Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
TOWN OF TOLLAND PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
TOWN OF TOLLAND

TOWN OF TOLLAND

146 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

TOWN OF TOLLAND

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. TOWN OF TOLLAND FY 2012 - 2013 through 2016 - 2017 Town Manager’s Five Year Capital Plan February 23, 2012

  2. CAPITAL BUDGET Everything the Town does, from providing services to its residents and citizens, to equipping employees to effectively perform their jobs, requires the existence of certain basic physical assets. Assets include: • Streets • Parks • Buildings • School Facilities • Large Equipment • Technology Assets must be purchased, maintained and replaced on a timely basis or their usefulness in providing public services will diminish. The Town’s Five Year Capital Improvement Program is developed to ensure adequate capital investment in the Town’s assets and to provide an orderly method for funding these assets.

  3. WHAT IS A CAPITAL ITEM? Definition of Capital Projects: Any project, to be included in the Town’s Capital Improvement Program, should fall into one of the following three program categories: 1. Any new or expanded physical facility, including preliminary design and related professional services. 2. Land or property acquisition. 3. Items of a non-recurring nature where the benefits are realized over a long period of time. A project should also exhibit the following characteristics to be included in the Capital Improvement Program: 1. Life Expectancy: The project’s outcome, non-recurring in nature, should have a useful life of greater than eight years. 2. Cost: Cost should be a relatively high, non-operative expenditure for the Town; generally in excess of $10,000 for equipment or plant facility improvements.

  4. CAPITAL BUDGET PLANNING PROCESS

  5. Revisions To Capital Budget After Submission by Town Manager to Town Council on December 21, 2011 • Reduced the General Fund portion of the Capital Budget by $86,014 with the result being the replacement of the skylight at the Intermediate School and the purchase of additional security cameras at various schools are being moved to the second year of the plan or possibly being done with other revenue sources and a used generator shall be purchased at the Senior Center rather than a new one.

  6. TYPES OF FUNDING METHODS • General Fund Contributions • Capital Non-Recurring Fund • Non-Referendum Notes • Local Capital Improvement Plan Grant (State) • Town Aid to Road Grant (State) • State School Construction Grants and other State Grants • Ambulance Fees • Cemetery Funds • Referendum Borrowing • Unallocated Capital • Hicks Trust

  7. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY THE GENERAL FUNDTotal Amount: $231,877 Town Administration: • Reserve for current year depreciation for municipal vehicle replacement - $27,877. Vehicles scheduled to be replaced are Building Inspector’s Jeep and the Highway pick-up truck. Board of Education: • Replacement of 1998 GMC ½ ton pick-up with 2012 ½ ton pick-up - $25,000.

  8. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY THE GENERAL FUNDTotal Amount: $231,877 Capital Equipment: • Dump Truck #28 Replacement – Replace 1997 Ford truck which is a front-line vehicle. Truck includes plow and sander - $145,000 Streets & Roads: • Drainage Design priority is the paved portion of Johnson Road (1,300 feet of road) including design of catch basins - $25,000

  9. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY OTHER SOURCES Board of Education:Tolland Intermediate School: • Removal and Replacement of Asbestos Floor Tile - $414,000 • Driveway and Parking Lot Paving - $130,000 • (Non-referendum notes) Tolland Middle School: • Track Resurfacing - $115,000 (Non-referendum notes) Tolland High School: • Lights for stadium field - $300,000 Town to be reimbursed through private donations (Non-referendum notes)

  10. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY OTHER SOURCES Capital Equipment: • Replacement of 1992 Dodge Ram Utility Body Dump Truck with Versa Lift - $57,000 (CNRE $44,000 and General Fund $13,000) • Fire and Ambulance: • Service 140- $85,000 (Ambulance Fees) • Emergency Back-up Power Generators - $140,000 (Ambulance Fees)

  11. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY OTHER SOURCES • Parks & Recreation: • Cross Farms Building with Bathrooms, Concession • and Storage Area - $449,734(State Grant and Existing Funds) Public Facilities: • Hicks Building Roof – Level 2 - $106,000 (Existing funds HVAC $100,000 and Senior Housing Project $6,000) • Study for Improvements for Library & Public Works- $30,000 (Non-referendum notes)

  12. FY12-13: SIGNIFICANT CAPITAL PROJECTSFUNDED BY OTHER SOURCES Streets & Roads: Construction and Reconstruction: • Miscellaneous drainage construction including culverts - $148,600 (Non-referendum notes) and $50,000 (LOCIP) Pavement Management: • Road Maintenance - $230,000 (Non-referendum notes), $250,000 (TAR) and $70,000 (LOCIP) for a total of $550,000 • Parking Lot Paving - $100,000 (Non-referendum notes) • Neighborhood Roads - $100,000 (Non-referendum notes)

