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1/10/2011 – 1/14/2011

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1/10/2011 – 1/14/2011

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  1. 1/10/2011 – 1/14/2011 Unit 3: The Tempest Acts I and II & MCAS Preparation

  2. Please sit in your History Seats! • See the front board if you cannot remember where you sit  Monday, 1/10/2011OBJECTIVES: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and Summarize the main events in act oneof the tempest.

  3. Monday, 1/10/2011Objectives: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and summarize the main events in act one of The Tempest. Do Now: Agenda: • Take out your HW • You will have 8 minutes to work with your partner to go over questions #1-14 for Act I, scene ii • Write down on your Do Now sheet which questions you are unsure of • What questions do you have about Act I of The Tempest? • Do Now – review HW • Organize Interactive Notebooks • Review Act I, scene ii • Act I, level 2 questions • Quiz next period!

  4. The play begins with a tempest– a storm created by Prospero and Ariel as a way to disorient Prospero’s enemies who happen to be sailing by his island on their way back to Italy from Africa, where King Alonso ‘s daughter was just married. Prospero wants them to be frightened and stranded on his island. This storm sets up all of the important action in the entire play. Preview of: The Tempest Ac t I, scene 1

  5. Prospero and Miranda talk about the past and he tells her the real story about who she is and how she ended up on the island and why he created the storm she saw. Images from act one, scene 2

  6. Ariel and Prospero talk about the storm– Ariel asks for his freedom and Prospero gets angry. Prospero’s plans are revealed through this conversation. Act one scene 2

  7. Prospero and Miranda go and speak with Caliban, who is ordered to work for them and they argue. Through this scene we learn more about the past– what happened when Prospero and Miranda first arrived on the island. Act one, scene 2

  8. Ariel carries out the next part of Prosepro’s plans and leads Ferdinand to Miranda where they fall in love at first sight. Act one, scene 2

  9. Objective/SWBAT: Describe the characters and summarize the main events in act one of The Tempest. 1.05.2011The Tempest Act I, Scene ii Guided Reading Assignment Reading Comprehension: Answer the following questions in 2-3 complete sentences each as we read Act One, scene 2 (we’ll stop together to answer as many of these in class as we can). Write your answers on page 68 of your Interactive Notebook. • Describe the setting: where does the action in this scene take place? • How does Miranda feel about the shipwreck she witnessed off the coast of the island? • What does Prospero tell his daughter about the shipwreck in lines 33-41? • How old was Miranda when they came to the island and how long have they been there? • What does Miranda tell her father she remembers about life in Milan before they came to the island? • What does Prospero tell Miranda about his past? How does Miranda react to what he tells her? • How did Gonzalo help Prospero? • What does Ariel ask Prospero for on page 29 and how does Prospero react? • What was life like for Ariel before Prospero arrived? • How does Prospero describe Sycorax? • How does Prospero describe Caliban? • Summarize the conversation between Caliban and Prospero on pages 35-39. • What happens when Ferdinand and Miranda meet? • How does Prospero treat Ferdinand?

  10. Act I Analysis --- Level 2 Questions • In Prospero’s questioning of Ariel, we learn that the storm is part of Prospero’s design. Does he want to punish those who conspired against him or lead them to repent (ask for his forgiveness)? • Ariel was imprisoned by Sycorax --- why? How does the physical description of Sycorax compare to your impressions of Ariel? • What connection does Shakespeare establish between the outward appearance and inner spirit? What do you think he wants the reader/audience to feel about these characters? • What is your reaction to Prospero’s treatment of Caliban? Does Caliban have a legitimate complaint against Prospero? Why does Prospero keep Caliban as his servant/slave even though he despises him? Why do you think Caliban attempted to “violate the honor” of Miranda? • Prospero is happy that when Miranda first sees Ferdinand she is immediately captivated by his appearance. Why? What is his plan? • Ferdinand and Miranda fall in love at first sight. Prospero says, “They have changed eyes.” Does this seem feasible/possible, given the emotional state of these two young people?

