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Bacterial pneumonia Community acquired

Bacterial pneumonia Community acquired

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Bacterial pneumonia Community acquired

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  1. Bacterial pneumoniaCommunity acquired Amy Montalvo Desiree Mora Ashley Camacho Simeon davis

  2. What is it? • An infection in one or both lungs • Causes the lung’s air sac (alveoli) to become inflamed and engorged with pus, fluid, and cellular debris • Makes it difficult for the body to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide

  3. Etiology • Caused by a pathogenic infection of the lungs • Etiologic agent: Haemphilus influenza, klebsiella, staphylococcus • Klebsiella Pneumonia -Gram negative • Streptococcus pneumonia- Gram positive

  4. Epidemiology • Pneumonia is ranked as the 8th leading cause of death in the United States • Elderly (65 years or older) are considered to be in high rick of obtaining pneumonia • Anyone who has a weak immune system is also in high risk • Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia acquired outside of hospitals • It is estimated that 175,000 occur each year, with a fatality rate of 5-7%, or much higher for the elderly • 75 % of acute cases • Evidence indicates that the rate of infection ranges from 74 to 92 per 1,000 children younger than 2 years

  5. Mode of transmission • Breathing in infected air particles • Generally occurs after an upper respiratory infection • For example after a flu virus • Bacteria living in your nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread to your lungs

  6. Symptoms • Cough • Usually mucus from the lungs (maybe rusty, green, or tinged) • Fever • Fast breathing and feeling short of breath • Shaking • Teeth shattering • Nausea and vomiting • Fast heart beat • Chest pain • Diarrhea

  7. Diagnostic tests • Listen for abnormal chest sounds that indicate heavy mucus secretion • Take a blood sample to get a white blood cell count. A high count usually indicates infection • Take blood and/or mucus samples to identify the infection causing-pathogen • Order chest x-rays to confirm the presence and extent of infection

  8. Treatment • Doctors use antibiotics to treat pneumonia caused by bacteria, the most common cause of the condition. • Antibiotics have a high cure rate for pneumonia • Antibiotics are chosen based on age, symptoms and how severe they are • A cough medicine to calm the cough • Fever medication to reduce the temperature

  9. Prevention/ Control measures • There are several vaccines that prevent infection by bacteria that may cause pneumonia vaccines • Pneumococcal • Haemophilus influenza type b • Pertussis (whooping cough) • Varicella (chicken pox) • Measles and influenza • Good hygiene practices • Limiting the exposure of cigarette smoke can reduce the risk • Treating and preventing chronic diseases such as heart disease or diabetes

  10. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOEPXsDUB24

  11. References • Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: A Primer for Pharmacists. (2013, July 1). <i>USPharmacist.com > Continuing Education > Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: A Primer for Pharmacists</i>. Retrieved May 7, 2014, from http://www.uspharmacist.com/continuing_education/ceviewtest/lessonid/109254/ • Pneumonia Fact Sheet - American Lung Association. (n.d.). <i>American Lung Association</i>. Retrieved May 1, 2014, from http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/influenza/in-depth-resources/pneumonia-fact-sheet.html • Pneumonia Symptoms, Causes, Treatments & More. (2013, March 6). <i>WebMD</i>. Retrieved May 1, 2014, from http://www.webmd.com/lung/tc/pneumonia-topic-overview • The Coughing Child and Pneumonia. (2013, February 26). <i>YouTube</i>. Retrieved May 7, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOEPXsDUB24