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TCTW National Forum Technology Centers of the Future

TCTW National Forum Technology Centers of the Future

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TCTW National Forum Technology Centers of the Future

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  1. TCTW National ForumTechnology Centers of the Future Dr. Doug Major, Superintendent/CEO Implementing Smaller Learning Communities in the Technology Center

  2. Setting The Stage • 1963 – Tech Center campuses created through state legislation • Meridian Technology Center established in 1973 – first classes held in 1975 • Consolidation of resources to serve students from wide area, with a focus on high school juniors and seniors and adult students • Curriculum determined by input from business and industry professionals

  3. Meridian Technology Center Mission Providing customized education and training services for individuals, industries and communities.

  4. Oklahoma Technology Center System29 Districts, 56 Campuses

  5. Meridian Technology Center District 10 school districts 5 counties 900+ sq. miles

  6. Major Components of theMeridian Delivery System Juniors and Seniorsfrom District Partner Schools Full-Time Career Clusters AdultStudents Full-Time Career Clusters and Short-Term Courses Employees ofArea Companies Business and Industry Services

  7. Full-Time Training • 1 or 2 Years in Length • 1/2 Day (3 Hrs) or Full Day (6+ Hrs) • 804 FTE Students for FY09 • (FTE Student = 3-Hour Student) • Approximately 60% secondary/40% adult

  8. Full-TimeTraining 9 Cluster Areas • Architecture & Construction • Business Management & Administration • Finance • Health Science • Hospitality & Tourism • Human Services • Information Technology • Manufacturing • Transportation, Distribution and Logistics • 74 different Career Majors are available

  9. Full-TimeTraining (Available to Secondary and Adult Students) • Air Conditioning & Refrigeration • Automotive Technology • Biotechnology • Business Technology • Clinical Laboratory Technician • Collision Repair Technology • Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) • Cosmetology • Culinary Arts • Electrical Technology • Health Careers • Health Informatics Technology • Information Technology • Machine Tool / CNC • Manufacturing Technology • Masonry • Pharmacy Technician • Precision Metal Fabrication • Pre-Engineering Technology • Res. / Comm. Construction • Welding

  10. Full-TimeTraining (Available to Adult Students) • Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic • Practical Nursing • Radiologic Technology

  11. Short-Term Courses • Child Care Careers • Computer Certification • Computer Training Services • Medical • Transportation Technology • Online Education • Professional Development • Security Guard • Special Interest • Trade & Industry

  12. Business & IndustryServices • Computer Training Services • Management Services • Technical Skills & Training • Safety Training

  13. Enrollment Statistics (Short-Term and Business & Industry – FY08) • 1,456 classes conducted • 10,174 enrollments

  14. Center for Business Development • 45 companies to-date with 30 successfully graduating • 9 companies currently, employing 21 • $25 million in research grants &investment capital raised since 1999

  15. TCTW National Forum Goals • Learn why now is the most important time for the future of the shared-time center by being challenged to think beyond the current reality; • Discuss the various structures of technology centers to identify those that most closely relate to improved student performance; • Dialogue with others regarding successful, standards-based instruction in the CT centers that address technical, academic and 21st Century knowledge and skills; • Discuss strategies broadening the definition of rigor for instructional improvement and academic achievement; • Identify what academic integration really means in the CT classroom; and • Share in a variety of best practice sessions that relate to the Key Educational Practices embedded in the TCTW design.

  16. Why Change???

  17. To continue to succeed, we have to change the way we think about the past and the future.

  18. Nothing stops an organization faster than people who believe that the way they worked yesterday is the best way to work tomorrow. —Jon Madonna, Chairman, KPMG International

  19. Your business should be defined, not in terms of the product or service you offer, but in terms of what customer needs your product or service fulfills.

  20. In CareerTech We have to ask… • Who really are our customers today? • What are their wants, needs, and desires from CareerTech? • Will our current programs/services fully satisfy their needs? • How do we know? How do we measure our effectiveness?

  21. Mission Possible:Improving the PresentWhileCreating the Future

  22. Typical Product Curve Market Saturation Product/Service Development & Market Entry Value of Product/Service Declines or goes away Discover Need

  23. First Curve ImprovementGetting Better At What You Already Do • Streamlined processes • Questioning current reality • Strengthening ties with external stakeholders • Updating curriculum

  24. Old Improved

  25. Current Challenges • Budget • Changing Graduation Requirements • High Stakes Testing • Increased emphasis on accountability • DO NO HARM

  26. Who Are Our Customers? • Students • Tax Payers • Sending Schools • Employers • All of the Above

  27. Activity • At your table, identify 5 things that you think employers expect from CTE graduates and be prepared to share.

