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Science Leaders Dialogue COACHES

Science Leaders Dialogue COACHES

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Science Leaders Dialogue COACHES

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  1. Science Leaders DialogueCOACHES Session 5 Coaching Continuum Self Reflection and Student Engagement Presented by Dr. Ava D. Rosales, Instructional Supervisor Heriberto “Eddie” Bonet, Curriculum Support Specialist Miami-Dade County Public Schools Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs

  2. Welcome Make a Name Tent and include: NAME SCHOOL One “aha” (eye-opening) moment that resulted from the Interim and Quarterly assessments

  3. Source: Wordle.net

  4. Outcomes/Goals Support coaching continuum to improve teaching and learning: • Model acquisition of scientific literacy • Facilitate self-discovery processes • Develop activities that differentiate instruction M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs

  5. Collaborative • Ownership into action • Actively participate • Consensus building • Helpful Norms • Electronic devices • Restrooms

  6. An Instructional Coach Serves • as a professional development liaison within the school to support, model, and continuously improve the instructional programs to assure academic improvement for ALL students. • as a stable resource at the school site to support high quality implementation of research-based instruction. • as a mentor in developing ideal content-rich classrooms

  7. A Coaching Continuum -reminder • Coaching duties take many forms including: • Facilitating Workshops           • Providing Demonstration Lessons; Co-teaching; Observing, Conferencing, and Debriefing                  • Facilitating “teacher self-discovery” The constant in all of these activities is that they lead to better instructional practices and higher student achievement…

  8. Coaching Continuum Confer, observe, and debrief to improve instruction and student achievement Facilitate a workshop or session to improve instruction and student achievement Provide an observation lesson to improve instruction and student achievement with feedback and collaborative input Co-teach with colleague to improve instruction and student achievement based on mutually agreed upon learning goals and success indicators Facilitate action research to seek resources after reflection to improve instruction and student achievement Facilitate a study group to investigate common interest topics to improve instruction and student achievement Highly directive… Highly reflective…

  9. Idea #8: Know What Science IS and What Science IS NOT… http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/lessons/sunsets.html ENSI

  10. WHAT SCIENCE IS…

  11. Science IS • LIMITED TO THE NATURAL WORLD • OBSERVABLE TESTABLE • MEASURABLE REPEATABLE • MODIFIABLE VERIFIABLE • BUILT UPON TESTABLE PREDICTIONS • BASED ON EXPERIMENTATION • OPEN TO CHANGE BIASED • DISPROVABLE OBJECTIVE • STRONG THEORIES INFERRED FROM SOLID EVIDENCE • MADE STRONGER BY DIFFERENT LINES OF EVIDENCE • A SEARCH FOR UNDERSTANDING

  12. WHAT SCIENCE IS NOT….

  13. Science IS NOT… • BASED ON PROOF (Do not use this word!) • RIGID • BASED ON BELIEF (Do not use this word either!) • BASED ON FAITH • BASED ON AUTHORITY • DECIDED BY DEBATE OR LAW • A SEARCH FOR TRUTH • CERTAIN (These either!) • FAIR • ABLE TO SOLVE ALL PROBLEMS • A COLLECTION OF FACTS • DEMOCRATIC • ABSOLUTE

  14. What is Inquiry Learning Anyway? Inquiry involves answering questions about the world in which we live. Inquiry means more than constructing laboratory experiments or hands-on activities. Dorothy Gabel, Educational HORIZONS, Winter 2003

  15. What is Inquiry Learning Anyway? • Learning should be based around student questions. • Students work independently to solve problems rather than receiving direct instructions from the teacher. • Teachers are viewed as facilitators of learning rather than vessels of knowledge. • The teacher's job in an inquiry learning environment is not to provide knowledge, but to help students discover knowledge themselves.

