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Stefan Arbanowski, François Carrez, Olaf Droegehorn, Stefan Gessler, Wolfgang Kellerer WWRF13, Jeju, Korea, Feb. 2-3, 2 PowerPoint Presentation
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Stefan Arbanowski, François Carrez, Olaf Droegehorn, Stefan Gessler, Wolfgang Kellerer WWRF13, Jeju, Korea, Feb. 2-3, 2

Stefan Arbanowski, François Carrez, Olaf Droegehorn, Stefan Gessler, Wolfgang Kellerer WWRF13, Jeju, Korea, Feb. 2-3, 2

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Stefan Arbanowski, François Carrez, Olaf Droegehorn, Stefan Gessler, Wolfgang Kellerer WWRF13, Jeju, Korea, Feb. 2-3, 2

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  1. WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 Generic Service Elements STRATEGIC VISION on future research directions in the wireless field Stefan Arbanowski, François Carrez, Olaf Droegehorn, Stefan Gessler,Wolfgang Kellerer WWRF13, Jeju, Korea, Feb. 2-3, 2005 WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  2. Reference Model Communication Space (Contexts & Objects) User Model & Appl. Scenarios Service Semantic Ambient Awareness Personalization Adaptation Service Bundling ServiceControl Service Discovery Service Creation Environment Monitoring Service Deployment ConflictResolution Generic Service Elements for all layers Application Support Layer Service Platform BusinessModel Service Execution Layer Service Support Layer IP based Communication Subsystem Network Control & Management Layer IP Transport Layer Networks Wired or wireless Networks Devices and Communication End Systems Terminals WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  3. Mobi Home Office Life Car School Complex Service Infrastructure Interworking Technology Islands Context Talking & Messaging (person-to-person) Doing (alone) Business Models Locations Sharing (one-to-some) Automating (machine-to-machine[s]) Operability Publishing (one-to-many) Rapid Creation of Services Deployment WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  4. Mobi Life Multiple devices & modalities Multiple roles People shift between different roles in participating different groups, using multiple devices with different modalities over different networks Person Multiple services Group Multiple networks BAN PAN WAN Surrounding world WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  5. Definition: Generic Service Elements • A GSE is a functional software component that can be used by other GSEs, services, or applications and it is hosted by the Service platform. • GSEs provide functionalities common to different services and applications to ease and shorten their development process. • GSEs are all equipped with a dedicated shell ( a set of common interfaces for automatic publishing, discovery, AAA, management and monitoring, etc..) WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  6. Generic Service Elements • GSEs implement generic functions, protocols that are needed to build any kind of services and applications and to support their execution at run-time • GSEs properties & principles: • Reusable and Composable • Loosely coupled • Cooperative and Distributed • Well-defined open interfaces • A set of common interfaces • Easily deployable WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  7. Composability & Orchestration • Services, application and potentially other Generic Service Elements shall be composed or be relying on a collection of GSEs, that in addition will be not necessarily implemented and managed by the same administrative authority. • This property will enable the creation of complex services based on previously created ones. It will ease and speed-up the service creation process by providing reusable service components that can be embedded into new services. • Orchestration and composability should be able to operate even across different technologies, providing the existence of a common interfacing formalism. WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  8. Loosely coupled • The relationship between Services and Application and GSE are demand driven and dynamic. Services will be based on the composition and orchestration of abstract capabilities that are dynamically mapped to corresponding GSE at run-time. • Given a functionality, the choice of a GSE against another one (providing that both of them provide the required functionality) results from a negotiation based on a number of criteria (including -but not limited to- their location, availability, QoS, Service Level Agreement, pricing and a number of security concerns). • Loosely coupled GSE have the flexibility to co-operate dynamically with each other across heterogeneous middleware technologies and different administrative domains. • The loosely coupled GSE are essentially the basic building blocks from which more sophisticated services (or GSEs) can be constructed WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  9. Distribution • The different GSE are potentially located in many different locations using different technologies, and then managed by many different administrative domains. • The distribution of the GSEs across different domains must not be a hurdle to their discovery and use. • Special mechanisms have to be invented to ease the access to these GSEs and also the communication and interworking between GSEs (and between the platforms that support the GSEs) to facilitate a high level of cooperation between them. WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  10. Easily deployable • As soon as a GSE has been developed, it can be incorporated to a service platform, enriching it then