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Writing an Article Review

Writing an Article Review

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Writing an Article Review

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  1. Writing an Article Review

  2. Remember book reviews? • Bibliographic information • Author • Title • Plot summary • Your opinion: would you recommendthis book to others?

  3. • Includes author/title Subject: often fictionor leisure reading Question—worth reading for fun? Audience: fellow readers Gives bibliographic info (APA) Subject: information re: a profession/field of study Question—good information? Audience: professionals Book reviews vs. article reviews

  4. What do people in your field read? • Business—WSJ, HBR • CJ— • Medical— • IT—

  5. What do people in your field read? If you don’t know, how can you find out?

  6. What do people in your field read? • Ask them. • Observe their “in” baskets. • Check library shelves. • Google; e.g, “criminal justice” journal orname of professional association

  7. What is professional reading? • What people in your field read • Material written for people withbackground in the field • Material published by a professional organization (e.g., AMA or SHRM)

  8. Is Bennett’s article professional? • Compare/contrast Register article & Bennett’s article

  9. Have background or expertise Use jargon and technical terms Want details and/or new information Interested in technical information Professional vs. general audience • May have no background • Unfamiliar with jargon • Want the basics in “layman’s language” • May be confused or intimidated by technicalities

  10. Professional reading… • builds background, so you understand terms and concepts • helps you stay current with–new methods–best practices–latest jargon • helps you learn to think like an expert

  11. Why do article reviews? • To keep up with professional reading

  12. Why do article reviews? • To keep up with professional reading • To show that you are familiar with the literature of your field

  13. Why do article reviews? • To keep up with professional reading • To show that you know your field • To cope with information overload

  14. How much information? 1999—twoexabytes (two billion gigabytes) 2002—fiveexabyles (five billion gigabytes)

  15. How much information? This is equivalent to half a million libraries the size of America’s Library of Congress, or about 800 megabytesper person per year. How Much Information survey School of Information Management and Systems UC Berkeley (2004) http://ko.offroadpakistan.com/writings/2004_02/information_overload.html

  16. That is why reviews include • article reviews • reviewer’s columns • reviews of the literature(article reviews on steroids)

  17. The point of a review…. • …is to describe the book/article's content and argument(s) and to [discuss] the presentation and its effectiveness, supported with some quotations … that illustrate the points you're making. A person who has not read the [article] should be able to decide, from what you have written, whether or not to read the [article]. • Amanda Graham; Guide for the Perplexed

  18. Does the Bennis review… • describe the book/article's content and argument(s)? • discuss the presentation and its effectiveness? • Provide support with quotations • Give enough information to let you decide whether the article is worth reading? • Amanda Graham; Guide for the Perplexed

  19. To write an article review… • Choose an article written for professionals. • Read it critically. • Summarize the content. • Evaluate the content. • Provide complete APA documentation.

  20. Summarize the content • Give an overview (generally 1-2 ¶s). • Use more of your own words than the author’s. • Provide transitions (connecting words) and generalizations to help your reader follow the content.

  21. Evaluate the article Questions you might consider: • What is the author’s purpose? • Is the purpose achieved? • Does the author have any special credentials? • Do you find evidence of bias or inaccuracies? • How useful is the article? • How does it compare to others on the topic?

  22. FAQs on Article Reviews …covering “How do I find an article?” lastbecause you’ll have time for thatat the end of class

  23. FAQ: How do I organize it? • Introductionany relevant background about author or topic • Summaryoverview of arguments • Evaluationstrengths/weaknesses of articleyour reflections about the topic • Conclusion • Reference list (APA citation)

  24. without saying something trite and obvious like “The article I chose to write about is…” (yawn) FAQ: How do I start my review…

  25. A formerly out-of-control teenager recounts her life-altering experiences at Peninsula Village, a residential treatment center in Tennessee that uses behavior-modification techniques to reform seriously troubled kids. Sample intro: Bad Girl review

  26. . . . to reform seriously troubled kids. Vona dictated most of her story; she has dyslexia and is barely able to read or write, though her memoir doesn't make it clear how much her learning disability contributed to her problems growing up in Connecticut…. Bad Girl introduction (2)

