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The Word Is Alive 1 John

The Word Is Alive 1 John

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The Word Is Alive 1 John

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  1. The Word Is Alive1 John Introduction Narrated by Tony Gillon

  2. Author • The author is the same as John’s Gospel.

  3. Author • The author is the same as John’s Gospel. • Based on writing style and vocabulary.

  4. Author • The author is the same as John’s Gospel. • Based on writing style and vocabulary. • For everyone born of God overcomes the world. This is the victory that has overcome the world, even our faith. • (1 John 5:4).

  5. Author • The author is the same as John’s Gospel. • Based on writing style and vocabulary. • The major themes and emphases of the writings overlap.

  6. Author • The author is the same as John’s Gospel. • Based on writing style and vocabulary. • The major themes and emphases of the writings overlap. • His Gospel does not mentioned John by name.

  7. Author • His Gospel does not mentioned John by name. • One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him (John 13:23).

  8. Author • His Gospel does not mentioned John by name. • One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him (John 13:23). • Other proposals are unconvincing.

  9. Author • His Gospel does not mentioned John by name. • One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him (John 13:23). • Other proposals are unconvincing. • John was an eye-witness of the crucifixion

  10. Author • When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to his mother, “Dear woman, here is your son,” and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home (John 19:26–27).

  11. Author • John witnessed the empty tomb: • Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance. So she came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one Jesus loved, and said, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we don’t know where they have put him!” (Continued).

  12. Author • So Peter and the other disciple started for the tomb. Both were running, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent over and looked in at the strips of linen lying there but did not go in. Then Simon Peter, who was behind him, arrived and went into the tomb. (Continued).

  13. Author • He saw the strips of linen lying there, as well as the burial cloth that had been around Jesus’ head. The cloth was folded up by itself, separate from the linen. Finally the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went inside. He saw and believed. (They still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead). • (John 20:1–10).

  14. Author • John had several encounters with Jesus after his resurrection.

  15. Author • John had several encounters with Jesus after his resurrection. • John was ideally placed to write about Jesus as the Christ.

  16. Date • At the time of writing John was the only apostle still living.

  17. Date • At the time of writing John was the only apostle still living. • Jesus answered, “If I want him to remain alive until I return, what is that to you? You must follow me” (John 21:22).

  18. Date • At the time of writing John was the only apostle still living. • Jesus answered, “If I want him to remain alive until I return, what is that to you? You must follow me” (John 21:22). • The letter was probably written AD85-90.

  19. Date • At the time of writing John was the only apostle still living. • Jesus answered, “If I want him to remain alive until I return, what is that to you? You must follow me” (John 21:22). • The letter was probably written AD85-90. • It was written near to Ephesus and was probably read by churches in Asia.

  20. Theme • The three basics of Christian life.God is light (1 John 1:5b).

  21. Theme • The three basics of Christian life.God is light (1 John 1:5b). • But every spirit that does not acknowledge Jesus is not from God. This is the spirit of the antichrist, which you have heard is coming and even now is already in the world (1 John 4:3).

  22. Theme • I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life.(1 John 5:13).

  23. Purpose of 1 John • All three letters written as a packet. • 3 John was personal for Gaius. • 2 John was for Gaius’ church. • 1 John was a sermon for general distribution in the Province of Asia.

  24. Purpose of 1 John • Written to counter an early form of Gnosticism, which is Greek gnōsis and is salvation based on esoteric knowledge. • It can neither be proven nor ruled out that John had this or a similar movement in mind as he wrote.

  25. Purpose of 1 John • False teachers: • As I urged you when I went into Macedonia, stay there in Ephesus so that you may command certain men not to teach false doctrines any longer (1 Timothy 1:3).

  26. Purpose of 1 John • But there were also false prophets among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you. They will secretly introduce destructive heresies, even denying the sovereign Lord who bought them — bringing swift destruction on themselves (2 Peter 2:1)

  27. Purpose of 1 John • For certain men whose condemnation was written about long ago have secretly slipped in among you. They are godless men, who change the grace of our God into a license for immorality and deny Jesus Christ our only Sovereign and Lord (Jude 4).

  28. Purpose of 1 John • For certain men whose condemnation was written about long ago have secretly slipped in among you. They are godless men, who change the grace of our God into a license for immorality and deny Jesus Christ our only Sovereign and Lord(Jude 4).

  29. Purpose of 1 John • They went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us (1 John 2:19).

  30. Purpose of 1 John • John is neither anti-Gnostic nor anti-schismatic.

  31. Purpose of 1 John • John is neither anti-Gnostic nor anti-schismatic. • The letter is a manifesto of ‘Done!’ It is finished (John 19:30b). The Word of life (1 John 1:1e).

  32. Purpose of 1 John • Yet I am writing you a new command; its truth is seen in him and you, because the darkness is passing and the true light is already shining (1 John 2:8).

  33. Purpose of 1 John • Yet I am writing you a new command; its truth is seen in him and you, because the darkness is passing and the true light is already shining (1 John 2:8). • The world and its desires pass away, but the man who does the will of God lives forever. (1 John 2:17).

  34. Purpose of 1 John • God’s will is for John’s readers to receive the saving message of Christ’s coming, rejoice in the commands of Christ’s teaching, and revel in the love of the Father as it continually translates into Christian love for one another and its ministry to the world.

  35. Purpose of 1 John • God’s will is for John’s readers to receive the saving message of Christ’s coming, rejoice in the commands of Christ’s teaching, and revel in the love of the Father as it continually translates into Christian love for one another and its ministry to the world. • Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth. • (1 John 3:18).

  36. Summary of Salvation History • Christians are to live in love, as Christ loved us.

  37. Writing Style • It does not follow the conventions of a NT letter.

  38. Writing Style • It does not follow the conventions of a NT letter. • We write this to make our joy complete. (1 John 1:4).

  39. Writing Style • It does not follow the conventions of a NT letter. • We write this to make our joy complete. (1 John 1:4). • Irenæus, Dionysius of Alexandria, and Eusebius all accepted it as a letter.

  40. Writing Style • John rarely sustains a clear line of argument.

  41. Writing Style • John rarely sustains a clear line of argument. • The content is rich in doctrinal substance, ethical challenge, and devotional fervour.

  42. Writing Style • John rarely sustains a clear line of argument. • The content is rich in doctrinal substance, ethical challenge, and devotional fervour. • It would be more accurate to call this book a treatise or pamphlet.

  43. Writing Style • The author keeps coming back to topics that have been introduced earlier.

  44. Writing Style • The author keeps coming back to topics that have been introduced earlier. • Subordinate themes are Christology, doctrine about the person and work of Christ; walking in the light; love; and the need to reject fallen, worldly culture.

  45. Writing Style • The author keeps coming back to topics that have been introduced earlier. • Subordinate themes are Christology, doctrine about the person and work of Christ; walking in the light; love; and the need to reject fallen, worldly culture. • There is an incipient poetry and mysticism about John’s writing.

  46. Key Themes • God incarnate.

  47. Key Themes • God incarnate. • All humans are sinful.

  48. Key Themes • God incarnate. • All humans are sinful. • Christ – the believer’s advocate.

  49. Key Themes • God incarnate. • All humans are sinful. • Christ – the believer’s advocate. • Christians should forsake sin.

  50. Key Themes • God incarnate. • All humans are sinful. • Christ – the believer’s advocate. • Christians should forsake sin. • To deny Christ is to deny God.