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kresha warnock m a co director ball state child study center muncie in kwarnock@bsu edu n.
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Including Children with Food Allergies in Our Early Childhood Classrooms PowerPoint Presentation
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Including Children with Food Allergies in Our Early Childhood Classrooms

Including Children with Food Allergies in Our Early Childhood Classrooms

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Including Children with Food Allergies in Our Early Childhood Classrooms

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  1. Kresha Warnock, M.A. Co-Director, Ball State Child Study Center Muncie, IN kwarnock@bsu.edu Including Children with Food Allergies in Our Early Childhood Classrooms

  2. Intro Determining food allergies in young children Some facts and definitions What is anaphylaxis? Story of Ella Creating our policies – NAEYC Guidelines, etc. The Visionary Director and Food Allergies Outline

  3. About 5% of children; 4% of adults and teens has a food allergy An allergic reaction occurs when “the immune system of allergic children over-reacts to substances that are normally quite harmless.” Some facts and definitions…

  4. Atopic Dermatitis – Eczema Hay Fever Asthma What is Atopy?

  5. Skin: itching, hives, redness, swelling • Nose: sneezing, stuffy nose, runny nose • Mouth: itching, swelling of lips or tongue • Throat: itching, tightness, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness • Chest: shortness of breath, cough, wheeze, chest pain, tightness • Heart: weak pulse, passing out, shock • Gut: vomiting, diarrhea, cramps Symptoms of Anaphylaxis?

  6. Ella’s first day of school

  7. Food Allergens: • Most common (responsible for 90% of food allergies): • Milk • Eggs • Peanuts • Tree nuts • Wheat • Soy • Fish • Shellfish Most Common Food Allergens

  8. provided medicines, instructions, and physician’s documentation • suggested food items/brands • Gave list of common “extra” names for foods • kept school informed and updated of allergy events elsewhere and any new medical information • provided medicines, instructions, and physician’s documentation • shared the family’s goals, concerns, etc. • gave permission to share information with other parents, as well as with all staff Family

  9. served the planned menu as approved by parent (NO variations) • had knowledge and awareness of signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction • informed and reminded other adults in the classroom (college students, volunteers, subs, parents) of allergy, being sure each one could identify the child with the allergy • talked with other children in a developmentally appropriate way about food allergies • carried emergency medicines and contact information on all field trips and outings • observed, assessed, and shared child’s progress in all areas of development Teacher

  10. planned menu • kept track of medication and paperwork • trained or provided training for staff • built trusting and supportive relationship with parents • built trusting and supportive relationship with teachers • provided other parents with relevant allergy information including suggestions for special treats, etc. • coordinated formal meetings between parents and teachers, including an initial meeting to formulate an allergy action plan • assured child was able to fully participate in and was fully integrated into the preschool program Administrator

  11. 5.B.05a For each child with special health care needs or food allergies or special nutrition needs, the child’s health care provider gives the program an individualized care plan that is prepared in consultation with family members and specialists involved in the child’s care. 5.b.05b The program protects children with food allergies from contact with the problem food. The program asks families of a child with food allergies to give consent for posting information about that child’s food allergy and, if consent is given, then posts information in the food preparation area and in the areas of the facility the child uses so it is a visual reminder to all those who interact with the child during the program day. NAEYC Guidelines

  12. …This criterion refers specifically to children with diagnosed food allergies or special nutritional needs because of medical conditions. A program may choose to honor family preferences regarding food (for example, vegetarian or kosher diet) in the absence of a diagnosed food allergy or medical condition without obtaining an individualized care plan by the physician as long as the request conforms with the nutritional guidelines of the US Department of Agriculture’s Child and Adult Care Food Program. NAEYC CAVEAT (5.B.05)

  13. Manager/Overseer… Mentor/Coach Community Builder!! The Visionary Director and Food Allergies

  14. To whom is it directed? Do you require health care provider’s approval? Where is food prepared? Where is food served? What are your limitations? Developing an allergy policy