  27. Rev. of the book Bad girl: Confessions of a teenage delinquent. (2004). Kirkus Reviews 72: 532. Retrieved July 11, 2004, from MasterFILE Premier database. Citation: Bad Girl review

  28. without saying something predictable and obvious like “this is a good article”or “this was fascinating (boring)” (yawn) FAQ: How do I end my review…

  29. This book will tell the reader all he could possibly wish to know about gunpowder, such as the fact that the Chinese did use gunpowder as a weapon. However, it is a mystery why Kelly added an epilogue dealing with the atomic bomb, which clearly is not a gunpowder weapon. Conclusion: Gunpowder review

  30. All in all, the book has a place on the shelves of the serious student of arms, armament and the never-ending search by man to develop more efficient ways of killing his neighbors. Conclusion (2): Gunpowder review

  31. Consider questions like• What would this article add to readers’ knowledge of the subject? • Was the author fair or biased? • What (if anything) makes this worth reading? For conclusions…

  32. Kelly, J. (2003). Rev. of the book Gunpowder— alchemy bombards & pyrotechnics: The history of the explosive that changed the world. Military History, 21(3): 68-69. Retrieved July 11, 2004, from Academic Search Elite database. Gunpowder source

  33. FAQ: How do I find an article? • To find a topic, look over magazines or go to a site like cnn.com or the sites recommended on the Research page of the course support site • Search electronic databases • Ask Susan or an instructor

  34. FAQ: How do I find an article? • If you search a database, skim article titles and abstracts

  35. Abstract: Nursing Ethicslit review This article provides an overview of the scarce international literature concerning nurses' attitudes to euthanasia. . . . Characteristics such as age, religion and nursing specialty have a significant influence on a nurse's opinion.

  36. Abstract: Nursing Ethicslit review Verpoort, C., Gastmans, C., De Bal, N., & de Casterlie. B. D. (2004, July). Nurses’ attitudes to euthanasia: A review of the literature. Nursing Ethics, 11(4):349-365.

  37. FAQ: Is it professional? Ask yourself: How close is it to the source?

  38. News Brief (goal-setting) According to recent research at Wharton, goal-setting can encourage cheating. Researchers advise managers who reward workers for achieving goals to be alert for unethical behavior. Compare to the original: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/1017.cfm

  39. Review of article (goal-setting) … goal-setting also has a dark side to it, according to a recent research paper by a Wharton faculty member and two colleagues. In addition to motivating constructive behavior, goal setting— especially when it involves rewards— can motivate unethical behavior when people fall short of the goals they set or that are set for them. The relationship . . . is particularly strong when people fall just short of reaching the goal. http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/1017.cfm

  40. OriginalGoal-Setting Article

  41. Still not sure it’s professional? Check out “Magazine or Journal?” at http://www.millikin.edu/staley/pertype.html

  42. FAQ: Log-in info for EBSCO? Go to search.epnet.com Log in: User ID: s7742903 Password: password Choose EBSCOhostWeb Choose database(s)/Continue

  43. FAQ: How do I search EBSCO? • Fields • Limiters (full text, peer-reviewed)

  44. FAQ: How do I find CJ/legal…? Go to www.kaplancollege.com Click on Faculty/Registered Students User ID: DesMoinesLibraryPassword: HD4321 Enter the UAH Salmon Library Choose Electronic Articles Choose Proquest Criminal Justice Last name: desmoines Kaplan ID: DMS0105a

  45. FAQ: More info on APA? • See Hamilton Style Sheet • APA’s Publication Manual • www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite6.html • www.dianahacker.com/ • www.APAstyle.org • Citation Machine • www.landmark-project.com/citation_machine

  46. FAQ: Model reviews? Knowledge@Wharton http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/ InformIT.com www.informit.com (search for review) Lit Review: Mass Media and Mental Illnesshttp://www.ontario.cmha.ca/content/about_mental_illness/mass_media.asp

  47. FAQ: More help! • word-crafter.net/CompII/articlereview.html