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IMAGES & ON-SCREEN TEXT are portrayed in ARIAL FONT

IMAGES & ON-SCREEN TEXT are portrayed in ARIAL FONT

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IMAGES & ON-SCREEN TEXT are portrayed in ARIAL FONT

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  1. IMAGES & ON-SCREEN TEXTare portrayed in ARIAL FONT

  2. NARRATION and PRODUCTION NOTES are in Courier New font

  3. What is a Waste Audit ?

  4. What is a waste audit? (Main Title)

  5. What is a Waste Audit ? • A waste audit is a study of the quantity, distribution and composition of the solid wastes a facility generates.

  6. It is a study of the quantity, distribution, and composition of the solid waste a facility generates. (Definition dissolves in)

  7. Waste Auditing • Involves determining: • how much waste is generated • what kinds of waste are generated • sources and causes of waste

  8. Performing a waste audit will tell you: - how much waste is generated - what kinds of waste are generated - sources and causes of waste (Bullet points dissolve in as mentioned)

  9. Waste Auditing • Will help you to identify: -priority wastes: high-volume, toxic, or hazardous substances which should be eliminated -further opportunities for waste reduction and pollution prevention -wastes which can be sold, bartered, or traded on a materials exchange or elsewhere

  10. Waste auditing will help you identify: -priority wastes: those high-volume, toxic, or hazardous substances which should be eliminated for economic, environmental, or safety reasons -further opportunities for waste reduction and pollution prevention -wastes which can be sold, bartered, or traded on a materials exchange or elsewhere

  11. Waste Auditing • Helps you to comply with new and existing environmental laws and regulations • Helps you meet the criteria for international certification (e.g. ISO 14000)

  12. Waste auditing also... • helps you to comply with new and • existing environmental laws and • regulations, and... • helps you meet the standards for • international certification, • such as ISO 14000

  13. Environmental Economic

  14. The benefits of waste auditing are both environmental and economic. (Words appear onscreen)

  15. less waste • reduced pollution • toxics control • preservation of • land Environmental Economic

  16. (‘Economic’ grays out; bullet points dissolve in with the following narration) Environmental benefits include -less waste to be disposed of -reduced pollution of air, water, and soil from landfill leachate and incineration -reduction or elimination of toxic substances from the waste stream -preservation of land, such as natural areas and farmland

  17. less waste • reduced pollution • toxics control • preservation of • land Environmental • lower costs • higher efficiency • potential revenues • compliance Economic

  18. (‘Environmental’ and bullet points gray out; ‘Economic’ and associated bullet points dissolve in with the following narration): Economic benefits include -lower costs. Operating costs, waste disposal costs, and materials costs will be reduced; -improved efficiencies in materials use and in production processes -potential revenues from the sale of reusable or recyclable material -compliance with laws, regulations and international standards, opening up broader markets

  19. ? ?? ?????? ? How do I perform a Waste Audit?

  20. Whether you work for an industry, a government office, a small business, or any other institution, performing a waste audit provides the opportunity to reduce waste, protect the environment, and save money. Nearly every operation benefits from an examination of its waste generation patterns. This section of the program will show you how. (Music / sfx transition with animated title)

  21. Waste Auditing: The Basic Steps 1. Review Operations 2. Identify Wastes 3. Plan the audit 4. Conduct the audit 5. Analyze the data 6. Report and implement your findings

  22. A waste audit has six basic steps: (bullet points dissolve in with narration) 1. Review the operations of the facility or location where the audit will occur 2. Identify the types of wastes which you will encounter during your audit 3. Plan the audit based upon the information you gather in steps 1 and 2 4. Conduct the waste audit according to your plan 5. Analyze the data that you collect 6. Report and implement your findings

  23. Step1. Review Operations - physical layout - functional operation

  24. The first step in any audit is to review the operations of the facility where the audit will be performed. You will need to understand both the physicallayout and the functional operation of the facility. (Bullet points dissolve in in the foreground with narration. Background graphic showing halftone floor plan moves across screen; halftone animated flowchart [moving arrows and boxes?] superimposed)

  25. Layout of ABC Company Reception Cafeteria Shop Receiving Key waste generating area

  26. A good starting point is to obtain or create a plan of the physical layout of your facility. In larger operations, you may require several such plans. On the plan, you can identify key waste generation areas. You will refer to these later in the auditing process. Sometimes, waste audits are conducted over large areas like entire municipalities. In such cases, details about waste collection routes, schedules, building types, and frequency of waste collection are required.

