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Chemistry Chapter 28

Chemistry Chapter 28

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Chemistry Chapter 28

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  1. Chemistry Chapter 28

  2. Section 28.1 Nuclear Radiation Objectives: • Discuss the processes of radioactivity and radioactive decay • Characterize alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of composition and penetrating power

  3. Radioactivity • Reactions in which the nuclei of unstable isotopes, called radioisotopes, gain stability by undergoing changes. • Unlike chemical reactions, nuclear reactions are not affected by changes in temperature, pressure, or the presence of catalysts. • They are also unaffected by the compounds in which the unstable isotopes are present, and they cannot be slowed down, speeded up, or turned off.

  4. Radioactivity In 1896, French chemist Antoine Henri Becquerel made an interesting accidental discovery. He was studying the ability of uranium salts that had been exposed to sunlight to fog photographic film plate. During a period of bad weather, Becquerel realized that even uranium salts not exposed to the sun caused the same result in the film. This was a form of “invisible energy.”

  5. Radioactivity Two of Becquerel’s associates were Marie Curie and Pierre Curie. Marie named this “invisible energy” radioactivity. The penetrating rays and particles emitted by a radioactive source are called radiation.

  6. Radioactivity • A radioactive atom, or radioisotope, undergoes drastic changes as it emits radiation. • An unstable nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation during the process of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is spontaneous and does not require any input of energy.

  7. Types of Radiation Several types of radiation can be emitted during radioactive decay. The different types of radiation from a radioactive source can be separated by an electric or magnetic field.

  8. Types of Radiation Alpha Radiation – consists of helium nuclei that have been emitted from a radioactive source. These emitted particles, called alpha particles, contain two protons and two neutrons and have a double positive charge.  has a 2+ charge

  9. Ex 1: Alpha radiation is emitted during the disintegration of the following isotopes. Write balanced nuclear equation for their decay processes. • Uranium – 238 238U→4He+ 234Th 92 2 90 • Thorium – 230 230Th→4He+226Ra 90 2 88

  10. Types of Radiation Beta Radiation – consists of fast-moving electrons formed by the decomposition of a neutron in an atom. The fast-moving electrons released by a nucleus are called beta particles.  has a 1- charge

  11. Ex 2: The following radioisotopes are beta emitters. Write balanced nuclear equations for their decay processes. • Carbon – 14 14C→ 14N+ 0e 6 7 -1 • Strontium – 90 90Sr→90Y+0e 38 39 -1

  12. Types of Radiation • Gamma Radiation – is high-energy electromagnetic radiation given off by a radioisotope. Visible light, or the light you see, is also electromagnetic radiation, but of much lower energy. • Gamma rays have no mass and no electrical charge.  has 0 charge

  13. Types of Radiation

  14. Section 28.1 Nuclear Radiation Did We Meet Our Objectives? • Discuss the processes of radioactivity and radioactive decay • Characterize alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of composition and penetrating power

  15. Section 28.2 Nuclear Transformations Objectives: • Use half-life information to determine the amount of a radioisotope remaining at a given time • Give examples of equations for the synthesis of transuranium elements by transmutation

  16. Nuclear Stability and Decay The stability of the nucleus depends on its neutron-to-proton ratio. For elements of low atomic number (below about 20), the ratio for stability is about 1. That means the stable nuclei have roughly equal numbers of neutrons and protons.

  17. Nuclear Stability and Decay Above atomic number 20, stable nuclei have more neutrons than protons. The neutron-to-proton ratio reaches above 1.5 for heavy elements.

  18. Nuclear Stability and Decay The stable nuclei on a neutron-vs-proton plot are located in a region called the band of stability. Unstable nuclei undergo spontaneous radioactive decay.

  19. Ex 3: Identify the more stable isotope in each pair. • 14Cor 13C 6 6 • 3H or 1H 1 1 • 16O or 18O 8 8 • 14Nor 15N 7 7

  20. Nuclear Stability and Decay A nucleus may be unstable for several reason. Some nuclei have too many neutrons relative to the number of protons. These nuclei decay by turning a neutron into a proton by emitting a beta particle (an electron) from the nucleus. This process is known as beta decay or beta emission.

  21. Nuclear Stability and Decay Other nuclei are unstable because they have too few neutrons relative to the number of protons. These nuclei increase their stability by converting a proton to a neutron.

  22. Nuclear Stability and Decay A positron is a particle with the mass of an electron but a positive charge. A positron may be emitted as a proton changes to a neutron.

  23. Nuclear Stability and Decay All nuclei with atomic number greater than 83 are radioactive. These nuclei lie in the upper end of the band of stability, and are especially heavy. They have both too many neutrons and too many protons to be stable. Most of them emit alpha particles.

  24. Nuclear Stability and Decay In alpha emission, the mass number decreases by four and the atomic number decreases by two.

  25. Nuclear Stability and Decay

  26. Half-Life Every radioisotope has a characteristic rate of decay measured by its half-life. A half-life (t½) is the time required for one-half of the nuclei of a radioisotope sample to decay to products.

  27. Half-Life Half-lives may be as short as a fraction of a second or as long as billions of years. Scientist use the half-lives of some naturally occurring radioisotopes to determine the age of ancient artifacts.

