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Introduction to Project Management

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  1. Introduction to Project Management F2 Approach

  2. Course Outline Introductions Project Management Basics Key Terms Project Life Cycle Roles within the project framework Key PM Skills for success

  3. Basics • Definitions: • Project (characteristics-PMBOK*) • A project is finite —having specific start and completion dates—and is undertaken to create a unique product or service which brings about beneficial change or added value. This finite characteristic of projects stands in sharp contrast to processes, which are (semi) permanent functional work to repetitively produce the same product or service. Projects are delivered under certain constraints, traditionally listed as "scope," "time," and "cost.” • Temporary • Unique results • Progressive elaboration

  4. Basics

  5. Basics • Basics • Project vs. Process & Program • Project: Unique goal, requirements, resources and start/end • Defined by project documents (charter, WBS) • Unique goal could be to improve a process! • Process: collection of interrelated tasks, ongoing • Defined by process diagram/documents • Program: Multiple projects and processes • Defined by a mission, projects to be completed and processes to be managed.

  6. Basics Business Process Flow:

  7. Basics • Project Documents: • Charter • Goals and objectives • Deliverable • Scope Definition • Requirements (business and functional) • Communication plan • Resource Identification Document • Work Plan (tasks, dependencies) • Change Management Plan

  8. Basics • Project Documents • Considered the Archives • Processes often have “living” documentation that are updated and live on • Projects often have “living” documents that are ultimately (“mummified”) archived • Work Breakdown Structure • Standard mechanism for breaking down the tasks needed to complete a project

  9. Basics • Project Definitions: • Deliverables • “A measurable, verifiable work product such as a specification, feasibility study report, detailed design document, or working prototype” - PMBOK • Scope • Project scope involves identifying and describing the work that is needed to produce the deliverables of the project in sufficient detail to ensure that: • All the appropriate work is completed • And ONLY the appropriate work is completed

  10. Project Lifecycle PLAN DO CHECK ACT Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure Control (Manage/Monitor/Communicate) • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters) • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training • Implement– do the work defined in plans • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management) • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

  11. Tying in 2 Frameworks • Initiate • Plan • Execute • Monitor and Control • Close PMI Project Management Process:

  12. Tying in 2 Frameworks • PMBOK areas of knowledge • Application area knowledge, standards and regulations • Understanding the PM environment • General management knowledge/skills and interpersonal skills PMI Project Management Framework:

  13. Tying in 2 Frameworks • F2 Quality Improvement Principles

  14. PLAN DO CHECK ACT Fitting Project Management into QI Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure Control (Manage/Monitor/Communicate) New Business Need New Process Process Improvement New Process

  15. Organizational Framework • Business Case Template • Business case required for EIT approval of certain projects • Qualifications? • Mark to fill in

  16. Organizational Framework • Things to consider • Level of approval required: Dept level, Sue, Ann, V’Ella, EIT, etc. • Resources required (staffing, funding, technical resources, etc) • Cross-functional work/Process partners involved (FM wide, university wide) • Does it support a Strategic Initiative • Is it measurable (not always a requirement)

  17. Organizational Framework • Identifying projects • How are projects identified in your department? • How are projects approved? • How do they align with the F2, FM overall strategy? Do you consider alignment with the Strategy Map? • Proposing projects • What do you do when you have an idea for a project?

  18. Key Terms • Project Components • Charter • Goals and objectives • Deliverable • Scope Definition • Requirements (business and functional) • Communication plan • Resource Identification • Work Plan (tasks, dependencies) • Change Control • Commonly used terms • Bandwidth • Vet • Scope creep • Metrics

  19. Key Terms (cont.) • People • Sponsors, Executive Sponsors • Stakeholders • PM Tools and activities • Risk Assessment (planning) • Flow Chart • Process Flow • Business process re-engineering • Process map • WBS (planning) • Timeline/Milestones (planning) • Triple Constraint/Resource Triangle (planning) • Other • SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely)

  20. Roles in the project framework • Sponsor/Executive Sponsor • Project Manager • Operational Staff: • Adviser/Subject Experts/Business Analyst • Operational Manager • Facilitator • Team Leader • Team/Member