  28. Based upon employer expectations, how do we define student success? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Goal- work together to develop 8-10 “indicators of student success” that you will share with the larger group.

  29. How Do We Define Student Success? • Are success indicators: • Achievable for all? • Challenging? • Measurable? • What conditions must exist to ensure student success? • What should the school structure enable staff to do in order to ensure success?

  30. Discussion and Activity • List 1 • In your current environment, what do instructional leaders (principals, campus directors, etc.) actually do? • Estimate the % of time they spend in each area.

  31. Full-Time Programs Assistant Superintendent Curriculum Specialist Daytime Instructors David Barth, Pre-Engineering Technology Jared Bates, Biotechnician Jeana Bateson, Health Careers Cy Boles, Residential/Commercial Construction Donna Cantrell, Culinary Arts Carol Dvorak, Business Technology David Fleming, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Russell Frick, Computer Aided Drafting Sonja Gentry, Health Careers John Gibson, Precision Metal Fabrication Nikki Gripe, Health Careers Carol Herring, Algebra II Matthew Jones, Information Technology Tim Ketch, Electrical Technology Carolyn LeGrand, Culinary Arts Deanna Little, Ken McBride, Information Technology Darrel Negelein, Pre-Engineering Patricia Neiman, Health Informatics Technology Sue Ann Paine, Cosmetology Bret Pickens, Masonry Lawanta Ramsey, Information Technology David Shields, Automotive Technology Shelly Smith, Automotive Technology Joe Steele, Welding Technology Jeff Stewart, Pharmacy Technician Instructor Jerri Taulman, Health Careers Heather West, Educational Enhancement Center Jimmy Williams, Machine Tool Steve Young, Collision Repair Technology Director, Full-time Programs Full-Time Adult Program Instructors Dolores Cotton, Practical Nursing Sue Dearinger, Cosmetology Darlene Dewitt, Practical Nursing Dustin Hicks, Practical Nursing Charlotte Prewitt, Practical Nursing Carol Shuler, Radiologic Technology Rena Vandament, Practical Nursing Tanya Vasso, Radiologic Technology Emily Wheeler, Radiologic Technology Support Team Tammy Baker Gayla Bates Laurel Ellis Instructional Assistants Blanca Correa, Culinary Arts Assist. Jill Grumbles, Culinary Arts Assist. Kathryn Metcalf, Culinary Arts Assist. Shelly Wrede, Culinary Arts Assist. Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist. Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist.

  32. Discussion and Activity • Make Two Lists • What activities should an instructional leader do to contribute to student success? • What activities should an instructional leader do to contribute to teacher success?

  33. Thermometer Thermostat OR Reactive Proactive

  34. July 1, 2009 Instructional Assistants Jill Grumbles, Culinary Arts Assist. Kathryn Metcalf, Culinary Arts Assist. Joe Moore, Culinary Arts Production Manager Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist. Shelly Wrede, Culinary Arts Assist. Steve Little, Instructional Assistant Full-Time Programs Support Team Tammy Baker Shelly Gallaway Laurel Ellis Assistant Superintendent Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Carol Herring, Algebra II Heather West, Educational Enhancement Center David Barth, Pre-Engineering Donna Cantrell, Culinary Arts Sue Dearinger, Cosmetology Carol Dvorak, Business Technology Matthew Jones, Information Technology Carolyn LeGrand, Culinary Arts Ken McBride, Information Technology Darrel Negelein, Pre-Engineering Patricia Neiman, Health Informatics Sue Paine, Cosmetology Lawanta Ramsey, Information Technology Cy Boles, Residential Construction Dave Fleming, Air Conditioning Russell Frick, Computer Aided Drafting John Gibson, Precision Metal Fabrication Tim Ketch, Electrical Technology Bret Pickens, Masonry David Shields, Automotive Technology Shelly Smith, Automotive Technology Joe Steele, Welding Technology Jimmy Williams, Machine Tool Steve Young, Collision Repair Jared Bates, Biotechnology Jeana Bateson, Health Careers Dolores Cotton, Practical Nursing Darlene Dewitt, Practical Nursing Sonja Gentry, Health Careers Nikki Gripe, Clinical Lab Assistant Dustin Hicks, Practical Nursing Charlotte Prewitt, Practical Nursing Carol Shuler, Radiologic Technology Jeff Stewart, Pharmacy Technician Jerri Taulman, Health Careers Rena Vandament, Practical Nursing Tanya Vasso, Radiologic Technology Emily Wheeler, Radiologic Technology