  11. Tuesday, 1/11/2011OBJECTIVES: SWBAT1. Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages.2. Identify author’s purpose on several practice MCAS poetry passages. NEW SEATS!

  12. Tuesday, 1/11/2011OBJECTIVES: SWBAT1. Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages.2. Identify author’s purpose on several practice MCAS poetry passages. Act One Review: Read the following quote spoken by Prospero from Act One, scene 2. “I thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated to closeness and the bettering of my mind with that which, but by being so retired, O’er prized all popular rate, in my false brother awakened an evil nature.” Questions: The word “bettering” most closely matches the word Intelligent Improvement Concentration Focus Do Now: Agenda: • Do Now • HW • Review: Go over Do Now and pass back quiz from yesterday. Go over quiz • Organize Interactive Notebooks • Watch Act I, scene ii • Fill out The Tempest summary sheet for Act I, scene ii • MCAS lesson on elements of poetry and figurative language • Speaker vs. author/poet • Clickers!

  13. “I need your notebook!” • Jisraele • Jefferson • Reggie • Josh • Jasmine • Brian • Gustavo • Gabe • Djinnie • Stan • Jasmin • Dimitri • Danika

  14. Quiz Make-ups are afterschool Thursday in Room 405

  15. Homework – Character Cardsdue Thursday! • 10 total (character sheet + Sycorax) FRONT • A photo/drawing that represents the character • The name of the character along with a brief description of the character BACK • Two quotes from the original text (along with who said it and which lines) ABOUT the character or BY the character • Your name and class (10C)

  16. Act I Analysis --- Level 2 Questionsdue Thursday! • In Prospero’s questioning of Ariel, we learn that the storm is part of Prospero’s design. Does he want to punish those who conspired against him or lead them to repent (ask for his forgiveness)? • Ariel was imprisoned by Sycorax --- why? How does the physical description of Sycorax compare to your impressions of Ariel? • What connection does Shakespeare establish between the outward appearance and inner spirit? What do you think he wants the reader/audience to feel about these characters? • What is your reaction to Prospero’s treatment of Caliban? Does Caliban have a legitimate complaint against Prospero? Why does Prospero keep Caliban as his servant/slave even though he despises him? Why do you think Caliban attempted to “violate the honor” of Miranda? • Prospero is happy that when Miranda first sees Ferdinand she is immediately captivated by his appearance. Why? What is his plan? • Ferdinand and Miranda fall in love at first sight. Prospero says, “They have changed eyes.” Does this seem feasible/possible, given the emotional state of these two young people?

  17. Watch Act I, scene ii • 1.38-5.42 • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XZ091CEgNU&feature=related

  18. Objective/SWBAT: Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages Notes on Poetry and the MCAS Exam Directions: Take notes during this lesson on what kinds of poetry questions you might be asked on the MCAS exam. 1. What kinds of questions might be asked? 2. What will you need to know to answer questions about poetry on the MCAS? 3. What elements of poetry relate to sound? 4. What elements of poetry relate to the form, or structure of a poem? 5. What elements of poetry are examples of figurative language? 6. Which elements of poetry mentioned in this lesson do you already know? 7. Which elements of poetry mentioned in this lesson are unfamiliar to you?

  19. Objective/SWBAT: Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages MCAS Poetry Notes • Questions on the MCAS exam will be on poetry passages. • These questions ask about the elements of poetry, such as sound, form, figurative language and structure. • These questions may be multiple choice or open response. • Some questions might ask you to interpret the meaning of selected lines in a poem. Other questions might ask you about a more specific choice the poet has made– for example, the idea the poet conveys by choosing to use a certain word or phrase in a poem. • Many questions will ask you to choose the poetic technique an author uses to convey a certain point. • You might also be asked to identify metaphors or similes in the passages as well as instances of personification and symbolism as well as the effect of sound (rhyme, assonance, alliteration) or the form of the poem (ballad, sonnet, couplet).

