Federalists v. Anti-Federalists - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Federalists v. Anti-Federalists

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  1. Federalists v. Anti-Federalists 12.11.13

  2. SWBAT to support the Federalist or Anti-Federalist point of view by participating in a mini-debate. Materials Homework Write a reflection paragraph in your NBabout today’s debates. Was there something you wanted to say that you didn’t get a chance to? Was there something someone said that you agree/disagree with? How did you think it would have felt to be a delegate debating these topics? • NB • Pencil • Index card

  3. Do Now • What are the three branches of government? • What is the job of each branch?

  4. Federalist v. Anti-Federalist James Madison Thomas Jefferson

  5. Complete the Venn Diagram in your NB: Write the word that fits with the correct category: Feared a strong central government Thought the Constitution was enough to protect citizens’ rights. Agreed to the Bill of Rights as a compromise. Worried a list of rights might be seen as the ONLY rights people had. Thought the Constitution needed a list of protected rights. Opposed the Constitution as is. Believed citizens had rights that should be protected. Wanted the Constitution to be approved as is. Believed in American independence and freedom. Federalist Anti-Federalist

  6. Choose a side • On an index card: • Are you a federalist or an Anti-Federalist? • What does it mean to be a Federalist or an Anti- Federalist? • Why are you a Federalist or an Anti-Federalist? • Have 3 facts to support your opinion

  7. Topics • Feared a strong central government • Thought the Constitution was enough to protect citizens’ rights. • Agreed to the Bill of Rights as a compromise. • Worried a list of rights might be seen as the ONLY rights people had. • Thought the Constitution needed a list of protected rights. • Opposed the Constitution as is. • Believed citizens had rights that should be protected. • Wanted the Constitution to be approved as is. • Believed in American independence and freedom.