Download
why my students don t plagiarise a case study n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WHY MY STUDENTS DON’T PLAGIARISE: A CASE STUDY PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WHY MY STUDENTS DON’T PLAGIARISE: A CASE STUDY

WHY MY STUDENTS DON’T PLAGIARISE: A CASE STUDY

98 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

WHY MY STUDENTS DON’T PLAGIARISE: A CASE STUDY

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. WHY MY STUDENTS DON’T PLAGIARISE: A CASE STUDY George MacDonald Ross Director, PRS Subject Centre University of Leeds, 09.01.09

  2. Programme • Evidence that my students don’t plagiarise • Designing plagiarism out • Discussion University of Leeds

  3. Evidence • Evidence that my students don’t plagiarise (apart from 2 out of 350): • Turnitin • Anonymous questionnaire • Long experience of assessment, and professional interest in plagiarism • Talking with students University of Leeds

  4. Designing it out (1) Don’t give students the idea that HE is about memorising and reproducing facts: • Don’t lecture (instead: seminars, group work, projects) • Don’t set unseen exams • Focus on intellectual skills (problem solving, criticism, argumentation) • Make students show their working (as in maths) University of Leeds

  5. Designing it out (2) Assessment: • Set tasks that can’t be solved by copying from the internet. . . • . . . or from course handouts • Set clear assessment criteria, including demonstration of skills • Discuss work with students (even negotiate marks) • Celebrate diversity rather than singing from same hymn-sheet • Don’t provide model answers University of Leeds

  6. Designing it out (3) Tell students that all sources must be acknowledged and evaluated: • Course handouts are secondary sources • Anything said in class is a secondary source • Get students to publish minutes of seminars University of Leeds

  7. Designing it out (4) Personalise teaching and assessment (people are much less likely to cheat those they know): • Give students brief individual tutorials • Learn and use students’ names • Avoid titles (you are mainly helping them learn rather than judging them) • Don’t mark coursework anonymously University of Leeds

  8. Designing it out (5) Foster a culture of learning for its own sake: • De-emphasise grading • De-emphasise detection and punishment • (But do use Turnitin unostentatiously) • Don’t give the message that plagiarism is a naughty good to be desired University of Leeds

  9. Designing it out (6) Some tips: • Require literary forms not on the internet (e.g. dialogue) • Provide materials unique to your module • Set tasks that are achievable University of Leeds

  10. Conclusion • No magic bullet • Plagiarism-free teaching is just good teaching • Detection and punishment are not a solution • But for some teachers, a major culture shift is needed University of Leeds

  11. Further resources My plagiarism webpages are at: http://www.philosophy.leeds.ac.uk/GMR/teachingepubs/plagiarism/plagindex.html Published version: Plagiary 2008 3(5): http://www.plagiary.org University of Leeds

  12. Thank you for participating George MacDonald Ross Department of Philosophy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK g.m.ross@leeds.ac.uk http://prs.heacademy.ac.uk University of Leeds