  13. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 2: • Town Administration: • Tolland Green Rte. 195 & 74 Corridor Improvements - $250,000 • (Grant $225,000 and General Fund $25,000) • Board of Education: • Tolland Intermediate School: • Gym Door Removal - $54,000 • (General Fund) • Skylight Replacement - $18,000 • (General Fund) • Tolland Middle School : • Gym Door Removal -$60,000 • (General Fund)

  14. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 2, continued: • District Wide: • Camera Upgrade and Base Equipment - $35,000 • (General Fund $23,014 and other sources $11,986) Capital Equipment: Highway: • Replacement of Dump Truck #6 – 2000 Freightliner - $147,000 (Non-referendum notes) • Fire and Ambulance: • Fire Gear - $25,000 (Ambulance Fees)

  15. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 2, continued: • Parks & Recreation: • Renovations at Parker School - $40,000 • (CNRE Fund) • Public Facilities: • Station 140 Roof - $30,000 • (General Fund) • Streets & Road: • Drainage Infrastructure • Johnson Road - $276,300 and Torry Road - $175,000 • (Non-referendum notes)

  16. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 2, continued: Pavement Management: • $750,000 to address road maintenance, parking lot and neighborhood roads according to automated pavement management system recommendations($480,000 – Non-referendum notes, $120,000 – LOCIP and$150,000 - TAR)

  17. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 3: Board of Education: Parker Memorial School: • Roof Replacement - $575,300 (Non-referendum notes)• Boiler - $625,000 (Non-referendum notes) Capital Equipment: Highway: • Replacement of Mower #2 (16’ cut) - $80,000(General Fund)

  18. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 3, continued: Fire & Ambulance: • Ambulance 640 Replacement – $246,238 (Ambulance Fees) • Portable Diesel Generator – $40,000 (Ambulance Fees) • Public Facilities: • Hicks Roof Levels 4 and 6 - $125,000 (General Fund)

  19. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 3, continued: • Streets and Roads: • Johnson Road Reconstruction - $276,300 • (Non-referendum notes) • Townwide Drainage Infrastructure - $75,000 • (Non-referendum notes) • Pavement Management: • $750,000 to address road maintenance, parking lot and neighborhood roads according to automated pavement management system recommendations. ($480,000 – Non-referendum notes, $120,000 – LOCIP and $150,000 - TAR)

  20. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 4: • Town Administration: • Tolland Green Rte. 195 & 74 Corridor • (Non-referendum Notes $250,000 and Grants $2,550,000) • Board of Education: • Birch Grove Primary School • Parking Lot Paving - $100,000 • (Non-referendum Notes) • Capital Equipment: • Replacement of 2002 CAT Backhoe - $120,000 • (Non-referendum Notes) • Replacement of CAT Bucket Loader #16 - $169,000 • (General Fund)

  21. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources Year 4, continued: • Fire: • Replacement of Rescue 240 - $625,000 • (Ambulance Fees) • Streets and Roads: • Drainage Construction - various - $50,000 • (General Fund) • Pavement Management: • $750,000 to address road maintenance, parking lot and neighborhood roads according to automated pavement management system recommendations. • ($480,000 – Non-referendum notes, $120,000 – LOCIP and $150,000 – TAR)

  22. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources: Year 5: • Board of Education: • Birch Grove Primary: • Parking lot paving phase 2 - $100,000 • (Non-referendum Notes) • Tolland High School: • Track resurfacing - $70,000 • (General Fund) • Capital Equipment: • Replacement of Dump Truck #32 - $155,000 • (Non-referendum Notes)

  23. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources: Year 5, continued: • Capital Equipment Continued: • Replacement of 2003 11’ Toro 4000 Mower - $53,000 • (General Fund) • Fire and Ambulance: • Contribution to Emergency Service Equipment Reserve - $150,000 • (Ambulance Fees)

  24. Significant Projects in Years 2-5 By All Sources: Year 5, continued: • Parks & Recreation: • Basketball Court at Heron Cove - $39,600 • (General Fund) • Streets & Roads: • $750,000 to address road maintenance, parking lot and neighborhood roads according to automated pavement management system recommendations. • ($480,000 – Non-referendum Notes, $120,000 – LOCIP and $150,000 - TAR)

  25. DRAINAGE CONCERNS • Drainage Infrastructure • Culvert Repair and Rehabilitation. • Culvert failure can result in sinkholes, flooding and roadway damage. Additional concerns related to culvert failures include costs associated with emergency repair work, damage to neighboring properties and motorists delays. • The Capital Budget is designed so that construction follows engineering design by 1 year. • Culverts have been prioritized based on their existing condition and history of flooding.