with a new capability. • In addition, incorporating the GSE shall be done with a minimum (if not zero) of additional cost in term of announcement, configuration, compiling etc… • A basic platform can be then specialised according to the party by adding a number of these basic components. WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  11. Easy to discover and to invoke • GSEs shall be equipped with the needed material allowing a calling party (another GSE, an application using the GSE,…) to discover about the purpose of the GSE, its general description, the mean to invoke it. • Following the “loosely coupled” principle, the GSE associated description or profile must provide the information that allow a calling party to discriminate among different GSE in order to choose the one that offer the best fit with the caller’s requirements. • Should no GSE fits the requirement of the calling party, it would be possible, based on the GSE semantic description, to build another GSE workflow that behaves similarly to the missing GSE. • A formalism and companion language shall be provided to allow the description of GSE characteristics (semantics) and the establishment of search criteria. WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  12. GSE based Service Platform WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  13. How is the I want weather going to personalized be here local news! tomorrow? Adaptation Service Service Discovery Orchestration Ambient Weather Positioning Awareness Forecast Positioning Positioning Service Execution Environment GALILEO Cell ID Positioning Positioning Service Execution Environment Find me a hotel Applications room! Service Platform Newsfeed Positioning Data Broker „Subscriber Hotel AAA Data“ HSS/HLR Reservation Broker d e Underlying s x i k F r o c w t o e H s N - k d r A Heterogeneous o s s w e t l e s e N r k i r W o w t e Networks N WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  14. Mechanisms needed to support GSE principles • Deployment • Communication • Cooperation • Referencing/Finding • Security features • Common interfaces • From Service Logic to GSE • … WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  15. Types of GSE Basic GSE • Registration, Repository and Discovery facilities • Ontology repository and management • Component Orchestration and Choreography • Brokering/Aggregation • Negotiation/Cooperation/Service Level Agreement • Presence, Location • Service Delivery (push technology, agent technology) • User/Group management • Service Management • Administrative domain and policy management • Reasoning and inferencing facilities/Rule Based Systems • Information and Knowledge Retrieval • Security, Privacy WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  16. Types of GSE Operation support GSE • Accounting, Charging, Billing • Federation • Subscription • Service bundling • Service creation • Service deployment • Conflict resolution WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  17. Types of GSE User-centric GSE* (1/3) • GSE for Personalization/Profiling • Acquisition of user preferences (e.g., click stream analyser, statistic based user profiler) • Storage of preferences in user profiles (e.g., data base with enhanced information model) • Profile exchange (e.g., overlay protocol) • User context management (e.g., information model) • Preference-based activation of the user context *derived from the factors describing the I-centric capabilities, see WWRF Briefing WG2-br2 WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  18. Types of GSE User-centric GSE* (2/3) • GSE for Ambient Awareness • Ambient information acquisition (e.g., sensor API, HMI) • Exchange of ambient information (e.g., context information model) • Interpretation of ambient information (e.g., knowledge inference) • Provision of ambient information to services and portal components *derived from the factors describing the I-centric capabilities, see WWRF Briefing WG2-br2 WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  19. Types of GSE User-centric GSE* (3/3) • GSE for Adaptation • Detection of changes (e.g., environment monitoring, event notification) • Component discovery, replacement, relocation, combination, configuration (e.g., Distributed Application Framework) • Model usage (e.g., perception service, modelling service, ontology service, semantic matching engine) • Mobile Distributed Information Base • Media Adaptation (e.g., text-to-speech, video/audio stream adaptation, transcoding) • Content adaptation (e.g., presentation, reordering, add/delete information) • Terminal adaptation *derived from the factors describing the I-centric capabilities, see WWRF Briefing WG2-br2 WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  20. Summary • A Generic Service Element (GSE) is a functional software component that can be used by other GSEs, services, or applications and it is hosted by the Service platform. • GSEs provide functionalities common to different services and applications to ease and shorten their development process. • This WWRF Briefing presents GSE principles and properties, a GSE based platform architecture and GSE examples WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  21. Credits to • All contributors of the WG2 White Paper on “Generic Service Elements and Enabling Technologies“ WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea

  22. Contact • See http://www.wireless-world-research.org/ • See http://wg2.ww-rf.org/ • mailto: arbanowski@fokus.fraunhofer.de • mailto: kellerer@docomolab-euro.com WWRF Briefing WG2-br3 · Kellerer/Arbanowski · wg2@wireless-world-research.org · 2.-3.2.2005 · WWRF13, Korea