  28. Half-Life Many artificially produced radioisotopes have very short half-lives, a feature that is a great advantage in nuclear medicine. The rapidly decaying isotopes do not pose long-term biological radiation hazards to the patient.

  29. Half-Life One isotope that has a long half-life is uranium-238, which decays through a complex series of radioactive intermediates to the stable isotope of lead-206. Because the half-life of uranium is so long, it is possible to date rocks nearly as old as the solar system.

  30. Ex 4: Nitrogen-13 emits beta radiation and decays to carbon-13 with a half-life of 10 min. Assume a starting mass of 2.00 g of nitrogen-13. a) How long is three half-lives? t½ = 10 min 3 half-lives x (t½) = tT 3 x (10 min) = 30 minutes

  31. Ex 4: Nitrogen-13 emits beta radiation and decays to carbon-13 with a half-life of 10 min. Assume a starting mass of 2.00 g of nitrogen-13. b) How many grams of the isotope will still be present at the end of three half-lives? 2.00 g x (½) x (½) x (½) = 0.25 g

  32. Ex 5: Manganese-56 is a beta emitter with a half-life of 2.6 hours. What is the mass of manganese-56 in a 1.0 mg sample of the isotope at the end of 10.4 hours? Half-lives x (2.6 h) = 10.4 h Half-lives = 4 1.0 mg (½)(½)(½)(½) = 0.0625 mg

  33. Ex 6: A sample of thorium-234 has a half-life of 25 days. Will all the thorium undergo radioactive decay in 50 days? Explain. Half-lives x (25 days) = 50 days Half-lives = 2 Sample x (½)(½) = ¼ sample No, ¼ of the sample will remain.

  34. Transmutation Reactions The conversion of an atom of one element to an atom of another element is called transmutation. Radioactive decay is one way in which transmutation occurs. A transmutation can also occur when high-energy particles bombard the nucleus of an atom. The particles may be protons, neutrons, or alpha particles.

  35. Transmutation Reactions Elements in the periodic table with atomic numbers above 92 are called transuranium elements. All of these undergo transmutation.

  36. Ex 7: Complete and balance the equations for the following nuclear reactions. • 27Al+ 4He → 30N+___ 13 2 14 • 214Bi→4He+___ 83 2

  37. Section 28.2 Nuclear Transformations Did We Meet Our Objectives? • Use half-life information to determine the amount of a radioisotope remaining at a given time • Give examples of equations for the synthesis of transuranium elements by transmutation

  38. Section 28.3 Fission and Fusion of Atomic Nuclei Objectives: • Compare nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, and comment on their potential as sources of energy • Describe the methods used in nuclear power plants to produce and control fission reactions • Explain the issues involved in storage, containment, and disposal of nuclear waste

  39. Nuclear Fission When the nuclei of certain isotopes are bombarded with neutrons, they undergo fission, the splitting of a nucleus into smaller fragments. Uranium-235 and plutonium-239 are fissionable materials.

  40. Nuclear Fission As more neutrons are released by fission, these neutrons strike the nuclei of other uranium-235 atoms, creating a chain reaction. Nuclear fission can unleash enormous amounts of energy. Most of these reactions are instantaneous.

  41. Nuclear Fission Fission can be controlled so energy is released more slowly. The control of fission in a nuclear reactor involves two steps. • Neutron Moderation is a process that reduces the speed of neutrons so they can be captured by the reactor fuel in order to continue the chain reaction.

  42. Nuclear Fission Fission can be controlled so energy is released more slowly. The control of fission in a nuclear reactor involves two steps. • Neutron absorption is a process that decreases the number of slow moving neutrons. To prevent the chain reaction from going too fast, some of the slowed neutrons must be trapped before they hit fissionable atoms.

  43. Nuclear Waste Fuel rods from nuclear power plants are one major source of nuclear waste. The fuel rods are made from a fissionable isotope, either uranium-235 or plutonium-239. The fuel rods are typically 3 meters long with a 0.5 cm diameter.

  44. Nuclear Waste Three hundred fuel rods are bundled together to form an assembly and one hundred assemblies are arranged to form the reactor core. Spent fuel rods are classified as high-level nuclear waste.

  45. Nuclear Waste Spent fuel rods contain the remainder of the fissionable isotope along with the fission products, a complex mixture of highly radioactive isotopes. Some of these fission products have very short half-lives, in the order of fractions of seconds. Others have half-lives of hundreds or thousands of years.

  46. Nuclear Waste All nuclear power plants have holding tanks for spent fuel rods. Storage racks at the bottom of these pools are designed to hold the spent fuel assemblies.

  47. Nuclear Waste Water cools the rods, which continue to produce heat for years after their removal from the core. Water also acts as a radiation shield to reduce the radiation levels from the spent fuel rods.

  48. Nuclear Waste The assemblies of spent fuel rods may spend a decade or more in a holding pool. Plant operators expected used fuel rods to be reprocessed to recover the remaining fissionable isotope, which would be recycled in the manufacture of new fuel rods. Unfortunately, it is less expensive to mine for new fuel.

  49. Nuclear Waste In order to keep these plants open, their fuel rods must be moved to off-site storage facilities. The number of years a nuclear plant can operate is limited. Dismantling a nuclear power plant produces thousands of tons of low-level nuclear waste.