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Guiding

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Guiding

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  1. Guiding Instruction

  2. TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY Guided Strategic use of questions, prompts, and cues Find out what “stuck” and what didn’t

  3. Guided instruction takes place throughout the day.

  4. Robust questions Prompts Cues Direct explanation and modeling

  5. Robust questions Prompts Cues Direct explanation and modeling

  6. Teacher: What is a nocturnal animal? Student: An animal that stays awake at night. Teacher: Good. What is a diurnal animal? I-R-E

  7. Teacher: What is a nocturnal animal? Student: An animal that stays awake at night. Teacher: Tell me more about that. Does a nocturnal animal have special characteristics? Student: Well, it doesn’t sleep a lot. Probe

  8. Teacher: What is a nocturnal animal? Student: An animal that stays awake at night. Teacher: Tell me more about that. Does a nocturnal animal have special characteristics? Student: Well, it doesn’t sleep a lot. Misconception

  9. Teacher: What is a nocturnal animal? Student: An animal that stays awake at night. Teacher: Tell me more about that. Does a nocturnal animal have special characteristics? Student: Well, it doesn’t sleep a lot. Teacher: I’m thinking of those pictures we saw of the great horned owl and the slow loris in the daytime and at night. Does your answer still work? PROMPT

  10. Elicitation Elaboration Clarifying Inventive Divergent Heuristic 6 Types

  11. Intention uncovering, nottesting

  12. How do these teachers guide, rather than simply tell?

  13. How do these teachers guide, rather than simply tell?

  14. Teacher Poses a Question Student responds Is the answer appropriate? Yes No Probe to elicit more information Prompt to elicit background knowledge Focus on cognitive/metacognitive

  15. Questioning is about assessment Prompting is about doing

  16. Prompts So the student does the cognitive work

  17. Background knowledge prompts invite students to use what they know to resolve problems

  18. Process or Procedure Prompts To perform a specific task

  19. Teacher Poses a Question Student responds Is the answer appropriate? Yes No Prompt to elicit background knowledge Focus on cognitive/metacognitive Probe to elicit more information Is the answer appropriate? Is the answer appropriate? Yes Yes No No Pose new question Cue to shift Attention to Information source Pose new question

  20. Cues Shift attention to sources of information More directandspecificthan prompts

  21. the expert commentator sees things you don’t cues do the same for novices Attention grows with competence

  22. 6 Types Visual Physical Gestural Positional Verbal Environmental

  23. Direct Explanation Identify Explain Think aloud Monitor Take care not to re-assume responsibility too quickly

  24. QUESTION Responds Appropriate? No Yes Probe PROMPT Yes Appropriate? Appropriate? No No Yes New question New question CUE Is the answer appropriate? Yes No Pose new question OFFER DIRECT EXPLANATION AND MODELING Pose original question again

  25. How does Rita guide, rather than simply tell?

  26. How does Rita guide, rather than simply tell?

  27. The Third Idea: Teach for metacognition.

  28. Making Group Work Productive

  29. Collaborative STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Productive group work Group and individual accountability Productive failure

  30. Students are consolidating their understanding • Negotiating understanding with peers • Engaging in inquiry • Apply knowledge to novel situations

  31. The Helping Curriculum

  32. Conversational Roundtable Summarize

  33. Productive failure

  34. What does it look like? What does it sound like?

  35. What are your favorite ways to encourage collaboration between students? What are the benefits and challenges?

  36. How does Maria: • Establish purpose? • Model her thinking? • Demonstrate? • Provide language supports? • Utilize productive group work? • Provide guided instruction? • Check for understanding? • Foster metacognition?

  37. How does Maria: • Establish purpose? • Model her thinking? • Demonstrate? • Provide language supports? • Utilize productive group work? • Provide guided instruction? • Check for understanding? • Foster metacognition?

  38. Independent Learning: Not Just “Do It Yourself” School

  39. Independent STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY In-class independent learning Out-of-class independent learning “Independent” doesn’t mean no support!

  40. In-class independent learning Out-of-class (homework)

  41. How do you get help? Talk to students whenever possible. How do you know when you’re done? What are you learning?

  42. 26% Number of high school teachers who“often or very often” run out of time in class and assign the content for homework (MetLife, 2008)

  43. Traditional homework occurs too soon in the instructional cycle.

  44. Goals of Homework • Fluency building • Application • Spiral review • Extension Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Homework and the gradual release of responsibility: Making responsibility possible. English Journal,98(2), 40-45.

  45. What’s for homework tonight? TIP: Consider the background knowledge students are using during the day’s lesson.

  46. The Takeaway

  47. Develop quality indicators

  48. Consistency Interaction Metacognition

  49. Finding Using Producing Sharing information