Competition Time to eat Parent Knowledge Role Modeling

  30. Research Shows Positive Health Behaviors May Lead to Increased Student Achievement

  31. School Based Breakfast & Lunch Programs showed... • Increased School Attendance • 8% decline in tardiness • Greater Class Participation • 73% of staff surveyed in the first-year MMFA schools reported an improvement in student attentiveness following the start of the program. Maryland State Department of Education , School and Community Nutrition Programs, Maryland Meals for Achievement (MMFA)

  32. School Based Breakfast & Lunch Programs showed... • Improved Emotional Behaviors • Suspensions were down from an average of 4.4 days per month to 2.8per month • Increased Academic Achievement • MMFA schools saw a five-point increase in students who scored at or above the satisfactory level. • Maryland State Department of Education , School and Community Nutrition Programs, Maryland Meals for Achievement (MMFA)

  33. School Based Physical Activity Programs • Increased concentration • Improved Mathematics, Reading & Writing Scores • Reduced Disruptive Behaviors • Maintenance of Positive Interpersonal Relationships • Reduced Anxiety, Depression & Fatigue “Bridging Student Health Risks and Academic Achievement Through Comprehensive School Health Programs” Journal of School Health, August 1997

  34. Policies One step toward a healthy school environment

  35. Smoking Lessons Learned: Smoking rates began to decline when public health professionals realized the impact of policy and environmental changes. *Broadcast advertising ban *Clean Indoor Air Act *Increase in cigarette taxes

  36. NEW MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES Making Environmental Change Easy • Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs To Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools www.michigan.gov/documents/CSHP_Policy_77375_7.pdf

  37. STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES • Policy on Quality Physical Education www.michigan.gov/documents/HealthPolicyPE_77380_7.pdf

  38. NEW MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES • Policy on Offering Healthy Food and Beverages In Venues Outside of the Federally Regulated Child Nutrition Programs www.michigan.gov/documents/Healthy_Foods_AttchmtA_7.pdf

  39. School’s Role • Ensure: • Dietary Guidelines are met campus-wide • 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity is participated in during the school day • PE and Nutrition curricula are taught • Schools are free of advertising • School policies and practices promoting healthy environment are developed and practiced Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. 2005 Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: The Role of Schools http://www.iom.edu/report.asp?id=22596

  40. Michigan’s Consensus For Addressing Childhood Weight Issues Order or download at: www.emc.cmich.edu/healthyweight/

  41. Overall Philosophy of Recommendations • Healthy Students Of All Shapes And Sizes • The Primary Role Of Schools Is Prevention • Schools Should Go Beyond Prevention Only If Safeguards Are In Place

  42. Respect for Self Healthy Students of All Shapes & Sizes Healthy Eating Physical Activity Respect for Others The Michigan Healthy Weight Concept Model

  43. Consensus Paper Prevention Recommendations • Create A Coordinated School Health Team • Conduct An Assessment • Plan Improvements

  44. Healthy School Action Tool • Combines SHI And CTS • Format Is Simple • Michigan Specific Questions • All State Level Partners Promoting • Launched At Michigan Action For Healthy Kids Coalition Meeting (March 2004)

  45. Healthy School Action Tool

  46. + = www.mihealthtools.org

  47. HSAT • Combines SHI And CTS • Format Is Simple • Michigan Specific Questions • All State Level Partners Promoting • Launched At Michigan Action For Healthy Kids Coalition Meeting • Training for facilitators

  48. Family and Community Involvement Comprehensive School Health Education Physical Education School Health Services Counseling, Psychological, & Social Services School Nutrition Services Healthy School Environment School-site Health Promotion for Staff Components of Coordinated School Health Teams

  49. HSAT Purpose • Create a CSHT • Identify Strengths • Identify Weaknesses • Develop an Action Plan • Make Policy and Environmental Changes