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hazard posed by radon gas in utah n.
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Hazard Posed by Radon Gas in Utah PowerPoint Presentation
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Hazard Posed by Radon Gas in Utah

Hazard Posed by Radon Gas in Utah

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Hazard Posed by Radon Gas in Utah

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  1. Radon is: • A radioactive Gas • Odorless, colorless, and tasteless • The second leading cause of lung and bronchus cancer • Radon gas is a killer • Radon levels: • The level or radon in outside air is 0.4 pCi/L • The average indoor level is 1.3 pCiL • Mitigation should occur when levels exceed 2 pCi/L • Smoking plus radon levels over 2 pCi/L magnify your risk of cancer several fold (4 times greater than dying from poison) • (figures from Centers for Disease Control, CDC.gov) • Radon gas comes from; • The natural radioactive decay of Uranium and other heavy elements (such as Vanadium) in the soil • Radon is found everywhere in the United States • You get exposed to radon daily, but in concentrations that are well below dangerous (but not risk free) levels – except at home, work, or in any building • Radon enters into our living and work spaces: • Through cracks in the foundation • Around plumbing and electrical lines • Through water when wells contain high levels of radon gas • Measuring Radon: • Radon is measured in picoCurries per liter of air (pCi/L) • There are a two test types, short term and long term • Short term tests are less definitive and run from a few days to a few months. • Long term tests are more definitive and take 6 months or more Hazard Posed by Radon Gas in Utah • 2 Most Important Things About Radon Gas: • THERE ARE NO “SAFE” LEVELS in the home or workplace. • YOU SHOULD TEST FOR RADON EPA.gov Radon and Lung Cancer in Utah Where the Risk is Greatest • For More Information: • Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Radiation Control, http://www.radon.utah.gov/ • Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.epa.gov/radon/index.html Sources: US Environmental Protection Agency. (2013, January 10). A citizen's guide to radon. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/citguide.html Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Radiation Control. (2013, October 13). Radon program: Frequently asked questions. Retrieved from http://www.radon.utah.gov/radonfaqs.htm Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Radiation Control. (2013, July 10). Short term radon test results by county and zip code. Retrieved from http://www.radon.utah.gov/docs/2013/Mar/RadonShortTerm2013version3.pdf Created by Steven Lizottehttp://stevenlizotte.wordpress.com December 2, 2013