  27. Background Data For each facility or department, collect and record general information including: • type of operation • location of operation • size of operation • number of employees • number of operating days per year

  28. Basic background data is required for • every waste audit. For each facility, • department, or locale, collect and • record general information including: • type of operation • location of operation • size of operation • number of employees • number of operating days per year • (bullet points dissolve in with narration)

  29. For each department or activity in larger facilities you should record: • names of contact persons • location of each activity or operation • size of each operation • number of employees • special characteristics of operation (e.g. uses toxics; has production peaks, etc.)

  30. In larger facilities or operations, more • information may be required to create a • complete waste generation profile. On a • department-by-department basis, you should • record: • the names of contact persons • the location of each activity or operation • the size of each operation • the number of employees • any special characteristics (e.g. uses • toxics; has production peaks, etc.) • (bullet points dissolve in with narration)

  31. (Sample Worksheet 3a/b) PRINT FORM

  32. Other data may be collected and recorded as required. No two facilities are identical. A form like this one is useful for collecting and organizing your data.

  33. Existing Waste Management Systems and Activities • reuse systems • recycling systems • disposal systems • informal sector activities

  34. You must also collect information on the existing waste management activities in place. These may include: Reuse - what materials or items are reused onsite or elsewhere? Recycling - what materials are recycled onsite or elsewhere? Where are they collected? Who are the contractors? What are the costs? Disposal - who collects your facility’s wastes? What are the costs? What methods are used? Informal sector activities - are wastes collected efficiently by scavengers or self-employed recyclers? Are partnerships with these people a possibility?

  35. (Sample Worksheet 3c/d/e/f) PRINT FORM

  36. A worksheet like this one is useful to help you collect information on existing waste management systems and activities.

  37. Step 2: Identifying Wastes Reception Cafeteria Shop Receiving Key waste generating area

  38. Step 2 in the waste auditing process is to identify wastes. Using your knowledge of production processes and the map or diagram of your facility which you obtained or created earlier, you can identify the different sites in your facility which generate distinct types of waste.

  39. (Image of production area)

  40. For example, the production area of a manufacturing facility might generate: - corrugated cardboard - metals - plastics - pallets - sludges (words or images of wastes appear superimposed on image of production area as words are spoken) (use real examples from facility audited)

  41. (Image of office area)

  42. The office or administrative area of a manufacturing facility might generate: - office paper - mixed paper - plastics (words or images of wastes appear superimposed on image of office or administrative area as words are spoken) (use real examples from facility audited)

  43. (Image of cafeteria or canteen)

  44. The cafeteria or canteen area of a manufacturing facility might generate: - food wastes - glass, metal, and plastic food and beverage containers - disposable food service items (words or images of wastes appear superimposed on image of cafeteria as words are spoken) (use real examples from facility audited)

  45. Identifying Wastes Major materials categories: PAPER GLASS FERROUS METAL NONFERROUS METAL PLASTICS TEXTILES LEATHER RUBBER ...etc...

  46. Many different categories and types of waste materials exist. A classification scheme for waste has been provided in the ‘Materials Identification’ section of this program. Some standard recommended major materials classes are: PAPER, GLASS,FERROUS METALS, NONFERROUS METALS, PLASTICS, TEXTILES, LEATHER, RUBBER, and WOOD.

  47. Many sub-classes of materials can be used in your audit. The materials classification scheme provided in this program covers a large number of these, but individual audits may require additional categories of materials depending upon the composition of the wastes generated in the facility. Preparing a detailed breakdown of waste composition, using many different categories, is always a good idea. You can always combine detailed materials categories into broader categories later, but you cannot go the other way.

  48. Step 3: Planning the Audit (A) Determine Waste Audit Methodology (B) Choose your sample period (C) Determine Resource Requirements

  49. The third step in waste auditing is to plan the audit. This consists of three tasks: a. Choose a method b. Choose a sampling strategy c. Identify audit resource requirements (Bullet points dissolve in in the foreground with narration.)