  35. Full-Time Programs Assistant Superintendent Curriculum Specialist Daytime Instructors David Barth, Pre-Engineering Technology Jared Bates, Biotechnician Jeana Bateson, Health Careers Cy Boles, Residential/Commercial Construction Donna Cantrell, Culinary Arts Carol Dvorak, Business Technology David Fleming, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Russell Frick, Computer Aided Drafting Sonja Gentry, Health Careers John Gibson, Precision Metal Fabrication Nikki Gripe, Health Careers Carol Herring, Algebra II Matthew Jones, Information Technology Tim Ketch, Electrical Technology Carolyn LeGrand, Culinary Arts Deanna Little, Ken McBride, Information Technology Darrel Negelein, Pre-Engineering Patricia Neiman, Health Informatics Technology Sue Ann Paine, Cosmetology Bret Pickens, Masonry Lawanta Ramsey, Information Technology David Shields, Automotive Technology Shelly Smith, Automotive Technology Joe Steele, Welding Technology Jeff Stewart, Pharmacy Technician Instructor Jerri Taulman, Health Careers Heather West, Educational Enhancement Center Jimmy Williams, Machine Tool Steve Young, Collision Repair Technology Director, Full-time Programs Full-Time Adult Program Instructors Dolores Cotton, Practical Nursing Sue Dearinger, Cosmetology Darlene Dewitt, Practical Nursing Dustin Hicks, Practical Nursing Charlotte Prewitt, Practical Nursing Carol Shuler, Radiologic Technology Rena Vandament, Practical Nursing Tanya Vasso, Radiologic Technology Emily Wheeler, Radiologic Technology Support Team Tammy Baker Gayla Bates Laurel Ellis Instructional Assistants Blanca Correa, Culinary Arts Assist. Jill Grumbles, Culinary Arts Assist. Kathryn Metcalf, Culinary Arts Assist. Shelly Wrede, Culinary Arts Assist. Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist. Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist.

  36. July 1, 2009 Instructional Assistants Jill Grumbles, Culinary Arts Assist. Kathryn Metcalf, Culinary Arts Assist. Joe Moore, Culinary Arts Production Manager Open Position, Culinary Arts Assist. Shelly Wrede, Culinary Arts Assist. Steve Little, Instructional Assistant Full-Time Programs Support Team Tammy Baker Shelly Gallaway Laurel Ellis Assistant Superintendent Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Director, Instruction Carol Herring, Algebra II Heather West, Educational Enhancement Center David Barth, Pre-Engineering Donna Cantrell, Culinary Arts Sue Dearinger, Cosmetology Carol Dvorak, Business Technology Matthew Jones, Information Technology Carolyn LeGrand, Culinary Arts Ken McBride, Information Technology Darrel Negelein, Pre-Engineering Patricia Neiman, Health Informatics Sue Paine, Cosmetology Lawanta Ramsey, Information Technology Cy Boles, Residential Construction Dave Fleming, Air Conditioning Russell Frick, Computer Aided Drafting John Gibson, Precision Metal Fabrication Tim Ketch, Electrical Technology Bret Pickens, Masonry David Shields, Automotive Technology Shelly Smith, Automotive Technology Joe Steele, Welding Technology Jimmy Williams, Machine Tool Steve Young, Collision Repair Jared Bates, Biotechnology Jeana Bateson, Health Careers Dolores Cotton, Practical Nursing Darlene Dewitt, Practical Nursing Sonja Gentry, Health Careers Nikki Gripe, Clinical Lab Assistant Dustin Hicks, Practical Nursing Charlotte Prewitt, Practical Nursing Carol Shuler, Radiologic Technology Jeff Stewart, Pharmacy Technician Jerri Taulman, Health Careers Rena Vandament, Practical Nursing Tanya Vasso, Radiologic Technology Emily Wheeler, Radiologic Technology

  37. Expectations of Instructional Directors • Be in classrooms often • Know all students on a first name basis • Monitor student plans of study • Monitor student progress reports (including attendance) • Act as a liaison with sending schools and parents • Coach rather than evaluate • Anticipate and minimize potential behavioral issues • Plan and coordinate relevant professional development • Assist instructors with curriculum and business and education council issues

  38. Is it working??? Administrator… “Under the previous system, I was rarely visited by administrators as a teacher and my students rarely had any interaction [with administrators]. My performance evaluations were a check-off of dots and I rarely gained any suggestions from my supervisor. Being an administrator now, I understand that little things come up—daily—which require immediate attention and the in-box never ends. It would have been difficult to be highly effective and implement new things under the previous structure. Under the new structure, we are spending more time in programs, providing assistance to instructors and providing students with another caring adult and making campus feel “smaller”-more student focused.”