  26. DRAINAGE CONCERNSContinued • Stormwater Management Repair and Rehabilitation • Several stormwater management structures require repair and/or reconstruction. These structures include detention basins, stormwater level spreaders and bio-retention areas. • Structures that have been poorly maintained, designed inadequately or have not been constructed appropriately are subject to erosion and sedimentation, resulting in deterioration and damage to adjacent properties and pollution of nearby streams and inland wetlands. • Additional drainage concerns focus on localized puddling in low areas of roadways. During excessive periods of rain or thaw/freeze cycles, these areas present a danger to pedestrians and motorists.

  27. PAST 5 YEAR GENERAL FUNDCAPITAL CONTRIBUTIONS FY08 - $462,859 or 1.1% of Townwide Operating Budget FY09 - $506,037 or 1.1% of Townwide Operating Budget FY10 - $204,650 or .42% of Townwide Operating Budget FY11 - $266,700 or .54% of Townwide Operating Budget FY12 - $305,708 or .60% of Townwide Operating Budget FY13- $231,310 or .45% of Townwide Operating Budget Town Manager Proposed FY12 = $231,310 or 0.45% of Townwide Operating Budget

  28. FY12-13 CAPITAL PLAN BY PROGRAM AREA

  29. We Must Protect Our Investment in Our Infrastructure Miles of paved local roads: 123.25 Miles of unpaved local roads: 8.85 Total miles of road = 132.10 To construct 1 mile of road = $1 million dollars $132,100,000 132.10 miles x $1,000,000 = ●The investment we must protect ●

  30. Update: February, 2012Presented by Gordon Daring of VHB, Inc. Town of Tolland, CT Pavement Management Study

  31. Presentation Overview • Pavement Management Concepts • Pavement Management in Tolland • Current Conditions & Backlog • Budget Analysis • Updated 5 Year CIP

  32. Pavement Management Concepts What is Pavement Management? Otherwise known as “Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Buck” • The practice of planning for pavement maintenance and rehabilitation with the goal of maximizing the value and life of a pavement network.

  33. Pavement Management Concepts The Process • Pavement Section Inventory • Pavement distress identification and quantification • (Updated on a four year cycle) • Pavement Condition Index (PCI) calculation on a 0 - 100 scale • Define Repair Strategies and Costs • Test various Budget Scenarios • Develop list of candidate projects • Apply engineering and local judgment to define annual road program

  34. Pavement Management Concepts Pavement Deterioration Curve Will cost $10.00 to $13.00 Here

  35. Pavement Management Concepts Do Nothing Condition (PCI 91-100) PCI = 99

  36. Routine Maintenance Condition (PCI 83-90) Pavement Management Concepts Treatment options – Crack sealing, patching PCI = 86

  37. Preventive Maintenance Condition (PCI 71-82) Pavement Management Concepts Treatment options – Crack sealing, chip seal, thin overlay PCI = 73

  38. Structural Improvement Condition (PCI 56-70) Pavement Management Concepts Treatment options – Overlay, Mill & Overlay, Cold in Place Recycling PCI = 65

  39. Base Rehabilitation Condition (PCI 0-55) Pavement Management Concepts Treatment options – Reclamation, Reconstruction PCI = 43

  40. Pavement Management in Tolland Average Pavement Condition Index = 71* * Estimated, February, 2012, based on computer projection

  41. Pavement Management in Tolland PCI Distribution Trend

  42. Pavement Management in Tolland * Paved Roadways only Current Backlog Summary* (Feb, 2012)

  43. Pavement Management in Tolland Funding Scenario Comparison • The effects of funding scenarios at $500k and $1.2M over 5 years as well as the planned levels listed below were evaluated. • FY2013 - $650k • FY2014 - $850k • FY2015 - $750k • FY2016 - $750k • FY2017 - $750k • The analysis did not include parking lot, drainage, or gravel road needs

  44. Pavement Management in Tolland Future Pavement Condition Projections Given the trend of poorer road conditions over the last three years, the planned increase in funding is wise.

  45. Development of Annual Road Program Process • Determine effective funding levels • System recommends roads of highest benefit to the Town based on: • High Traffic Volume • Lower Repair Cost • Longer Repair Life Expectancy • Poorer Road Conditions • Engineering judgment is used to adjust the program to reflect coordination with other projects, neighborhood programs, mobilization efficiencies, etc.

  46. Development of Annual Road Program Strategy • Focus primarily on most heavily travelled roads until those roads have reached acceptable condition • Reserve a portion of budget to address some local residential roads • Coordinate work on residential roads within neighborhoods • Use full range of pavement treatment options