  20. LG/SWBAT: Identify examples of Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages. Review: Simile • A simile is a type of figurative language in which two unlike things are compared using the words like or as to convey a meaning/point. Examples: • I am as lazy as a sloth. In this example the person/speaker is being compared to an animal/sloth. • You are as beautiful as the sun. Here a person is being compared to the sun to convey the person’s radiant beauty. • He is fast like the wind. Here, a person is being compared to the wind to convey the person’s speed.

  21. Questions: What does the poet most likely mean when he writes in line 5 that the king “took many an enemy’s chair”? He stole his enemies belongings. He forgave many of his enemies. He dethroned many of his enemies. He helped many of his enemies. 2.How does the poet help readers understand that his subject was a “good king”? By listing details By using short lines By saying he was an orphan By using a historical setting 3. What does the poet describe in lines 1,2, and 3? The work of another famous poet The history of an area The lives of his parents A war between warriors and kings Practice Passage 1: Excerpt from Beowulf 1You have heard of the Danish Kings in the old days and how they were great warriors. Shield, the son of Sheaf, 5took many an enemy’s chair, terrified may a warrior, after he was found an orphan. He prospered under the sky until people everywhere 10listened when he spoke. He was a good king!

  22. Practice Passage #2: I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth For oft, when on my couch I lie 20In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills And dances with the daffodils. 1I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils, 5Beside the lake, beneath the trees Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line 10Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced, but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: 15A poet could not but be gay In such a jocund company: I gazed– and gazed– but little thought What wealthy the show to me had brought. Questions: 4.What does the speaker mean when he says in lines 15 and 16, “A poet could not but be gay/in such a jocund company”? The sight is so uplifting, it makes him happy. The smell is so strong, it makes him tired. There are so many flowers that he feels lonely. The flowers are so bright that he has a headache. 5. What does the author describe in line 12? the way the ladies danced the way the clouds shifted the way the flowers moved the way the stars sparkled 6. What simile does the speaker use for the amount of flowers he sees? Clouds in the sky Hills in the valley Stars in the galaxy Waves in the ocean

  23. Monday, 1/10/2011 (second block)Objectives: SWBAT1. Demonstrate their understanding of Act I of The Tempest by taking an Act I Reading Quiz. Do Now: Agenda: • List and describe 5 important events from Act One. Use your books and your homework to help you. • 3 minutes review • Act I reading quiz! • Watch Act I, Scene ii on video • Work on Analysis Questions

  24. Tuesday, 1/04/2011OBJECTIVES: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and Summarize the main events in act one, scene one of the tempest. Do Now: Review from this morning Agenda: 1. In your own words, describe what happened in Act I, scene i. 2. What characters were involved in this scene and what was the tension between them? Why was there tension? • Do Now • Read and act out Act I, scene i. • The Tempest summary sheet • [if time permits] Continue reading (acting out) Act I, scene ii. • Partner work– go over reading comprehension questions • Exit Ticket

  25. Extra Credit Packets? • Or MCAS Prep Packet #4? • Turn them in now! • Also, do not be late to class! I am keeping track of tardies… check with me AFTER class to see how many you have. • 3 = Incident Report • Any after 3 = Incident Report for each thereafter

  26. The Tempest Act I, Scene I Post-Reading • On your The Tempest Summary sheet, summarize this scene by answering the following questions: 1. Who? Who is involved in this scene and how are they involved? 2. What? What happens? 3. Where? Where does this scene take place? 4. Why? Why do you think this might be an important scene? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XZ091CEgNU&feature=related

  27. Wednesday, 1/05/2011Objectives: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and summarize the main events in act one of The Tempest. Do Now: Agenda: • What questions do you have about act one, scene i of The Tempest? • What three adjectives would you use to describe the Boatswain? • What three adjectives would you use to describe the noblemen (i.e., Alonso, Sebastian, Gonzalo)? • Do Now • Review homework • Read Act I, scene ii (Prospero & Miranda) • Answer questions --- MCAS packet check • [if time permits] read Prospero + Ariel parts