  21. PLAN DO CHECK ACT Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure

  22. PLAN DO CHECK ACT Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure

  23. PLAN DO CHECK ACT Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure

  24. PLAN DO CHECK ACT Project Lifecycle Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure

  25. Roles in the project framework • Roles & Responsibilities Template: • https://wiki.cac.washington.edu/display/pmportal/Project+Roles+and+Responsibilities+Template

  26. Decision Making Structure • Organizes how decisions are made • Complex projects need decision making structures as they tend to be cross-organizational and non-hierarchical • Supports making decisions that may affect other parts of the organization (i.e. technical impacts vs. business impacts) • Supports issue escalation

  27. Executive Sponsor – V ’ Ella Warren Sponsor – Ann Anderson Business Steward – Karen Long Lisa Yeager, Erick Winger, Bill Shirey, Gary Prohaska, Heriberto Rodriguez, Jan Sullivan Business Advisory Group SIO Coach/Mentor Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner, Pat Bonner Sara Gomez, Karen Long, Jeanne Marie Isola , Jan Sullivan, Erick Winger Project Manager Erick Winger Technical Project eTravel Process Manager Improvement Team Jan Sullivan eTravel Customer Support Team Application Developers Rebecca Tseng Heriberto Rodriguez HERITAGE eTravel Project Example Executive Sponsor Executive Sponsor – – V V ’ ’ Ella Ella Warren Warren Sponsor Sponsor – – Ann Anderson Ann Anderson Business Steward Business Steward – – Karen Long Karen Long Technical Advisory Technical Advisory Business Advisory Business Advisory Group Group Group Group Strategic Initiative Office Leadership SIO Coach/Mentor Pat Bonner, Jelena Curless , Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner, Ann Anderson, Lisa Yeager, Pat Bonner Jeanne Marie Isola , Gary Prohaska Sara Gomez, Karen Long, Bill Shirey, Karen Long, Heriberto Rodriguez, Paul Schurr , Jeanne Marie Isola , Jan Sullivan, Heriberto Rodriguez , Jan Sullivan, Bill Shirey , Jan Sullivan, Erick Winger Erick Winger, Cindy Gregovich David Wright, Gary Prohaska Erick Winger Project Manager Project Manager Erick Winger Erick Winger Technical Project Technical Project eTravel eTravel Process Process Manager Manager Improvement Team Improvement Team Jan Sullivan eTravel eTravel Customer Customer Support Team Support Team INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Application Application Developers Developers ARIBA HERITAGE Rebecca Tseng Heriberto Rodriguez SYSTEMS Heriberto Rodriguez HERITAGE

  28. Process Improvement Team e.g., Global Emergency Mgmt Website/portal Development Single Point of Contact • Global Support Project Example Executive Sponsors Provost Senior Vice President, Finance and Facilities Project Sponsors Executive Vice Provost Vice Provosts for: Research, Student Life, Global Affairs, Undergrad Academic Affairs, Grad School Project Advisors Attorney General’s Office Environmental Health & Safety Internal Audit Risk Management Core Steering Team • Senior staff from key admin support depts. • Senior school & college administrators • Provost’s Office Faculty Consulting Team Faculty active in global research & education Rapid Response

  29. UW Climate Action Plan Team Example

  30. Exercise • Your table will be assigned a project – read through the description and be prepared to report back the following items for discussion • Identify the appropriate individual (may be shared) for the following roles. If there is not a specific person, who might you talk to in order to determine who should fill the role: • Project Manager • Operational Manager • Facilitator • Team Leader • Team/Member • Business Analyst • Determine where this project fits into the FM Strategy Map • Create a preliminary list of resources you will need to carry out this project

  31. F2 Strategy Map

  32. Science and Art of Project Management

  33. PM Skills: Key to success Planning (I – P) Communication (I – P – I– C) Resource Management (I – C) Team Management (P – I – C) Scope Management (I – P – I ) Schedule Management (P – I)

  34. PM Skills: Key to success in FM Compare to PMBOK core skill areas

  35. Why is Planning so Important? • Six most common reasons for project failure: • Lack of user involvement (planning, communications, team management) • Long or unrealistic time scales (planning) • No or poor requirements (IT projects) • Scope creep (scope management) • No or weak change control system (scope management) • Poor Testing (IT projects) -Coley Consulting

