Download
differentiated instruction strategies r a f t n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Differentiated Instruction Strategies R.A.F.T. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Differentiated Instruction Strategies R.A.F.T.

Differentiated Instruction Strategies R.A.F.T.

124 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Differentiated Instruction Strategies R.A.F.T.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Differentiated Instruction StrategiesR.A.F.T. Kyle George EDU-384 July 11th 2014

  2. R.ole—A.udience—F.ormat—T.opic • Strategy that helps students understand writers, citizens, characters, other students. • A strategy that encourages writing across the curriculum. • ..the student will assume a ROLE • consider their AUDIENCE, while • examining a TOPIC from their chosen perspective, and • writing in a particular FORMAT

  3. R.A.F.T. • The ROLE of a writer, speaker,artist, historian, reporter, eyewitness. • An AUDIENCE of fellow writers, • students, citizens, characters. • Through a FORMAT that is • written, spoken, drawn, acted. • A TOPIC related to curriculum • content in greater depth.

  4. Benefits of the R.A.F.T Style: • Be differentiated in a variety of ways: readiness level, learning profile, and students interest. • Be created by the student (Create a blank row for that option in your grid) • One consistent column while varying the other columns in the raft grid. • Be creative with different ideas.

  5. Possible R.A.F.T. Topics: • Complaint • Confession • contest entry • Farewell • Journal • Diary • legal brief • Memo • news story • Obituary • Pamphlet • photo essay • Recommendation • Sermon • Review

  6. Example: Personal Fitness RAFT

  7. R.A.F.T. Activity • Let’s pretend that you are your favorite piece of school playground • equipment. Create a small poster that will show through words • and pictures how students can cooperate to share your idea • Pretend you are your teacher talking to student who is new • to class. • Write a small role-play dialogue of you explaining to the • student what the rules are for how students in the class • cooperate with one another. Be sure to talk about and give • examples of compromise. • Pretend you are the classroom clock. Write a letter to the • class that describes what you notice when you watch • students cooperate. Be sure to give examples of ways you • see them compromise and share ideas amongst themselves.

  8. Compromise = Cooperate