  39. Is it working??? Instructor… “I have noticed the students seem more comfortable when [instructional director] comes to the program than in the past. I guess there is not something wrong when she comes down.” “I have not had as many discipline problems this year. I think they [students] are happier.”

  40. Is it working??? Instructor… “I think students are a little more relaxed, in a good way. Staff has been friendly, having [instructional director] coming in speaking to students for no reason is a good thing.” It has given me some comfort to know that there is someone to help and encourage. I think it is to the benefit of the instructor for support not just when something goes poorly, this will let me share my weaknesses so I can find the right direction to strengthen those weak areas. [Instructional director] is planning on helping me with those areas.”

  41. Is it working??? Instructor… “Students do not feel intimidated when [instructional director] comes down to the program because they understand the reason for her to be in the program. We talked to the students about this on the first day of class and the students understand she is here for positive things like good communication between her, the students, the instructors, and the program. THIS IS HOW WE FEEL AND HOW THE STUDENTS FEEL. How do we know? Because we asked the students.” “We have had fewer behavioral issues and student attitudes have been better. Overall communication has been better, not that it was bad before, it has just improved.”

  42. Is it working??? Instructor… “The overall school climate has been more positive. I have had very few student issues this year.” “The overall school climate seems to be more organized which helps instructors. The communication of information to instructors is still a work in progress and could be improved. The career planning center seems to be more responsive to assisting us with our special students’ needs.”

  43. Is it working??? Instructor… “I have not seen a lot of change. [Instructional director] did cover my class one day while I was at a conference. She used it to get to know the students better. That is about the only difference.” “It may be too early to tell. There was a lot of focus on the 5-year review last semester. I like the concept, it just may take a bit longer to get the road paved.”

  44. Is it working??? Administrator… “Having a smaller number of teachers to supervise allows for more time to assist/coach each teacher.” “Smaller numbers allow the administrator to have a greater depth of understanding of curriculum in each program.” “Shared responsibilities with other directors of instruction allow for greater flexibility to deal with unexpected issues that arise.” “Stronger team that capitalizes on the various strengths of each director of instruction.” “We need to continue working on communication among and between the smaller learning community groups and other staff.”

  45. Is it working??? Administrator… “It has been encouraging to see students “light up” whenever staff members call them by name. I noticed right before Christmas break that many students came to the Health Occupations counter to give the support staff cards—or wish them a happy holiday. This did not occur last year.” “Students know they have other adults to talk to—they are becoming aware of the fact that their classroom is not an ‘island’ at MTC—others besides their instructors know them, ask about their studies, etc. They appear to be more comfortable with their surroundings—as if the atmosphere and hallways aren’t as cold.”

  46. Is it working??? Administrator… “I enjoy visiting with them [the students]—but what is really exciting is when they see me and speak first—excitedly about something…’Mrs. Hines! I made a B on my test!’ Last year we would have passed in the hallway with a polite “hello” being the only thing said.” “One of the things I have noticed is the ease in which instructors walk into each other’s classroom and visit, share information, etc. Last year there appeared to be “lines” drawn and they were hesitant to cross over into another’s turf.”

  47. Is it working??? Instructor… “Personally, it has had a positive impact. [Instructional director] has been able to assist me and support me in ways that she did not have time to do in the past. I believe she has a better idea as to what all is done in the program than she was ever able to have known about it in the past. She does have time now.”

  48. Is it working??? New Instructor… “Since I was not here before the change I may not have the perspectives others have, but I will make some comments comparing this year to my previous years at [another tech center]. The students have seen [instructional director] in class more than my former classes had ever seen administrators. I think they have a better understanding that there is an administrator there to make sure we have what we need as a program.”

  49. Is it working??? New Instructor… “At other schools I have been at each one of the administrators have been in charge of every program. Different levels (assistant director, directors, etc.) of administration made different decisions, but all of them were involved with every program. By having someone involved with fewer programs, I believe it gives them the ability to know those programs better and therefore make better decisions.” “Before this year I had not heard of learning communities, but it seems to work well.”

  50. Is it working??? Instructor… “I have noticed an increase in the availability of my instructional leader which in turn increases my productivity as well as my job satisfaction.  I feel like my instructional leader has a solid understanding of what I do in my program.”  “My students know who their ‘principal’ is and that she is interested in their success.  I think that gives them more encouragement to succeed.”