  28. COLLECT DO NOW SHEETS!

  29. HOMEWORK • Due MONDAY • Read “No Fear Shakespeare” version of The Tempest • Read left-side (original text) FIRST • Read right-side (modern-day translation) NEXT • Re-read original text… !! • Answer questions 1-14 on page 68 of Interactive Notebook • Fill in ‘Analysis Two’ graphic organizer – staple, this side up on page 68 (on top of questions) • Due TUESDAY • MCAS Packet #4 “Test” Corrections • Write on pages 69-70 of your Interactive Notebook

  30. Act I Quiz is Monday! • The semester is quickly ending; this is a good way to bring up your grade by doing well on this!

  31. Where this Takes Place…

  32. MCAS Strategies: • Preview the questions • Read Actively (annotate the text– margin summary notes, underline key words/phrases, paraphrase). • Use process of elimination when answering multiple choice questions • Re-read short passages • Look back at the text as you answer questions.

  33. Open Response Questions • Open response questions are connected to a reading passage. • You must write one-two well, written and organized paragraphs. • You need to include specific and direct quotes from the passage to support your answer to the open response question. • You need to include a topic sentence, two pieces of evidence, contextualization and analysis.

  34. Steps for answering open response questions on the MCAS • Turn the prompt/ORQ into a question in your own words • Example MCAS ORQ: “Based on the poem, explain how the poet shows that he feels guilty about killing the man. Use relevant and specific information from the poem to support your answer.” • Example KFQ (kid-friendly-question): How does the poet show that he feels guilty about killing the man? • Your answer to the questions becomes your topic sentence. Make sure you include the title and author in the topic sentence as well. • Example: In the poem “The Man He Killed” by Thomas Hardy, the poet shows his guilt over killing the man in several ways.

  35. Friday, 1/14/2011OBJECTIVE: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and Summarize the main events in act two, scene one of the tempest. Please sit as close to your seat as possible in this room.

  36. Friday, 1/14/2011OBJECTIVE: SWBAT1. Describe the characters and Summarize the main events in act two, scene one of the tempest. Do Now: Agenda: • Based on what happened in Act I, what do you think Act II is going to be about? • Why? • When you are finished fill out the summary sheet for Act I (scenes I and ii) • Do Now • The Tempest summary sheet for Act I • Read Act II through whole class and partner work • Partner work

  37. Objective/SWBAT: Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages Notes on Poetry and the MCAS Exam Directions: Take notes during this lesson on what kinds of poetry questions you might be asked on the MCAS exam. 1. What kinds of questions might be asked? 2. What will you need to know to answer questions about poetry on the MCAS? 3. What elements of poetry relate to sound? 4. What elements of poetry relate to the form, or structure of a poem? 5. What elements of poetry are examples of figurative language? 6. Which elements of poetry mentioned in this lesson do you already know? 7. Which elements of poetry mentioned in this lesson are unfamiliar to you?

  38. Objective/SWBAT: Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages MCAS Poetry Notes • Questions on the MCAS exam will be on poetry passages. • These questions ask about the elements of poetry, such as sound, form, figurative language and structure. • These questions may be multiple choice or open response. • Some questions might ask you to interpret the meaning of selected lines in a poem. Other questions might ask you about a more specific choice the poet has made– for example, the idea the poet conveys by choosing to use a certain word or phrase in a poem. • Many questions will ask you to choose the poetic technique an author uses to convey a certain point. • You might also be asked to identify metaphors or similes in the passages as well as instances of personification and symbolism as well as the effect of sound (rhyme, assonance, alliteration) or the form of the poem (ballad, sonnet, couplet).

  39. LG/SWBAT: Identify examples of Describe simile and identify examples of similes on practice MCAS passages. Review: Simile • A simile is a type of figurative language in which two unlike things are compared using the words like or as to convey a meaning/point. Examples: • I am as lazy as a sloth. In this example the person/speaker is being compared to an animal/sloth. • You are as beautiful as the sun. Here a person is being compared to the sun to convey the person’s radiant beauty. • He is fast like the wind. Here, a person is being compared to the wind to convey the person’s speed.

