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Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Arts Activities May 2011 Office of Research & PowerPoint Presentation
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Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Arts Activities May 2011 Office of Research &

Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Arts Activities May 2011 Office of Research &

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Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Arts Activities May 2011 Office of Research &

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  1. Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Arts Activities • May 2011 • Office of Research & Analysis • National Endowment for the Arts • arts.gov/research

  2. Value as Expressed by • Size of Industry, Workforce, Revenue • -United States Census Bureau • Consumer Spending • -Bureau of Economic Analysis • Consumer Spending • -Bureau of Labor Statistics

  3. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Number of Establishments) 10,000 General medical and surgical hospitals 2,500 7,500 4,899 Furniture repair shops Movie theaters 5,000 = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  4. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Number of Establishments) 10,000 Men’s clothing stores Business, management, and computer training schools 8,840 Life insurance firms 5,000 2,500 7,500 4,899 = not-for-profit = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  5. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Number of Paid Workers) 200,000 100,000 150,000 54,000 50,000 Computer and office machine repair Public relations agencies Cable companies = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  6. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Number of Paid Workers) 200,000 100,000 150,000 127,648 54,000 Ambulance services Marketing consultancies Catering 50,000 = not-for-profit = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  7. U.S. Performing Arts Industry Coffee shops (Number of Paid Workers) Oil and gas pipeline construction 200,000 Advertising agencies 183,648 100,000 150,000 127,648 54,000 50,000 = not-for-profit = for-profit = self-employed Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  8. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Total Revenue of Organizations) $10 bil. $15 bil. $20 bil. $8 bil. Parking lots and garages Drycleaning and laundry services Cafeterias and buffets $5 bil. = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  9. U.S. Performing Arts Industry (Total Revenue of Organizations) Ambulatory surgical and emergency centers $10 bil. $15 bil. $20 bil. $13.6 bil. HR consulting services Direct mail advertising $5 bil. $8 bil. = not-for-profit = for-profit Source: U.S. Economic Census, 2007

  10. Not-for-Profit Performing Arts Industry Revenue by Source • Earned Income • Contributed Income • Individuals 21% • Foundations 8% • Business 6% • Government 4% • Other 2% • Other Income Total: $5.6 bil. Source: 2007 Economic Census, U.S. Census Bureau

  11. U.S. Consumer Spending on Admissions Sporting events $20.5 bil. Performing arts $14.5 bil. Car, van, and truck rentals ($11.4 bil.) Moving, storage, and freight delivery ($15.5 bil.) Parking fees and tolls ($15.6 bil.) Movie theaters $10.5 bil. Museums and libraries $6 bil. $5 bil. $9 bil. $13 bil. $17 bil. $21 bil. Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2009

  12. Value as Expressed by • Size of Industry, Workforce, Revenue • -United States Census Bureau • Consumer Spending • -Bureau of Economic Analysis • Consumer Spending • -Bureau of Labor Statistics

  13. Number of Americans Doing Selected Cultural Activities on an Average Day Movie attendance Sports attendance Arts/crafts activities Other arts and entertainment Performing arts attendance Museum visits 1 mil. 2 mil. 3 mil. 4 mil. Source: American Time Use Survey, 2003-2009

  14. Number of Americans Doing Selected Cultural Activities on an Average Day Movie attendance Sports attendance Arts/crafts activities 6.5 mil. did at least one activity Other arts and entertainment Performing arts attendance Museum visits 1 mil. 2 mil. 3 mil. 4 mil. Source: American Time Use Survey, 2003-2009

  15. WHEN DO THEY ATTEND? Percent of those who attend, by time of day Source: American Time Use Survey, 2003-2009

  16. WHERE DO THEY ATTEND? Performing Arts Attendees “Other” Arts and Entertainment Attendees Places of Worship 10% Schools 9% 36% 8% Outdoors, away from home 64% 65% 8% 4% Bars and restaurants Other Source: American Time Use Survey, 2003-2009

  17. TIME SPENT ON SELECTED CULTURAL ACTIVITIES How long? Source: AmericanTime Use Survey, 2003-2009

  18. TIME SPENT ON SELECTED CULTURAL ACTIVITIES With whom? Source: American Time Use Survey, 2003-2009

  19. Value as Expressed by • Social Capital • -Performing arts attendees are 3.5 times more likely than non-attendees to volunteer in their communities • -Regardless of education, gender, or age, performing arts attendance boosts the likelihood of volunteering by 25 percentage points • -1.6 million Americans volunteer primarily or secondarily with arts organizations, and 7.1 million provide “free artistic services” to non-arts groups (Source: Nichols et al., NEA Research Notes #94 and #95, 2007)

  20. Measures of Subjective Well-Being Happiness Surveys

  21. Happiness Surveys • Measuresof subjective well-being have recently gained credence • (Stiglitzand Sen) • Alan Krueger and the National Institute on Aging • (Scale of 0-6) • 4.3 happiness score for listening to music • 2.7 happiness score for doing homework • Special considerations for arts participation

  22. Other Models, Other Measures • Economic Impact Studies • (New spending, indirect spending/multipliers) • Contingent Valuation Studies • (Willingness to pay) • Hedonic Housing Price Models • (Proximity to arts and culture) • Cultural Asset Clusters • (Social and economic development)