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How the pancreas controls blood sugar levels

How the pancreas controls blood sugar levels

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How the pancreas controls blood sugar levels

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  1. How the pancreas controls blood sugar levels

  2. http://bcs.whfreeman.com/thelifewire/content/chp50/5002s.swf • ANIMATION

  3. Insulin *produced in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas * a hormone that helps move glucose from the blood into the body *lowers blood glucose levels

  4. Glucagon *a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps increase blood glucose levels (opposite of insulin)

  5. Glycogen • A polysaccharide that functions as energy storage in animals. • Glucose that is not immediately used for metabolism and energy is stored as glycogen • Any glucose in excess of the needs for energy and storage (as glycogen) is converted to fat.

  6. After you eat – when blood glucose levels are high • When your blood glucose begins to rise (after eating), the level of insulin should also rise. • Insulin acts on the cells of your body and makes them take glucose into the cells from the bloodstream. • Some of the glucose is used by the cells for energy, and some is converted into stores of energy (glycogen or fat).

  7. When you haven’t had anything to eat OR in between meals – when blood glucose levels are low • When your blood glucose level begins to fall, the level of insulin falls. • Low blood sugar levels stimulate the pancreas to make glucagon. • Glucagon works on cells in the liver, causing the release of glucose. (If sugar levels in the blood rise above normal, the pancreas stops releasing glucagon. Insulin may then be released to balance the system again)

  8. SUMMARY • The production of insulin and glucagon by the pancreas helps to keep the level of glucose in your blood at a steady level. • When you eat, levels of sugar in your blood rise and insulin helps to bring them down. • Between meals, when your sugar levels fall, glucagon helps to keep them up.