  40. Questions: What does the poet most likely mean when he writes in line 5 that the king “took many an enemy’s chair”? He stole his enemies belongings. He forgave many of his enemies. He dethroned many of his enemies. He helped many of his enemies. 2.How does the poet help readers understand that his subject was a “good king”? By listing details By using short lines By saying he was an orphan By using a historical setting 3. What does the poet describe in lines 1,2, and 3? The work of another famous poet The history of an area The lives of his parents A war between warriors and kings Practice Passage 1: Excerpt from Beowulf 1You have heard of the Danish Kings in the old days and how they were great warriors. Shield, the son of Sheaf, 5took many an enemy’s chair, terrified may a warrior, after he was found an orphan. He prospered under the sky until people everywhere 10listened when he spoke. He was a good king!

  41. Practice Passage #2: I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth For oft, when on my couch I lie 20In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills And dances with the daffodils. 1I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils, 5Beside the lake, beneath the trees Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line 10Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced, but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: 15A poet could not but be gay In such a jocund company: I gazed– and gazed– but little thought What wealthy the show to me had brought. Questions: 4.What does the speaker mean when he says in lines 15 and 16, “A poet could not but be gay/in such a jocund company”? The sight is so uplifting, it makes him happy. The smell is so strong, it makes him tired. There are so many flowers that he feels lonely. The flowers are so bright that he has a headache. 5. What does the author describe in line 12? the way the ladies danced the way the clouds shifted the way the flowers moved the way the stars sparkled 6. What simile does the speaker use for the amount of flowers he sees? Clouds in the sky Hills in the valley Stars in the galaxy Waves in the ocean

  42. King Alonso and his men, stranded together, wander the island in search of Ferdinand. Gonzalo tries to convince Alonso of Ferdinand’s survival. Ariel puts all the men asleep except for Antonio and Sebastian. Antonio takes this opportunity to convince Sebastian to kill King Alonso and Gonzalo so that Sebastian can take over throne of Naples. Ariel, invisible, wakes Gonzalo, who wakes the rest. Then the men resume their search. Act Two, scene 1

  43. Trinculo finds Caliban hiding under a cloak and Trinculo joins him to seek shelter from the storm. Stephano, drunk, finds them both and shares his drink with them. In exchange for this drink, Caliban swears to be Stephano’s subject and to abandon Prospero. Act Two, scene 2

  44. How we will read this scene • I will read a section aloud… • You will re-read the same section with your partner (both partners switching reading) • Look at the scene’s vocabulary to help you ‘translate’ the section into modern language • Use your best judgment/guess to determine what this section means, write this down in your graphic organizer • SEPARATELY fill in your worksheet with what you think this section means • Then work with your partner to determine what this part ‘translated’ to. • We will discuss full class what this section means

  45. Example, Lines 1-17 • Gonzalo tells Alonso to cheer up as they are still alive (it is a miracle!). • Alonso tells Gonzalo to not say anything more, as he is sad and depressed (over his supposed son’s death). • Sebastian and Antonio make rude comments about Gonzalo (“Alonso enjoys Gonzalo’s comforting words almost as much as cold oatmeal”)

  46. Partner Work Expectations • Move your seats together so you have work space • Work and talk to only with your partner • Keep a low voice; no yelling across the room • Stay on topic, conversations are only about The Tempest • Follow the instructions to fill out the worksheet; do all steps so that you may better understand the play!

  47. Partners • I am allowing you to choose your partner, but if you are not working, your partner will be changed.

  48. Partners • Jasmin & Nicole • JJ & Andrea • Rachelle & Stan • Rishab & Gustavo • Mildred & Aaliyah • Dimitri, Nelson, & Larissa • Danika & Jisraele • Josh & Brian • Djinnie & Milly • Jennifer & Ashley • Gabe & Jefferson