  16. Scientific Inquiry • Ask a question about objects, organisms and events in the environment. • Plan and conduct a simple investigation. • Use appropriate tools and techniques to gather and interpret data. • Use evidence and scientific knowledge to develop explanations. • Communicate investigations, data and explanations to others. National Research Council, 1996 http://www.nap.edu/html/nses/

  17. Essential Features of Classroom Inquiry When learning science through inquiry, learners: • Are engaged by scientific questions • Give priority to evidence as they plan and conduct investigations • Develop descriptions, explanations, and predictions using collected evidence • Engage in critical discourse with others about procedures, evidence and explanations Carin, A.A., J.E. Bass & T.L. Content, 2005. Methods for Teaching Science as Inquiry. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

  18. Three Levels of Inquiry • Structured or Bounded • Students engage in a hands-on activity and draw conclusions, but follow specific teacher instructions. • Guided or Directed • Students may assume responsibility for determining procedure, but the teacher chooses question for investigation. • Open or Free • Students generate their own questions from a teacher-selected topic and design their own investigation.

  19. Inquiry or Not Activity

  20. Jigsaw NSTA Article Fostering Argumentation

  21. Positive Learning EnvironmentScience Grades 6 - 8 A grant funded by the USDOE and awarded by the FLDOE Mathematics and Science Partnership Initiative. Presentation developed by Florida PROMiSE Partnership to Rejuvenate and Optimize Mathematics and Science Education

  22. A Positive Learning Environment The learning environment plays a significant role in what students learn. A positive learning environment is one that promotes, not hinders, scientific literacy.

  23. The Learning Environment More than just a physical setting with desks, bulletin boards, and posters, the classroom and science lab environments communicate subtle messages about what is valued in learning and doing science.

  24. The Learning Environment If students are to learn to make conjectures, experiment with various approaches to solving problems, construct scientific arguments and respond to others’ arguments, then creating an environment that fosters these kinds of activities is essential.

  25. The Equity Principle Excellence in science education requires equity—high expectations and strong support for ALLstudents. American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 http://www.aaas.org/

  26. The Equity Principle Equity requires: • high expectations and worthwhile opportunities for all. • accommodating differences to help everyonelearn. • resources and support for all classrooms, all laboratories and all students.

  27. EQUITY In each corner is a sign— strongly agree, agree, disagree, and strongly disagree. I am going to put a statement on the board that adds a caveat to the statement “ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN.” The caveat is often used to explain why all students don’t learn. Making Schools Work for Every Child, SERVE , 2000

  28. EQUITY Go to the sign that best reflects your belief about the statement. Briefly discuss why you are there. Choose a spokesperson to share with the whole group. You may change corners at any time.

  29. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… BUT THE EXTENT OF THEIR LEARNING IS DETERMINED BY THEIR INNATE ABILITY OR APTITUDE.

  30. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… IF THEY ELECT TO PUT FORTH THE NECESSARY EFFORT.

  31. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… AND WE WILL ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR ENSURING THEIR GROWTH, BUT MUCH IS BEYOND OUR CONTROL.

  32. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… AND WE WILL ESTABLISH HIGH STANDARDS OF LEARNING THAT WE WILL EXPECT ALL STUDENTS TO ACHIEVE.

  33. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… BUT THE EXTENT OF THEIR LEARNING IS DETERMINED BY THEIR INNATE ABILITY OR APTITUDE. “We believe that all students can learn, but the extent of their learning is determined by their innate ability or aptitude. This aptitude is relatively fixed, and, as teachers, we have little influence over the extent of student learning. It is our job to create multiple programs or tracks that address the different abilities of students and then guide students to the appropriate program. This ensures that students have access to the proper curriculum and an optimum opportunity to master material appropriate to their ability.”

  34. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN… IF THEY ELECT TO PUT FORTH THE NECESSARY EFFORT. “We believe that all students can learn if they elect to put forth the effort. It is our job to provide all students with this opportunity to learn, and we fulfill our responsibility when we try to present lessons that are both clear and engaging. In the final analysis, however, while it is our job to teach, it is the student’s job to learn. We should invite students to learn, but honor their decision if they elect not to do so.”

