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Community Food Security Nutrition Planning

Community Food Security Nutrition Planning

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Community Food Security Nutrition Planning

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  1. Community Food Security Nutrition Planning Coordinated by Healthy Acadia, Healthy Peninsula, Bucksport Bay Healthy Communities, Maine Seacoast Mission

  2. Community Food Security Nutrition Planning • Overview of what we know about local families and food security

  3. Community Food Security Nutrition Planning • Overview of what we know about local families and food security • Process for food security and nutrition planning in our communities

  4. Community Food Security Nutrition Planning • Overview of what we know about local families and food security • Process for food security and nutrition planning in our communities • Examples of what other communities have done to improve nutrition and food security

  5. Research Findings Purpose:to better understand the food and nutrition needs of people in our region. Method: Five food pantries 71 food pantry clients Review of demographic data and literature Findings…

  6. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: • Approximately half of Hancock County families do not earn a “livable wage”

  7. Poverty vs. Living Wage Livable Wage ≥ $46,030 Federal Poverty Level ≤$18,850 difference = $27,180 The number of families below the federal poverty level is not a reliable indicator of food security.

  8. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: • Food assistance does not equal food security. Food security includes at a minimum: • the ready availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. • assured ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways

  9. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: Poverty exists throughout Hancock County including coastal communities

  10. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: • Food stamp participation rates have increased dramatically in Hancock County

  11. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: • Food stamp participation rates have increased dramatically in Hancock County • Food pantries are reporting a trend of increased numbers of clients

  12. Research Findings Demographics and literature told us: • Women are the primary food “gatekeepers” in families.

  13. Food Pantry Client Interviews Food insecurity is an issue in our communities. • 73% “often” or “sometimes” worry whether their food will run out before they get money to buy more.

  14. Food Pantry Client Interviews Food insecurity is an issue in our communities. • 73% “often” or “sometimes” worry whether their food will run out before they get money to buy more. • 69% have to make choices between spending money on food and spending money on other needs.

  15. Food Pantry Client Interviews The food stamp program doesn’t meet all of the local food needs. • 46% participate in the food stamp program. • Many people are either ineligible or don’t think they are eligible.

  16. Food Pantry Client Interviews The majority want to eat fruit and vegetables. • 65% eat fruit and/or vegetables daily • 50% would like to eat fruit/vegetables more often For those who would like to eat more, Money and Access are the major barriers

  17. Food Pantry Client Interviews Food pantry clients work hard to provide food for their families • low-budget retail stores • food stamps • grocery stores • WIC • food pantries • Senior Farm Share • home gardens • and more.

  18. Food Pantry Client Interviews Many people feel that they already know a lot about food preparation • 76% said they do not want to learn more about how to cook or prepare food • 90% said that either they or a family member prepare meals daily for the household

  19. Food Pantry Client Interviews Most people have the cooking equipment that they need. • 85% said that they have all of the kitchen utensils and equipment that they need to prepare food.

  20. RECOMMENDATIONS • Explore ways to make fruit, vegetables, and other healthy foods more accessible to low-income populations.

  21. RECOMMENDATIONS • Explore ways to make fruit, vegetables, and other healthy foods more accessible to low-income populations. • Nutrition programming should validate and honor participants’ current knowledge about food and nutrition.

  22. RECOMMENDATIONS • Explore ways to make fruit, vegetables, and other healthy foods more accessible to low-income populations. • Nutrition programming should validate and honor participants’ current knowledge about food and nutrition • Take a “food systems” perspective: Shape your local food system - from grower to consumer - to make it serve your communities needs.

  23. “Food for Thought, Food for Action” Published by Healthy Acadia and Healthy Peninsula in 2006. Contact Heather Albert-Knopp for more information. 359-2157 Email: halbertknopp@healthypeninsula.org

  24. Community Food Security and Nutrition Planning Purpose: To develop community-based strategies that help people choose and access healthy foods.

  25. Creating a Plan for Action:Community Food Security and Nutrition Assets Issues Strategies Collaborators The Individuals, Associations and Institutions that allow and encourage people to choose and access healthy foods. Your list of assets might include: Businesses, Hospitals, Churches, School Lunch Programs, Libraries, Colleges, Clubs, Skills of Individuals, Food Pantries, Farmers, Co-ops,

  26. Creating a Plan for Action: Community Food Security and Nutrition Assets Issues Strategies Collaborators The challenges and barriers that keep people from choosing and accessing healthy foods…. What are they? The issues you wish to address may include: diet-related health concerns, isolated elderly people, lack of knowledge about local food resources, etc.

  27. Creating a Plan for Action: Community Food Security and Nutrition Assets Issues Strategies Collaborators Strategies you develop will be unique to your community’s assets and needs. Strategies might include: A new food distribution system, connecting senior citizens with a community garden, or raising money for food storage or processing equipment. What can be done to improve nutrition education and healthy food access in your community?

  28. Creating a Plan for Action: Community Food Security and Nutrition Assets Issues Strategies Collaborators Who will implement the strategies? Collaborators are the organizations and/or individuals in your community who will help take this plan from vision to reality.

  29. Programs to Increase Community Food Security & Nutrition

  30. Community & School Gardens • Grow fresh produce • Personal and communal function • Educational opportunities • Community mobilization Community Example: COA community garden

  31. Farmers’ Markets • Alternative food supply • Accessible source of fresh products • Support farmers • Community space Community Example: Winter Harbor Farmers’ Market

  32. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) • Purchase share of farm’s harvest • Learn about seasonal growing • Know your farmer • Build community • Pricing options Community Example: Mandala Farm CSA shares

  33. Farm to Cafeteria & Youth Programs • Link farms with community institutions • Increase consumption of fruits and vegetables • Educational resource Community Example: Hancock County Farm to School

  34. Transportation Services • Increase food accessibility • Bring customers to stores • Bring food to stores • Bring food to individuals Community Example: Island Connections

  35. Food Buying Cooperatives • Member owned and operated • Reduce cost of food • Support local farmers • Create community Community Example: Blue Hill Food Co-op Courtesy of METRO, John Steinhorst

  36. Food Recovery & Gleaning • Collection of edible but un-sellable food • Good use of already existing food sources

  37. Community Kitchens • Community cooperation • Prepared food made at reduced cost and time • Economic development Community Example: Healthy Life Café Courtesy of METRO, John Steinhorst

  38. Social Marketing • Advertisement of food products to encourage healthy eating • Sampling stations • Store displays • Food packaging • Educational booths • Support of local farmers and producers

  39. Land Use Planning & Public Food Policy • Remove structural barriers to accessing healthy foods • Create policies that support increasing availability of healthy foods

  40. Community Food Assessment • Participatory, collaborative process • Identify food resources and challenges • Develop community specific strategies

  41. Let’s create a food system that serves our communities’ needs!