  36. Planning Skills Planning & the Project Lifecycle Core planning skills Success factors Planning tools Case study

  37. Project Lifecycle: Planning Skills PLAN DO CHECK ACT Initiator/ Stakeholder New Team/ Owner Project Team Organizational Framework Define Work Project Work Report Integrate Initiate Plan Implement Close Project closure Control (Manage/Monitor/Communicate) • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters) • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training • Implement– do the work defined in plans • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management) • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

  38. Planning Responsibility • Whose job is it? • Project Manager has primary responsibility • PM may choose to delegate planning responsibilities of lower level tasks/groups of tasks, particularly with larger projects • The project manager should manage the project plan at the highest level even if lower level planning is delegated.

  39. Core Planning Skills • Create clear action plans • WBS: Start with major activities. Determine steps required to complete major activities. • Estimation techniques vary: (consider type of work, past experience, SME input, etc.) • Create measurable & identifiable milestones • Measurable: Be able to determine reasonably how much progress has been made, WBS major activities as base. • Consider phasing of projects • Identify & communicate with stakeholders and affected user groups • Supports communications plan, team management

  40. Planning: Success Factors • Identify resources, goals and timeline (Resource Triangle) • Affected by staff availability, other projects, stakeholders determination of goals. • Identify & communicate with stakeholders and affected user groups • Develop Communications plan (next section) • Use QI tools • Charters; Measures; Checklists; Decision models

  41. Identify resources, goals and timeline • Operational Staff • Volunteer effort • Funds • Deadlines • Milestones Time Resources (cost) Scope/Quality • Degree of user involvement • Deliverables • Scope • Approach

  42. Risk Management Risk Management – Identify and manage risks to meeting Time/Scope/Resource needs and expectations Facilitates mitigation plans, scope definition and key business decisions

  43. Example: Direct Deposit for travel system • ½ time PM, in addition to current duties • Existing subject matter experts of 5 • No new funds • July 08 – June 09 • User focus groups – done by Sept 08 • User Testing Jan 09 Time Resources Scope/Quality • User task group of 12 campus representatives • Direct deposit capability for travel reimbursement payments • Users to validate all user interfaces and training programs

  44. Identify resources, goals and timeline • Tool – Resource Triangle • Resource Triangle ties three elements that are dependent upon each other • Time – timeline, milestones • Resources – people, funds, technical support • Quality – includes scope, deliverables, approach to execution • Helps you set and communicate expectations • Helps you manage scope • Important to get sponsor understanding and sign-off

  45. Communicate with stakeholders • Identify & communicate with stakeholders and affected user groups • Set expectations of your users and stakeholders • Set the stage for your communications plan • This is where organizational savvy is key (subject experts, operational staff) • Keys to operating in our decentralized organization • Understanding the UW and your users

  46. Communicate with stakeholders • Key Business Decision Log • Document key decisions as they are made • Provides historical record • “Does anyone remember what we decided..” • Mechanism for validating decisions • PM Portal: https://wiki.cac.washington.edu/display/pmportal/Issue+Action+Decision+Log • Sharepoint

  47. Communicate with stakeholders • Issues Log • Document major issues that may affect the project • Feeds the Key Decision Log • PM Portal • Sharepoint

  48. Planning Tools Resource Triangle Stakeholder identification Project Charter (PM Portal, Strategy Management (Jeanne), other) PM effort matrix High Level Risk Management Plan Basic WBS templates (PM Portal, Wiki, other) Project Plan Checklist & Template (PM Portal) Project Roles and Responsibilities Template (PM Portal) Key Decision Log Issues Log Many more…

  49. Planning Exercise • Continue building on the assigned project your group was assigned • Write a goal statement for this project along with a list of key deliverables. • Describe any constraints on this project that will effect budget, quality, schedule, resources or scope. • Create a list of the key stakeholders for this project. • Identify the key information related to each side of the resource triangle. Identify: • Key resources • Key Time elements: milestones, deadlines • Quality: Possible scope definition, user involvement or approach details • Name one area of risk within each side of your resource triangle. What is the risk? Insert each risk into your high level risk management plan.

  50. Communication in Project Management • Communication in the Project Management Life Cycle • Communication Tools • Communication Plan Development • Communication skills • Case Study