  35. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN…AND WE WILL ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR ENSURING THEIR GROWTH, BUT MUCH IS BEYOND OUR CONTROL. “We believe that all students can learn and that it is our responsibility to help each student demonstrate growth as a result of his or her experience with us. The extent of the growth will be determined by a combination of the student’s innate ability and effort. It is our job to encourage all students to learn as much as possible, but the extent of their learning is dependent on factors over which we have no control.”

  36. EQUITY ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN…AND WE WILL ESTABLISH HIGH STANDARDS OF LEARNING THAT WE WILL EXPECT ALL STUDENTS TO ACHIEVE. “We believe that all students can and must learn at relatively high levels of achievement. It is our job to create an environment in our classrooms that results in this high level of performance. We are confident that with our support and help, students can master challenging academic material, and we expect them to do so. We are prepared to work collaboratively with colleagues, students, and parents to achieve this shared educational purpose.”

  37. A Supportive Learning Environment Effective teaching requires a challenging and supportive classroom learning environment.

  38. A Supportive Learning Environment • Students should gain confidence through successful experiences in science promoting life-long learning. • Teachers should believe allstudents can successfully learn science. • All students should receive equitable treatment without regard to gender, ethnicity, or predetermined expectations for success. • Learning styles should be accommodated through a variety of instructional methods.

  39. A Supportive Learning Environment Children are NEVER what you think they are Children are NEVER what they think they are Children ALMOST ALWAYS become what they think you think they are. Dudley Flood, North Carolina

  40. An Enabling Learning Environment An enabling environment is one in which teachers stimulate the learning of good science by: • Providing and structuring time necessary to explore; • Respecting and valuing students' ideas and ways of thinking • Expecting students to actively participate as an integral part of the learning process • Having available the materials (manipulatives, technological tools, lab equipment) necessary to explore science

  41. A Physical Learning Environment • Furnishings should include tables and chairs or flat desks that can be arranged and rearranged. • No single resource, including textbooks, should be the sole supporter of any science program. • Manipulatives should be used to meet the needs of ALLstudents. • Students should be encouraged to spend the time and use the tools needed for scientific exploration and discovery.

  42. A Physical Learning Environment The learning environment is not restricted to classrooms. Many activities may require students to be outdoors

  43. Classroom Organization Map Your Room For A Purpose • Seating arrangements • Learning centers • Individual or groups • Instructional Space • A/V and technology equipment/materials • Placement of demonstration tables/cart, reagent tables, counter tops

  44. Physical Environment Comfortable Learning Environment • Display areas that are interactive • Student Work • Learning Center • Student created and commercially produced posters • Current events in science • Science Vocabulary • graphic organizers, word walls • Science Library

  45. Physical Environments: Laboratories • Lab Safety posters and safety equipment signs visible • Appropriate and effective use when space is shared • Accessible safety and emergency equipment that is in working order • Considerations of storage of materials and chemicals

  46. CommunicationReading, Writing, Speaking, Listening Establish a communication-rich classroom in which students are encouraged to share their ideas and to seek clarification until they understand. National Research Council, 2000

  47. Reading the Language of Science • Making sense of scientific terms, symbols, notations, and syntax • Interpreting pictures, diagrams, charts, and graphs • Discerning differences between the meaning of a word in a science context and when used as part of everyday language (e.g., the word theory) • Integrating different modes of communication (e.g., the written text to the spoken text; data analysis to discussion of results)

  48. Reading the Language of Science Activity On your worksheet, review the prefixes and meanings sheet. In your group, decipher the words on the second page.

  49. Reading the Language of Science Science writing is aimed at being: Concise Clear Precise What are some issues related to potential sources of difficulty for understanding science vocabulary.

  50. Writing in Science The process of writing … reveals when understanding is robust or fragile. Thompson, Kersaint, Richards, Hunsader, Rubenstein, Mathematical Literacy: Helping Students Make Meaning in the Middle Grades (2008)