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Where are we?

Where are we?

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Where are we?

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  1. Where are we? • Time of unprecedented growth • Fiscal pressure are extraordinary • Political involvement is increasing • Community involvement and concern are increasing

  2. Hot Ticket Issues…. • Expectation of exceptional “Leadership” and depth of knowledge • Increased focus on Jails for solutions • Budget and fiscal matters will become even more difficult • Reentry will be required in every local system • Staffing and retention • Push to be data driven • Length of stay can no longer be an excuse to not attempt to program • Privatization and vendor issues are becoming more complicated • More involvement by the courts • Keep separate/gang issues

  3. Traditional ways we look to fill budget gaps won’t begin to get us there • Federal revenue is going to be harder to come by • Reallocation to the inmates families is only going to take you so far • Phone revenues are at the tipping point and beyond • Commissary revenues are in the same condition Go too far, legal problems!

  4. What I’ve heard in the past two days…..(AJA Conference 2010) • I cut 124 officers Christmas eve • I was directed to reduce the budget 33% • I have cut 5.3 million in the last 12 months. It just keeps coming • All my programs are gone. Inmates are watching TV and staff are waiting for the next fight. • I’m charging inmates for everything and collecting nothing

  5. What skill do you believe is most important for you to have moving forward? Strategic Thinking Ability to recognize relationships, complexities, implications of situations, anticipate possibilities and plan what to do. An attempt to formulate a best guess about the future.

  6. Correctional Fact Sheet Bureau of Justice Statistics Council of Governments

  7. Jail Facilities in the United States • At midyear 2008, 785,556 inmates were held in the nation's local jails, up from 780,174 at midyear 2007 • June 2009, 2.3 % decline (17,936) first decline since 1982 • In 2008, jails reported adding 14,911 beds during the previous 12 months, bringing the total rated capacity to 828,413 2009 we added another 2.6 % to 849,544 • 95% of the rated capacity was occupied at midyear 2008 • 2009, 90.4 % of space occupied

  8. June 2009, we supervised 70,000 inmates outside the walls • 11,800 on electronic monitoring • 11,200 serving weekends • 17,700 Alternative community labor • 12,400 Pretrial release

  9. Populations are more violent and transitional • 87.1% are males, 43% are white males, 39% are black males and 16% are Hispanic • 1100 jails of 3300 have fewer than 50 open beds! • 50% are held for a violent or a drug offense • 46% are on probation or parole upon re-admission • 1 of every 133 US residents in in jail or prison at mid-year 2007 • ICE detainees increased from 19, 528 to 27,634 in 2006 or by 41.3% • 50 jurisdictions house 29.5% of all jail inmates! • 6% of jurisdictions house an ADP of 1000 or more (173 jail systems)

  10. Special needs of inmates remain challenge for jail management • A third report regular use of cocaine/crack; 1 in 8 heroin or other opiates • 47% of women and 13% of men report past physical/sexual abuse • 16% history of mental illness; 10% of males and 16% of females received services • A third report having medical problem needing medical attention since admission

  11. Other challenges……... • 14% of jail inmates reported being homeless, living in shelter or on street in last year • 29% of inmates unemployed; 18% only occasional employment • 46% report a family member ever incarcerated; 31% a brother;19% a father • 31% report parent abusing alcohol/drugs will growing up • 44% from single parent household; 13% from households missing both parents

  12. June 30th, 2002 the incarcerated population in the U.S. reached 2 million for the first time in history • June 30th 2006 2,245,189 • Largest increase in incarceration since 1999 • 84% or 205,958 of that growth was in State facilities

  13. Over 10,000 incarcerated in adult facilities were juveniles • June 30th, 2006 Juvenile incarceration has decreased by almost 20% • Privately operated facilities were down 6.1% • June 30th, 2006 privatization is up 20% (primarily in State and Federal systems) • Female population rose at a faster rate than male inmates • June 30th, 2006 This trend continues

  14. RealitiesWhere Are We Now? How are we doing? • Mid-Year 2002 - 2 Million incarcerated (Beck, 2002 - U.S. Dept. of Justice) • Sanctions Overall (Probation, Parole, Jail, Prison) • 1,842,100 (1980) • 6,467,200 (2001) • 7,000,000 + (2008) • 7,600,000 (2010)

  15. PrisonerRecidivism • within 3 years of release: • 67.5% were rearrested • 46.9% were reconvicted • 51.8% returned to prison • Within our jails: • Over 90% of the population will transition directly to our local streets • 80% of those who recidivate will do so within 6 months post-release • Average recidivism rates range from 50% - 70% of the overall population (dependant on measure and crime type)

  16. RealitiesSystem Costs • Hard Costs – 38 Billion per year (1996) – approaching $100 Million per day • 46 Billion + per year (2008) • 47.5 Billion (2010) • Soft Costs – Societal, Quality of Life? • What is the “cost” of one felony? • 80% of incarceration relates to substance or alcohol abuse(Belanko, et al.; US Dept. of Justice; National Institute of Corrections)

  17. Local jails often ignored in policy discussions, yet process more than 12 million admissions annually (2007) June 2009, estimated at 12.8 million • Jails serve a variety functions and provide an array of services related to successful reentry • Point of entry into criminal justice system but also point of release and return • On any one day, half of the Nation’s jail population is the consequence of failure under community supervision • 34% on probation;13% on parole;7% out on bail/bond; 2% other release • In 2004 approximately 219,000 parolees and 330,000 probationers failed and were incarcerated

  18. Rise in unconvicted jail inmates accounts for more than two-thirds of growth

  19. Nationwide, corrections spending ranks fourth in eating up state budget dollars, trailing only health care, education, and transportation……. According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, five states -- Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, Oregon and Vermont -- spend more on prisons they than do on schools.

  20. Where the funding is Distributed

  21. Regionalization • Collaborative Outsourcing with the State and County Governments for unified purchases in: • Food Services • Medical Care • Pharmacy Costs • Fuel Purchases • Vehicle Purchases • Fleet Maintenance • Uniform Suppliers • Paper Goods • Building Maintenance

  22. Some Other Things to Think About • Vegetarian Meals instead of Muslim or Religious Diets • Commissary Fees and services • In-unit vending machines • Fingerprinting Fees • Bond Processing Fees • DNA Sampling Fees • Disciplinary Assessments • Credit Card Fees • ATM Machines • Pay-Pal transaction fees • Phone Cards • Urine Screening • Photocopying • Notary Services

  23. Who’s Watching…. • Justice Dept • ACLU • Community Activists • PREA Commission • Courts • Health Dept • Fire Marshall